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Daily Posts. Colorful Ideas & Inspirations.

Our team of writers brings you daily trend coverage, new products, inspiration, information and fun ideas. With an archive of more than 2,024 articles, you're sure to find something you love. Or if you have a great idea, let us know!

Vintage Color & Design: Polish Book Covers

Vintage Color & Design: Polish Book Covers


A nice collection of Polish book covers from the blog A Journey Around My Skull.

"Unhealthy book fetishism from a reader, collector, and amateur historian of forgotten literature."


druga_zmiana

Kazdy

KASK

Lucy_Crown
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The Colors Of Drew Struzan

The Colors Of Drew Struzan


Drew Struzan is an American Artist best known for his extensive movie poster work on some of the best-known films of all time. A particular favorite artist of film directors George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, Struzan created distinct and indelible images for many of their film releases.


Back_to_the_Future Star_Wars

coming_to_americaAn_American_Tail
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Flora Fauna: Bird Editions By Josh Brill

Flora Fauna: Bird Editions By Josh Brill


A wonderful set of bird prints from Josh Brill.

The Flora Fauna collection is a cataloging of the design identities of plants and animals from around the world. Examining the visual character differences and similarities of species. A field guide of discovery, beginning with birds.


Western_Tanager Green_Honeycreeper


Superb_Fairy-Wren Vermilion_Flycatche

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The Colors Of Alberto Cerriteño

The Colors Of Alberto Cerriteño


On the recommendation of COLOURlovers' member Caori, we're having a look at the color compositions of Alberto Cerriteño. Alberto is a Mexican illustrator and designer based in Portland, Oregon, whose expressive characters and desaturated palettes meld together to create a striking, beautiful and cohesive illustrative style.

Strongly inspired by urban vinyl toys, alternative cartoons, and the pop surrealism movement, Alberto Cerriteño has developed his own very personal technique and style, having always present a delicate hints of traditional Mexican artistic influences in his management of rich textures and decorative patterns. These contrast strikingly with the blending of desaturated colors and ink, sometimes featuring a vintage coffee finish.

A.Cerriteño_Recuerdo A.CerriteñoChupacabr


A.Cerriteño_lolo A.Cerriteño_puffy

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Vintage Color & Design: Esquire Magazine

Vintage Color & Design: Esquire Magazine


While in recent years the covers of Esquire have featured a man in a suit or an at-least-half-naked woman, this wasn't always the trend. The art direction was first under the keen eye of Paul Rand from 1936-1941, followed by Henry Wolf from 1952-1958, and Robert Benton from 1958-1964, and during those times the magazine had many smart, creative, engaging and colorful covers.

Here is a selection of Esquire magazine covers between 1946 and 1971. The entire collection can be viewed on their site, and was brought to my attention by grain edit.


Esquire_1946_-10

Esquire_1946_-_6

Esquire_1958_-_1

Esquire_1961_-_12
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Color & Design: Polish Film Posters

Color & Design: Polish Film Posters


Color inspiration from the collection of American movie posters at polishposter.com.


odstrzal dirty_rotten_scndrls


krolewskie_marzenie color_film_blocks

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Vintage Color & Design: Japanese Postcards

Vintage Color & Design: Japanese Postcards


Highlights from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston's collection of Japanese postcards from the early 1900's.


fly_glider

sleep_well_mustache

monkey_paper_plane

monkey_9_32
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The Colors Of Stefan Kanchev

The Colors Of Stefan Kanchev


"The purpose of this project is to fill the information vacuum about the life and art of Stefan Kanchev. The quality of his works is so high that they are worthy to be shared with more people. Kanchev is the author of more than 1000 trade marks and symbols, 650 stamps, posters, post cards and envelopes, book covers, packaging and etc. It turned out that the gathering and processing of Kanchev’s art were very difficult tasks mainly because most of the works have sunk in the past. But the start is made. This project is a result of two years of hard work and doesn’t claim to be comprehensive. The work is not finished, actually it starts now and begins to evolve. The project is open to all who would like to contribute. Any information about Stefan Kanchev is welcome and would enrich the site. All signals of discrepancies or inaccuracies regarding project names, years or information are also welcome." - Trade Marks and Symbols of Stefan Kanchev

30_bird 13_bird

bulgaria ship_1985-25

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Vintage Color & Design: 'Book Worship'

Vintage Color & Design: 'Book Worship'


Book Worship, as the blog's creator Shawn Hazen puts it, "represents the obsessions of an atypical book collector."

Here, for your color inspiration is a selection from the site's collection of "graphically interesting, but otherwise uncollectible, books that entered and exited bookstores quietly in the 50s, 60s, and 70s."


Riddles_in_Math
The_Paris_Review

TheNightofWencesias

Mathematics__Logic
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The Colors Of Playing Cards

The Colors Of Playing Cards


Playing cards were found in China as early as the 9th century during the Tang Dynasty (618–907), when relatives of a princess played a "leaf game". The Tang writer Su E  stated that Princess Tongchang, daughter of Emperor Yizong of Tang, played the leaf game with members of the Wei clan to pass the time. The Song Dynasty (960–1279) scholar Ouyang Xiu (1007–1072) asserted that card games existed since the mid Tang Dynasty and associated their invention with the simultaneous development of using sheets or pages instead of paper rolls as a writing medium. A book called Yezi Gexi was allegedly written by a Tang era woman, and was commented on by Chinese writers of subsequent dynasties.

Ancient Chinese "money cards" have four "suits": coins (or cash), strings of coins (which may have been misinterpreted as sticks from crude drawings), myriads of strings, and tens of myriads. These were represented by ideograms, with numerals of 2–9 in the first three suits and numerals 1–9 in the "tens of myriads". Wilkinson suggests that the first cards may have been actual paper currency which were both the tools of gaming and the stakes being played for. The designs on modern Mahjong tiles likely evolved from those earliest playing cards. However, it may be that the first deck of cards ever printed was a Chinese domino deck, in whose cards we can see all the 21 combinations of a pair of dice. In Kuei-t'ien-lu, a Chinese text redacted in the 11th century, we find that dominoes cards were printed during the Tang Dynasty, contemporary to the first printed books. The Chinese word pái (牌) is used to describe both paper cards and gaming tiles.

An Indian origin for playing cards has been suggested by the resemblance of symbols on some early European decks (traditional Sicilian cards, for example) to the ring, sword, cup, and baton classically depicted in the four hands of Indian statues.

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