Three Generations of Eye Color

Three Generations of Eye Color


Your eye colour had to have come from somewhere. Sure, there's genetics, but let's find a way follow it that doesn't lean so heavily on science. Let's map out your past three generations through colour.

If you can use a photograph, all the better, but if not, try to run on memory.

Make a five-colour palette using the eye colour of each of your grandparents, each of your parents, and your own, and see if there are any overlapping colours.

Here's what I came up with --

three generations

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Colors Changing for June Birthdays

Colors Changing for June Birthdays


Time-honoured is the tradition of celebrating birthdays. Each month, both in the past, and currently, have adopted a set of stones to represent those birth months. To regulate the use of these stones, the Jewelers of America compiled a list for each of the twelve months and gave each a stone in 1912.

For June, according to the modern, traditional, and Zodiac adaptions, June technically has four birthstones. To give something with the birthstone corresponding to the person's birthday is along the same principle as anniversary gifts.

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Colorful Stories Do Not a “Bored” Book Make

Colorful Stories Do Not a “Bored” Book Make


While I don't have vivid memories of being read to, I do remember a lot of the board book stories, and colours in them, from when I was much younger. Some of them are still around in boxes, including the Green Eggs & Ham copy I felt needed some Crayola colour. What I remember of these books is how their colours kept my eyes moving, kept me interested in the moral stories. The colour kept me engaged.

So let's have a look back at five board book stories:

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Color Symbolism: White

Color Symbolism: White


Often associated with purity, white goes with every other colour quite well, much like black. The colour is actually the presence of all colours in the visible light spectrum, reflecting back to the eye something of maximum brightness.

Purity of Thought and Heart

In early Western films, the age when all vaults seemed to be filled with over-stuffed white bags with large dollars signs on them, the good guys wore white, and the bad guys wore black. This ties in with the perception of white being the colour of all things good natured. In traditional weddings, the bride wears white to symbolise her purity and innocence, and during Baptism, the babies are dressed in white gowns. Furthermore, angels almost always have white wings, white clothes, and sometimes even white hair. In the Japanese, Chinese, and Indian cultures, white is a colour of mourning and funerals.

Neutral Pairing

Being the colour that goes with everything, white emphasises the effects of the colours with which it is paired. With cool colours, white appears cool, and the same goes for warm colours.

Connotations of white according to Design Meltdown: Cleanliness, purity, life, stability, trustworthy, peace, happiness, cold, marriage, goodness.

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Interview with Daniel Flück on Color “Blindness”

Interview with Daniel Flück on Color “Blindness”


Colblindor was started in early 2006 when Daniel Flück created a blog based on colour deficiency and colour blindness. The blog has actually become quite the comprehensive resource itself, addressing types of colour blindness and how to distinguish between types of colour blindness.

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CL: What led you to create your blog, Colblindor?

Daniel Flück: It was in January 2006 when I was inspired by a talk of Robert Scoble about weblogs, and their growing power and interaction possibilities. After viewing this I decided to get on the boat, starting with my own ideas just about everything. Only after a while I found out, that this wasn't really what I was looking for. Browsing through some well known blogs about blogging taught me to watch out for my own niche which I could write about. And as I am colorblind myself and couldn't find anybody else writing about it, I started off with Colblindor.

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Feeling and Shaping Colors

Feeling and Shaping Colors


"Daniel sees numbers as shapes, colours and textures and can perform extraordinary maths in his head. He can also learn to speak a language fluently from scratch in a week. He has Savant Syndrome, an extremely rare form of Asperger's that gives him almost unimaginable mental powers, much like the Rain Man portrayed by Dustin Hoffman."

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I remember seeing an episode of 60 Minutes that featured Daniel Tammet, and I remember hearing something he said that struck something in me. While I'm neither a mathematical genius, nor capable of learning Icelandic in a week, he spoke about his synaesthesia, and how numbers could be ugly, or fuzzy, and he can actually paint Pi, and this was something I had thought I was previously experiencing alone.

Born on a Blue Day   His inspiring novel Born on a Blue Day serves as a unique leap into a mind no one else has.
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Colorful Beauty in Nature: Butterflies

Colorful Beauty in Nature: Butterflies


One particular place to find amazing colors in nature is the Butterfly and lucky for us there are 17,500 species of butterflies in the world.

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They use their bright colors to ward of predators by tricking them into thinking they are poisonous (some actually are) or by camouflaging themselves into plants or bigger insects.

A Collection of 18 Beautiful Butterflies & Their Color Palettes

Swallowtail Butterfly

Swallowtails again

  by Orbital Joe

Swallowtails again
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Planting the Most Powerful Color

Planting the Most Powerful Color


In the latest issue of Fine Gardening, Sydney Eddison, a colour-passionate contributor to the magazine, dispels the gardener's fear of dynamic reds by writing about the types of red in flowers, and how to use them.

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Calling attention to the assertive nature of red and how it has the power to draw the eye more than any other colour, Eddison goes on to mention that red has many faces, chief among these being cool red, true red, and warm red. Also among those three are tints, which are softer versions of their titles.

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Bring Home the Color

Bring Home the Color


Feeling a little stuck in the box? Might I suggest a pair of stylish bird scissors? Pylones is a store of ordinary items done extraordinarily, and it just might change every one of your preconceived notions concerning what kitchen utensils and office supplies should be. Bringing fun and funk together, psychedelic toasters are about the tamest of all the hand-painted products in-store and online.

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Dustpan Pair

With store locations only in Paris and New York City, I remember stepping into the one on Spring Street in Manhattan and feeling like a five-year-old again.

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Developing an Eye for Color

Developing an Eye for Color


With my nephew's room being painted a bold blue, I couldn't help but think about the development of colour vision in babies. I remember hearing that babies can't see all colours immediately, and even can't focus their eyes for the first few weeks. In fact, babies only seem to notice things that move at first because focusing takes such time and development, so mobiles and ceiling fans will keep their attention should they be awake. It takes the eyes of a baby one to two months to be able to study the parents' faces, and two more to recognise it. It's at about month four that colour starts to fade in as in adult eyes.

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Watching the Colours Change

Red/Black/White Baby Toy   The rods in the eye, the black-and-white receptors, develop first, and soon after come the cones, the receptors for colours. One of the first colours a baby can comes at about four months. The first among those colours they can see is red, and as the red cones develop the green cones are inhibited while green cones will inhibit red, and blue will inhibit both in return. Almost concurrently with red comes blue. It's like a tiny battle for the postage stamp-sized tissue in the back of your eyes. As a result, there are some baby toys out there, like this one by Manhattan Toy Co., designed specifically around this to stimulate the baby's development.

Technology has also grown with the understanding of the human eye in that televisions and monitors use red, green, and blue, just like the human eye, rather than the primary colours we all learned in elementary school.

What You Can Do

Some researchers have suggested that a babies room colours change with their eyes. While this is hard because we can't see as they do, there is a general sense that bold and bright colours will be best for the baby which means pastels, which are automatically associated with babies, don't hurt at all, but don't necessarily aid in speeding development.   Toy Pastel Room with Bears

It has been suggested that a baby's room be painted in black, white, and red in correspondence with the first developmental stage, but more importantly comes stimulating the baby with changing the exposure angles of light in moving the crib and the baby's position in the crib often. Ultimately, the baby will learn to focus on faces, on objects, and learn about the world it lives in just by being exposed to it, and every day is a brand new exposure.

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