Camille Walala: Colorful art inspired by African tribes


PRINT - DESIGN - INTERIORS... three keywords that best describe Camille's work and life.

 

 

 

Her work is easily recognizable and inspiring. The color combinations she uses are lively and playful and her unique style is influenced by the African tribes and the Memphis Movement from the 80’s. She personally describes it as TribalPop.

 

 

About Camille

A graduate in textile design from the University of Brighton, Camille Walala established her studio and brand in East London in 2009, and has since evolved from textile-based work to art direction, interior design and large-scale civic art and installation projects.

 

 

Drawing on influences including the Memphis Movement, the Ndebele tribe and Victor Vasarely, Walala has an irrepressible enthusiasm for playful, graphic patterns that invoke a smile. Her dedication to positivity, optimistic typography and bold use of pattern and colour have seen her transform urban landscapes across the world, and earned her clients ranging from Converse and Armani to Nintendo and Facebook.

 

 

Follow Camille's work: websiteInstagram

 

 

What do you think of Camille's art? Does it inspire you? Does it make you happy? Let us know in the comments.

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Colors and flags


When talking about colors and their meanings in different cultures, we should acknowledge the colorful representation of countries, which can tell us a lot about the history and the people. While having in mind everything we know about color psychology, let's take a look at a few interesting examples of what colors represent in flags.

 

 

Everyone is familiar with the look of the US flag - the thirteen stripes represent the thirteen founding states, and fifty stars current fifty states. The colors for this flag were taken from the British flag, and later on, the meaning was assigned to them such as courage, purity, and justice. It is interesting how in the Philippines flag blue is for peace, truth, and justice, while red is for patriotism; but originally these colors are meant to acknowledge the help of the US during the revolution.

For some countries, colors stand for a political system or revolution. At the flag of China, the color red represents the communist revolution, while the stars stand for communist party and the people. Just the same as China, the flag of Vietnam is red for communism, and the star represents the power of the people in Vietnam.

Something similar is happening in the flag of Bangladesh - the circle is for the sun, while it's color is red for the blood of the people who fought for independence. The green, on the other hand, stands out the beauty of nature in Bangladesh. Color green also appears in the Nigerian flag, to represent natural resources, while the white color stands for peace.

 

 

Some flags are storytelling. Egyptian flag begins their story with British occupation (red), followed up with bloodless revolution (white), and ending with Egypt being independent (black). The color blue in the flag of Congo is telling us about peace while there is this red strap over the flag to respect the rebellion which led them to peace.

In some multicultural countries, colors symbolize a variety of religions which citizens respect. In Pakistan for example, green is for the Islamic population and white represents the minorities. Also in India, green is for the Muslims, and Safran color represents Hindu population.

There are also some examples of philosophy expressed through colors in the flag, like in Indonesia. The color red in the Indonesian flag stands for courage, but also the human body, and the white for purity and the human soul, which then means that combined they make a whole person.

 

 

It is amazing how we use colors to express respect for great events in national history, as well as to express ideology. This colorful marks for national identity are a part of human behavior since the tribes, and it is another great visual implication for everything we have in common, as well as how beautifully diverse we all are.

 

What do you think about the colors of the flag? Do you know any other flag color meanings?  Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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Top designer programs


Every graphic designer has his/her own preference when it comes to a set of programs to express creativity. Whether your criteria is how easy it is to use, how flexible is the user interface for you, or how many preferences it has, we usually make our pick and get used to one program forever and ever.

 

 

For years, Adobe seems to be designers first choice all over the world. Users like Adobe Photoshop as it's easy to use, basic features are making the whole experience smooth and most of the tools are quite effective. Photoshop is a beginner's first choice, it is simple for use to for RAW format images and rendering is also pretty easy.

Designers also love Adobe Illustrator. It is a great tool for branding, mostly used for logos, typography etc, but it could also find application in video illustrations. It is compatible with both Mac and Windows, but a very expensive tool to get.

 

 

Besides Photoshop and Illustrator, Adobe InDesign is common in designer's practice. It is used for magazine and book covers, flyers and brochures, for digital as much as printed versions. It takes some time to get in the game with this program, as for most of Adobe software, so we don't recommend it for when you need your publication ready for tomorrow and you've never used InDesign before.

 

 

One of the most used alternatives to Photoshop would be GIMP. One of the many cool advantages is that it's compatible with different operating systems, on top of being simple to use and that interface is very adaptive to modern users. An alternative for Illustrator is Inkscape, which is a free tool for dealing with vectors, and also available on Windows, Linux, and Mac.

Another great choice for vector graphic designing is CorelDraw, which is a very popular software and its features are rated as outstanding. Users are quite satisfied with how easy it is to use, and also the training videos are making it even more simple. Regarding the price, there are different subscriptions available, while the downside is there is no Mac version of this program. Other apps from this provider are Corel PaintShop and Corel PhotoImpact.

 

 

Some other apps with cool features are also a very old ACDSEE Photo Editor, then Serif PhotoPlus and Serif DrawPlus, CyberLink PhotoDirector, Xara, Vector with the free basic plan, Google Sketch-up for easy 3D modeling and more interesting features with Pro plan.

Which are your favorites? How easy are Adobe programs to use, compared to their opponents? Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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June and July edition: Colours have feelings too


June and July together were months full of color! We asked how palettes made you feel on our Twitter channel, and you answered. Thank you for being so active in expressing your opinion Colourlovers! Let's review the questions that we asked and the winning palettes.

  • Which palette was the saddest?
  • Which palette was the most ?
  • Which palette looked most like ?
  • Which palette screamed #jealousy?
  • Which palette looked like #sun the most?
  • Which palette made by Napkin guy was your favorite?
  • Which #green palette was your favorite?
  • Which was the best  inspired palette?
  • Which was the best summer palette inspired by and ?
  • The best palette inspired by ?
  • Which palette screamed #passion?
  • What palette is best to describe today's ? (23rd July)
  • What was the best palette inspired by the ?

 

JUNE

 

1. Emotions - what color palettes made you feel

 

The saddest palette : Since when
https://bit.ly/2HcjpqX

 

The most mystical palette : his mystical beard

 

The palette that described #betrayal the best: Anger Management

 

The palette that screamed #jealousy: jealous*

 

 

2. Resemblance - what color palettes looked like

 

The palette that looked like #sun the most: Here Comes the Sun

https://bit.ly/2sViGWa

 

3. Favorite of Napkin guy's palettes

 

Favorite Napkin guy's palette was: take my breath away

 

4. Best color inspired palette - the best green

 

Favorite #green palette : A Dream in Color

 

 

JULY

 

1. Emotions - what color palettes made you feel

 

The best #passion palette: infatuation

bit.ly/2uQMUul

 

2. Resemblance - what color palettes looked like

 

The best #icecream palette: Icecream Truck

 

The best #sand and #sea inspired palette: shifting sands & sea

 

The best #emptyspaces palette: my empty space

 

The best #mind inspired palette: Clouds in my mind

 

3. The mood of the day palette

 

The palette which described the #mood of the day (23rd July): Flat ideas

 

 

So, Colourlovers, what do you think about the palettes? Do you see any pattern? :D
Share which one is your favorite. We can't wait to hear from you!

 

About the author:

Ana is the community manager and editor at Colorlovers. She is a part-time traveler and part time web and graphic designer. She is passionate about photography and nature -  a never-ending source of inspiration.

 

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The Emotional and Behavioral Effects of Color


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It is difficult to dispute the importance of color to branding-related endeavors. Color is evocative, creates an attraction between consumers and products and is capable of boosting recognition of a brand significantly.

 

The fact of the matter is that colors have the ability to produce feelings of happiness or sadness, sensations of thirst or even fatigue. Designers need to grasp the ways in which different colors can psychologically impact everyday people, including the audience a client intends to reach. It is worth reviewing the manner in which color guides our decisions, emotional reactions and moods.

 

Warmer Tones

 

Sitting adjacent to one another on the color wheel are hues of yellow, orange and red. These are known as warm colors, and they are known to bring about a feeling of energy, gladness and hopefulness. It is also necessary to note that orange and yellow may cause irritation to some people's eyes, and they can work to boost appetites.

 

Consider some of the more popular fast food establishments and their frequent use of red and yellow in packaging, logos and the like. What is the reason for this? The goal is to prompt feelings of hunger and an impulse to eat something immediately.

 

Stunning Reds

 

Dynamic and warm in nature, red routinely sparks the full emotional spectrum. Many think of it as a color of love and passion, but also of risk and rage. This is a color that can set heart rates racing and generate a sense of real excitement. If a design element needs to receive a significant amount of attention, such as an online security alert, it is wise to render it in red. Used as an accent, however, red should be applied moderately, since it has a tendency to feel overwhelming at times.

 

Oranges

 

This is a color grouping that generates happy, vital feelings in those who see it. It is an attention-grabbing hue, but it does not feel quite as powerful as red. Orange is forceful, but maintains balance and friendliness. For effective calls to action and invitations to subscribe to or purchase a product, orange can be an ideal choice.

 

Sunny Yellows

 

In terms of the warm color family, yellow might just be the tone with the most energy. It conjures thoughts of sun, laughter and light. Yellow accents are great for producing an optimistic vibe in viewers. Of course, yellow does reflect large amounts of light and may feel harsh or irritating at times. Thus, this color should be used in a measured way in order to draw attention just where it is needed.

 

Cooler Hues

 

Purple, green and blue comprise the cool color family. These tones generally produce feelings of calmness and serenity, though they can also be seen as somewhat sad. Many feel that purple is great for promoting creativity, given that it blends relaxing blue with fiery red. Clients needed to generate an aura of beauty, healthfulness or safety ought to think about using these types of colors.

 

Grassy Green

 

This color has long reflected feelings of wealth, health and regeneration. Green is pleasing to the eye and can help in the creation of balanced designs.

 

Beautiful Blues

 

Tranquility, spirituality and trust are all feelings elicited by the color blue. While darker blues are great for generating a professional look for corporate clients, when used to excess, the effect can be rather cold. Lighter tones of blue create an approachable and friendly vibe.

 

Powerful Purples

 

Long recognized as a color connected to royalty and wealth, purple tends to lend a soothing air. Therefore, it is a popular choice for cosmetic and personal care products. Deep purples are perfect when a sense of luxury is required.

 

Comfortable Neutrals

 

White, tan, black, gray and brown are essential colors for the backgrounds of great web design. White, black and gray are great for pairing with bright tones. When texture is part of the design scheme, brown or tan backdrops are key.

 

Designers must always remember that responses to color are very subjective and may differ substantially depending on the cultural background of the viewer. Because of this, designers must never fail to research their intended audience and make deliberate color choices based on their findings.

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Alexander Khokhlov: Not an ordinary dog lover


Alexander Khokhlov is a photographer based in Moscow, Russia. He's a self-taught photographer that started his career in 2008 as an event and reportage photographer. Most of all he likes to recreate ideas of make-up transformations. He is well-known for his illusionary artworks such as "Weird Beauty" or "2D or not 2D series". Besides art, his great passion is dog photography! In a big project called "The Dog Show", his wife Veronica Ershova and him tried to show both the beauty of the breed and personality of a dog in order to explore the wonderful world of our four-legged friends.



They started the project in 2017 and since then dozens of dogs have taken part in it. Each of them is unique, and that is what they try to show in their photos. Alexander and Veronica are very proud that the series was awarded by the famous international competitions: PDN Faces 2017 (Animal Portraits, Winner), Moscow International Foto Awards 2018 (Photographers of the Year, Nature category), Prix De La Photographie Paris 2017 (Silver, Nature/Domestic Animals), Tokyo International Foto Awards 2018 (Bronze, Nature/Pets).



Alexander worked with brands like Four Seasons, Hilton Bankside, SVA Zürich, and Solid Gold Pet.



He was interviewed and featured in CNN, Town & Country, PDN Magazine, Scientific American MIND, Professional Photographer, Talk Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Mail, Wired, Life magazine, Phlearn.com and others.
Make sure to explore other project that Alexander worked on, including the one "Like human, like pet" which behind the scene you can see here.

Connect with Alexander on social media: Instagram

 

 

What inspires you about Alexander's art? The unique perspective he gives to the ordinary topics? The beautiful lighting that he uses? The whole world of imagination he manages to give life to? Let us know in the comments.

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Design and design thinking


Through years of learning from communication with different clients, having constant development and change, designers have set a new trend in problem-solving methodology. Designer's work demands that the ideas are always fresh, but also functional and practical, which is why there is a need for a learning mind, the kind that tests a product and then improves it.

 

 

Designers impact to problem-solving is a methodology which existed long before in science and IT sector, but it wasn't till designers age that it became popular in various other sectors, which explains the name "design thinking".

The main characteristic of this process is that it's looking at the possibility for solutions, and not the problems, as well that it's customer-oriented. In design thinking, people are what matters, which is why empathy plays a significant role while searching for solutions. There is always a question of "how does this person (target group) feel"?

 

 

The important tool to start design thinking is brainstorming. This is how a creative search for ideas start. Brainstorming is useful to explore various perspectives on looking at the task, which allows us many approaches to find the solution.

Design thinkers are especially good at solving problems which are difficult to define. A well-defined problem is a problem half-solved, and to understand some problems we need to dig deeper and look beyond the surface. Designers are also always ready to learn and they rely on the knowledge gathered from previous experiences. Sometimes all it takes to solve a problem efficiently is to consider patterns which solved similar problems before. What this means is that also you may use similarly structured problems from different sectors - you can apply a method from technology to resolve a challenge within the social sector.

 

 

Stages of problem-solving, designer-style, are: defining the problem; doing all the research regarding the problem; brainstorming ideas and choosing the focus; after which comes prototyping and then testing. The key to design thinking is that this is a repetitive process - after testing, we either leave the idea and move on to the next one or keep the idea and improve it further, after which we again create a prototype to test and so on, until we are satisfied with the solution.

This methodology introduced many useful tools for everyday work, such as creating prototypes, user profiles, mind mapping, storytelling and visual way of teaching and learning.

Design thinking, as a creative processing of challenges, relies on strategies which are useful for designers, but also IT, business and NGO sector.

 

Have you ever used design thinking while creating? What was the best part of it? How did it improve your creative process?

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

 

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Color theory 101


We, the Colorlovers, know best that color plays a vital role in everyday life. It communicates between us all the time, with no need for words or sounds. Color makes us notice some things more than others, and helps us differentiate important from irrelevant. Colors have also the ability to evoke emotions and make us feel good while wearing our fashion choice.

 

 

While talking about how certain colors work awesome together, in some of our previous articles, we were mentioning the color theory. What color theory explains is why some colors work well together, and some never will. This is very handy to know, whether you are a designer, redecorating your home or simply making everyday clothing combination. How does it work?

 

We learn about primary and secondary colors very early in school. Mixing primary colors (red, yellow and blue), we get secondary shades (orange, green and purple). Furthermore, mixing every shade next to one another we get the color wheel of gradient between basic colors. While exploring mixing colors, it's important to consider hue (the color), saturation (intensity of the color, from subtle to vibrant), and value (how bright/dark the color is, moving from white to black).

 

 

So how do we achieve color harmony, using ranges of hue, saturation and value?

 

The easiest style for harmonic palette is monochromatic, using only one color from the color wheel, and creating variations by using saturation and value. Monochromatic color palettes are 100% secure to work well, they always match.

 

An analogous color palette uses the colors which are next to each other in the color wheel, such as from blue to green. Playing with these you can get a variety of well mixed colors for your design.

 

Another style for mixing colors is complementary, using colors opposite from one another in the color wheel, such as blue and orange. To create interesting and refreshing palette, we again use lighter or darker shades of colors, and a different intensity.

 

 

Split complementary scheme uses the colors on either side of the complementary color, which uses the same contrast, except we have more colors to play with.

 

Triadic way of choosing color is to choose ones which are equally spaced on the color wheel. These color combinations are visually very effective and are to be used with caution ?

 

Tetradic color mixing is using four colors from the wheel, although the palette looks best if one color dominates, and others are used for details and as refreshment.

 

Other important thing to bare in mind when mixing colors is that there aren't two vibrant shades next to each other, colors used need to be easy for the eyes of the viewer. Keep browsing Colorlovers to find inspiration and palettes from our members and contributors!

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

 

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Using Colors for Effect in Photography


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Every designer knows the art of using colors to elicit a desired emotion.  Whether it is to create a certain comfortable feel in a bedroom, setting the right tone for a web page, or creating a mood for shops or restaurants; choosing the right color palette is a critical design decision.  But did you know the same principals apply when creating a work of art?

 

Take photography as an example.  Manipulating elements within the image can produce a dramatic difference to the feeling of the shot.  Understanding the elements involved – and the techniques for manipulating them – can help the new artist achieve results that go beyond creating beautiful images and instead help make a deeper emotional connection with the viewer.

 

Color of Light

Photography is often referred to as painting with light.  And light has its own color.  Light falls on a sliding scale of warm (yellow and orange tones) – most often associated with sunshine or daylight, to cold (blue tones) -  created by man made florescent type lighting.

Light sources can even shift within the scale, like sunlight depending on the time of day.  The hour just sunrise or before sunset is called “The Golden Hour”the blu by photographers because the sunlight has a soft, warm, golden hue.  But the hour just before sunrise or after sunset is referred to as “The Blue Hour” because the angle of the sun to Earth is allowing only the blue spectrum light to appear.   Photographing the same subject just hours apart will produce dramatically different feels to an image.

 

Filter effects

Light can be manipulated through the use of filters.   In prehistoric times, photographers had to physically attach gels to the front of the camera lens.  Fortunately today the same effect can be achieved within your Smartphone or by using post processing software like Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop.  Use them to enhance the feeling you are looking for with an image, or to completely change the feel of it altogether.

 

Dominate Color

The most obvious place to identify a dominant color is in the main subject of the image.  A photograph of a field of lavender – or a green meadow – are pretty obvious examples as to their color palette.  Subtler can be the hues of a sunset, or uniforms of a marching band on the streets.  Controlling the dominant color sets the feeling for the piece – both the positive or the negative.

 

Red

Passionate, aggressive, important, warmth, anger, revenge, attention

Orange

Playful, energetic, cheap, enthusiasm, courage, creativity

 

Yellow

Happy, friendly, warning, joy, laziness

 

Green

Natural, stable, prosperous, tranquility, calm, money, jealousy, envy, hope

Blue

Serene, trustworthy, inviting, coldness, fear

 

Pink

Feminine, young, innocent

Purple

Luxurious, mysterious, romantic, royalty, foreboding

 

 

Brown

Earthy, sturdy, rustic

 

Black

Powerful, sophisticated, edgy, formal, evil, darkness

White

Clean, virtuous, healthy, cold

 

Grey

Neutral, formal, gloomy

 

Beige

Accentuates surrounding colors

 

 

 

Primary and secondary color

Combining colors will also have the effect of combing emotions.  A woman in a red dress against a black backdrop can show the darker, evil side of passion.   A green plant sprouting in a brown forest shows hope or renewal, while the same plant shot in a sun kissed meadow can show tranquility.

 

So the next time you are out shooting with your camera, stop a minute to think of the emotion you want to elicit from the viewer and apply your color palette well.

 

These colourful images were provided by Dreamstime.com.

 

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Wood or Steel Entry Doors? Here’s How They Compare


 

 

When choosing a new exterior door for your home, there are a lot of things to consider. As the first thing people see when visiting your home, entry doors should not only be durable, but aesthetically pleasing as well. Here’s what you need to know if you’re deciding between wood or steel exterior doors.

 

Durability & Security

 

Entry doors need to be tough in order to withstand wind, rain, sun, and of course — intruders. Steel is one of the most durable and weather-resistant door materials available. Wood doors can scratch, peel, bubble, rot, and warp because of extreme temperatures or water. In contrast, steel entry doors are designed to resist the elements to maintain their shape and strength. Those that have undergone galvanization provide extra resistance to cracking, bowing, and rust. Their resistance to warping adds to their security; heavy duty steel doors are difficult to manipulate and open when they’re locked, making them one of the most secure type of doors.

 

Although steel is more durable, many wooden doors are made with wood-veneer skins over an engineered-wood core, which minimizes the door’s vulnerability to warping. However, neither door type is indestructible — when choosing a replacement door system, be sure to choose a manufacturer such as Centennial Windows & Doors that offers a lifetime warranty so any damage is repaired at no cost to you.

 

Energy Efficiency

 

A common reason for replacing an exterior door is energy efficiency. Those that aren’t properly aligned or damaged can make your energy bills skyrocket. In the case of wooden doors, water can seep into the joints, which loosens them and allows air to flow through, contributing to poor energy efficiency. If you’re choosing wooden doors, make sure to opt for those that are made with a water-barrier construction that helps water run off the door without entering joints. While steel is a conductor of heat, modern manufacturers take this into account to make energy efficient steel doors. Premium steel entry doors are constructed with an improved insulated core, a wooden frame that holds insulation, and coated with galvanized steel — this keeps your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter. When shopping for replacement doors, make sure to look for the ENERGY STAR® certification to ensure you’re buying the most energy efficient doors.

 

Aesthetics & Cost

 

From traditional to contemporary, both wooden and steel doors offer design versatility to suit the look of your home. Wood is a warm, natural, and inviting material, and these exterior doors come in a range of wood types, including maple, walnut, oak, mahogany, cherry, and more. They can also be customized with embellishments and carvings.

 

With the right exterior door manufacturer, you can customize your steel door to be the size, colour, style, and design you want. You can also add glass panels to your door system to make it even more unique. Though usually available in a smooth finish, steel doors can be embossed with a wood-grain pattern, painted in the colour of your choice, and typically have a paneled design that mimics wood styles.

 

Solid wood is usually the most expensive option for an entry door, while steel makes for an affordable exterior door option. Prices vary depending on where you purchase from, but they are typically less expensive than wooden doors.

 

There are many sites that make it easy to directly compare home products. For example, this site in particular offers direct comparisons and reviews of the best water dispenser for your home, and includes reviews from real home owners. By searching online for product review sites, you can quickly confirm your instincts and double check if you are buying the correct products.

 

Whatever exterior door material you choose, make sure you purchase and install from a reliable company who can meet with you to evaluate which type is best for you.

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