Comic Authors Who Use Instagram To Promote And Sell Their Art


In our previous article, we suggested several platforms where graphic designers could sell their work. A big part of the contemporary design community are comic writers, and these platforms also come in handy for selling products related to your comics. This is why we decided to explore some Instagram accounts that help these authors reach a wider audience across social media, and take them to their online shops. Comic content explored here is not only funny but relatable to our personalities and also tackles some social causes that matter to the artists.

 


@punkystudio

 

Punky Studio

Punky Studio takes us on a trip that follows our main character, a cat, which explores daily challenges such as anxiety and lack of motivation. The author uses this platform to talk about mental health, and okay, an adorable dog from time to time, but this Instagram account is linked to the Etsy shop where you can buy illustrations or handmade pins about mental health. What makes this account sell is the content which speaks to the cause-driven people worldwide, but also a good brand, authentic drawing and good understanding of the Instagram audience.

 


@eckyo.me

 

eckyo.me

 

Eckyo.me advertises an online drawing course by the author Ecky O. This Instagram account buys us with adorable characters and well-developed brand, but this art of visual storytelling is used to share motivational and inspiring short stories. This account is like your daily dose of Kung Fu Panda wisdom on social media, which takes you to their website to learn how to increase your character drawing skills for improving your own work. This account is an example of using Instagram to sell education, while the shared artwork convinces you that they know what they are doing.

 


@4amshower

 

4amshower

 

4 am shower is an account that represents illustrations created by Guy Kopsombut, who tells us short stories about cute wild animals and their adventures. Every story is sharing a motivational and supporting message, making it our daily dose of cute-things-on-Instagram. For Guy to be able to tell us about love and friendship, he has to receive a lot of support from his fans around the world. Guy does this by rewarding his supporters on Patreon with prints, sketches, stickers, postcards and other perks featuring our favorite love-giving animal of the month.

 

selling art on instagram

 


@handsoffmydinosaur

 

handsoffmydinosaur

 

From a wide green sea of Instagram, a charming Greek humor finds its way to our feed. I am talking about one of the most popular designer profiles Hands Off My Dinosaur - and I do believe nobody want's to mess around with this guys dinosaur. Teo is selling, by his own words, "illustrations and stuff",  and he does it remarkably. This Instagram account will surprise you with ordinary things in out-of-the-ordinary situations, which will make you laugh till your stomach hurts. His humor is often related to food, but some interesting anthropomorphic planets, chess figures and washing machines make an appearance as well. The link on this profile takes us to his Etsy shop, where we cannot resist to cards, stickers, prints, magnets and other "stuff" we just really wanna pin to our wall and have it make our day every morning.

 


@safely_endangered

 

safelyendangered

 

Safely Endangered has been around with us for quite some time, during which it has developed a certain audience type which this account can take to the end of the world with their eyes closed. The audience to these "silly comics" are enjoying the safe environment in which they read the silly jokes which sometimes go all the way to the dark corner of our consciousness and back. Besides the usual mugs and prints, the personal website we are taken to is selling a graphic book of your favorite comics and more, using selling services such as Amazon. A very specific niche of these comics are the reason why this account has almost reached a million followers and is now selling a book worldwide.

 


@stacieswift

 

stacieswift

 

Stacie Swift, or probably the most famous Stacie on Instagram, is our next pick for designers social profiles. Stacie uses this social network to illustrate positive messages and she, just like you, identifies as a color lover! Her account is well branded with bright, chippy colors, which support the background of each post. Her mission is to make your days with awesome sense of design and comforting words, which she is now well recognized by, and most loved by those who care about their mental health. Stacie has a shop for her postcards, but also socks and other items, a personal website and a blog where she shares her thoughts. On top of all this, she also uses Patreon where most supportive fans can reach her.

 


@steinbergdrawscartoons

 

steinbergdrawscartoon

 

In our previous article, we have mentioned Society 6 as a platform for selling your design. Steinberg is one of the artist whose chose was precisely Society 6, while his Instagram account helps him reach his customers. Steinberg is a type of cartoonists we loved reading in our daily newspaper. His critics of society are funny, realistic and relatable. He usually uses simple black and white drawings to tell a story, although sometimes he cheers us up with water colored images and amazingly balanced colors, which reasure us that he knows what he's doing.

 


@there.goes.motivation

 

theregoesmotivation

 

I don't know if these full stops in the name of the account are on purpose, but they are really suiting pauses between each word, which describe the account accordingly. Backed with personal experience of a girl in the urban society, Loron really gets people involved. Her characters are also very well developed and animated-like, so we can easily see this turning into an animated show one day, with the right support. For there.goes.motivation Loron uses Patreon and exclusive perks for her most loyal supporters.

 


@relatabledoodles

 

relatabledoodles

 

Another Patreon user, Relatable Doodles are a super successful Instagram trend, presenting the type of doodles you can relate to (if the name didn't say it all). This designer tackles burning issues such as use of technology, ecology, activism and activism-wanna-be, as well as anxiety, friendship and relationship inspired topics. Cee has really made it into "creating comics on the internet" as her full time job, but she knew how to develop a responsive community around her work before asking them to pledge on Patreon and support her. A truly inspiring story of an Instagram account, from which we can all learn from.

Written by: Nina Petrov

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Interview With an Artist - Colors & Music


In our previous articles, we've talked about color and psychology, the meaning of colors in different cultures with particular attention to how colors evoke emotions. We know that music holds the same power - we are able to experience a variety of emotions by listening to music, and today we are wondering what is the connection between sounds and colors - can we connect one color with a certain sound and whether these have the same meaning when interpreted by our brains?
To discover more, we are talking to Umut Eldem, a composer, pianist, and art researcher. His main field of research is synesthesia, and he will tell us more about this curious phenomena.

 

Hi Umut! Your field of interest is synesthesia, could you tell us more about what synesthesia is and why is it so interesting for you?

Synesthesia is a neurological condition in which a person experiences multiple senses from only one sensory input. For example, along with hearing a sound, a person with synesthesia can also feel a certain taste; or while reading they can see that some letters are in different colors. What is particularly interesting for me is when people can see colors and shapes when they hear music, also called chromesthesia (sound-to-color synesthesia). Every synaesthetic person usually has their own colors they associate with different notes, letters, and so on.

 

Do we know any famous artists who had/have synesthesia?

It is known that certain composers had synesthesia, such as Olivier Messiaen, Franz Liszt, and Duke Ellington, but we didn't know much about it until recently. Now, we can do MRI scans and see that different parts of the brain are active when people with synesthesia experience an input of sound or other senses, which is different than the reaction of an average brain. Science couldn't prove it before the technology allowed us, but what is more interesting for me is to understand how these composers correlated notes they wrote and instruments they used to create music with their condition and the colors they saw. This could also help us understand their music better - the ideas they expressed and what we actually identify with.

 

Umut Eldem - photo of the artist

 

How can scientific research in this area connect with your artistic research?

There are many scientists researching synesthesia, especially cognitive scientists and neuroscientists, and what they are exploring is a more practical side of synesthesia. They are researching whether is more common to males or females, is it more common with artists, left-handed people, etc. They are trying to answer the question of why is it happening.

As an art researcher, I am looking into the ways that we can have a better understanding of the artistic manifestation of synesthesia, and how to use it to express ourselves as artists in more than one discipline. What I'm exploring is how we can use synesthesia even if we don't have it, and how an average brain connects colors and sounds. Knowing more about it can help musicians experience musical concepts of the composers they listen to better and bring the process of creating and performing music to the interdisciplinary scene.

What are you working on right now?

My current research is pointed at discovering a general theory of how we connect colors and sounds in order to develop software which can convert music into visual ideas, shapes, and colors in an intuitive way, and to use it as a tool for performing musicians. So, for example, as the violin plays, you can project the video performance which directly responds to the music played. This will, of course, be different from the audio visualizers on media players of computers, where it just mathematically connects frequencies to visuals.

I am also conducting artistic experiments where I can see how visual input affects musicians. I am adding ‘synaesthetic’ colors to their sheet music and finding out if it is easier for them to play like that, or more difficult. The practical result of this research will be to enhance music performance.

 

Do you use colors in your performances, when you play music?

Before learning about synesthesia, I didn't. But now, my interest is growing and I am implementing colors in my performances. For example, I did a performance with a narrator, which was reading a piece to the audience, and my soundscape was playing from four speakers set in the room. I used light bulbs which were connected to an app on my phone, so I was able to change the color of the lights based on the tone of the story and also the sound, integrate different colors in different parts of the text.

Performance “Prelude”

 

How did the audience relate to this piece?

The thing is, when you present an audio-visual piece, music, and colors together, the audience will usually find it pleasurable as long as they roughly go along together, so it is difficult to understand these sensations deeply. However, I have received comments from the audience that they did find harmony in the way the lights were responding to the music and the story, and connect to the story on a new level.

Although, what is much more interesting for me, as I said before, is to have a video that responds to live music in an intuitive way to our perception. This might be a new way of experiencing music.

What kind of artistic experiments do you do?

What is interesting for me to work with is improvisation. I like to see how a musician plays a "red triangle" for example. If they see shapes changing on the screen, how will a pianist, a violinist, and a drummer react to these shapes as they change? For me, as an observer, this reaction of music to visual art has an aesthetic value, but for the musicians, it has an insightful significance - by doing this they discover more about themselves and how they correlate visual ideas with the music and which aspect of music they will turn to.

 

Melissa Mccracken Synesthesia examples

 

How is synesthetic art different for musicians and visual artists?

Visual art is usually stationary, comparing to music when we talk about paintings for example. There is a static image that we process in our own time and have an individual experience, while music is a more temporal process and we all have the same time to experience it. When a classic artist responds to music visually, they are putting music into one frame. There are synesthetic painters who draw the music they hear, such as contemporary Melissa McCracken. When you are a visual artist with chromesthesia, it is easier to express it because you already see colors and you are creating a visual output. It is also easier for the audience to relate to the synesthesia of a visual artist, but for music, it often requires an explanation or an additional dimension, like a visual element to realize the synesthetic potential of the music.

Visual artists are very inspired by music. Is it a myth that they spontaneously reflect what they hear?

I would say that it depends on the artist, but we all have the ability to connect what we experience between different senses, with or without synaesthesia. We are all reflecting differently, it is all very idiosyncratic. With synaesthetic people, everyone has their own color for the same source, and you will usually get something different. The interesting thing is that even though we always react to music in our own way, there is still a pattern in the big picture. Our experience is unique, but there is a general tendency of people to connect music and art in the same way. For example, we tend to combine warmer colors with fast, happy, exciting music, while we combine colder colors with the opposite- slow and sad. I immediately think of the ‘Blues’ music genre. I believe that the biggest value of my research is understanding this general tendency in combining visuals and music in creating something unique.

What is next that is coming up?

Next week I am delivering a workshop as a part of my project "Drawn to music", as a part of the project week NextDoors, in Royal Conservatoire of Antwerp, in Belgium. There will be musicians playing in response to visual art, but also the musicians that will draw what they hear. This two-way process will repeat itself and we will see how artists react visually to music and musically to visuals.

 

If you want to contact Umut and give your input to his research or ask him about it, you can reach him by email. You can also find him on soundcloud.

Umut’s lecture on synesthesia you can find on youtube.

 

Author: Nina Petrov

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What Is Internet of Things? What You Should Know Ahead of the IoT World Congress in Barcelona


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Between October 16 and 18, Barcelona will host IoT World Congress to shed more light on the topic, investment opportunities, and its future. The event will feature multiple activities including awards and workshops.

Technology and IoT

What is Internet of Things? Has technology affected the human understanding of IoT? What is the future of IoT? These are some of the vital questions to ask yourself ahead of the 2018 IoT World Congress in Barcelona. The event, which will see the Top Internet of Things Companies meet between 16th and 18th October, will focus on aspects affected by IoT. Such areas include transport, manufacturing, infrastructure development, energy, and healthcare.

While the Barcelona event will focus on IoT, technology is the mastermind behind it. Just like technology has revolutionized nearly all aspects of human lives, it has brought massive opportunities regarding devices interconnections. For instance, it is easy to access cheap wireless networks or processors, which are vital in IoT. But even as the Top Internet of Things Companies are set to meet between 16th and 18th October, one question remains challenging to most people: What is Internet of Things? Below is what you should know about IoT ahead of the Barcelona event.

What Is Internet of Things?

IoT is the interconnection between billions of devices globally, which can collect and share data. These devices are physical, and range from tiny objects like pills to large objects like airplanes, and are interconnected via the internet. Over recent years, IoT devices have been growing in number owing to the reducing cost of wireless networks and processors. According to Statista, an estimated 25 billion devices will be part of IoT devices by 2020. The figure is massive compared to the 4.88 billion devices that were interconnected in 2015.

Impact of IoT

The effect of the internet of things revolves around all aspects of human lives. Think of a smartphone app that can control your thermostat or coffee maker that switches on automatically when you get out of bed. Indeed, controlling your thermostat temperature or coffee maker is an easy task for you. But wouldn't this automation help eliminate the stresses and effort involved by humans? There are nearly endless examples since Top Internet of Things Companies are involved in most areas of people's lives. Ultimately, this invention results in smart homes and workplaces.

The Future of IoT

There is much discussion revolving around the future of internet of things. As the rate of data sharing between physical devices increases, and the Top Internet of Things Companies ramp up their operations, it is easy to foresee a bright future for IoT. For instance, you may end up with a freezer that can remind you to buy perishables through RFID Product Chips scanning. Automatic opening of your garage door, whenever you want to drive through, might be another example. There are many examples; IoT will be a focus in the tech space, leading to substantive development in how we do things.

 

MD: Between October 16 and 18, Barcelona will host IoT World Congress to shed more light on the topic, investment opportunities, and its future. The event will feature multiple activities including awards and workshops.

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Stefan Saigmeister - The happy designer


If this is the first time you hear about Stefan, it is our pleasure to introduce you to this genius designer, artist, storyteller and your future work guru. Sagmeister is a New-York based artist and co-founder of the Sagmeister & Walsh creative agency in New York City.

 

https://bit.ly/2xRxSWQ

 

Stefan's life dream was to combine two of his passions - music and design. This led him to a journey of working on projects for Rolling Stones, Lou Reed, Jay Z and many other big names in the music industry. His designs of album covers are poetically responding to the music, his sensibility has made this work extraordinary, and his clients ultimately satisfied. He is a true example of a passionate artist who sees design as much more than his career and profession.

 

In fact, what is even more interesting than his work - is his work philosophy, the way he unlocks creativity and keeps his passion for design alive. As a Ted Talk speaker, he brings us his working model and tells us what truly inspires him in talks "Happiness by design", "Things I've learned in my life so far", "The power of time off" and "7 rules for making more happiness”.

 

https://bit.ly/2IjzH3v

 

In his talks, he reveals his point of view on how happiness is significantly different from the visualization of happiness, how the feeling of joy is connected to design and how design of objects can give us pleasure. If we look at things we enjoy the most, design and function of objects we use has an important role in how much we enjoy a certain activity. Visual happiness has been used lately in a cynical way, as showing happiness and awaking the experience of happiness are two completely different acts.

 

Saigmeister explores the relationship between design and happiness, and while learning new tools, ideas, techniques and inspiring quotes, he creates graphic design art pieces to give credits to these truths about him - sentences like "Money does not make me happy", "Worrying solves nothing", "Having guts always works out for me". He is presenting, from his own example, how the true inspiration for his work lies in his life experiences and the inner thoughts about life itself. These art pieces were created for clients, and while searching for inspiration to answer a task in his profession, he discovered that the answer was already hiding in his diaries and these ideas were waiting to be explored and turned into art and design.

 

His work is focused on record labels, but also magazines, culture facilities, while his collective of designers also exhibits their work in galleries, public spaces, projected videos in art spaces. His statement "Having a diary supports personal development" came out as something he's concluded about himself, and eventually it was presented to the world as an amazing combination of tools explored to create a film and animation, with purpose to share this idea. These statements sometimes end up on billboards, such as "Complaining is silly. Either act or forget." which was placed on a rooftop of their gallery in New York, and for the materials they choose to work with newsprint and stencils on the newsprint. As the sun was changing the color of the newsprint to yellow, they removed the stencil and shipped the print to Lisbon where they placed this work on a billboard. Three weeks later, the sunlight faded the sentence and the billboard turned to yellow completely.

 

https://bit.ly/2N7t19p

 

He is also an intriguing individual who created a documentary film about seeking his own happiness and fulfillment, titled "The happy designer". For this film they used natural elements in Bali, bananas, trees, animals and tree climbing, which made the design elements of the film much more interesting and different than everything you've seen so far. Behind this film lies a lot of research around the topic, which shows how much people's happiness depends on social interactions with other people and their loved ones.

 

The highlight of his work and philosophy is, without any doubt, the policy to take time off work for the entire year, every eight years. His studio shuts down for the year, while they experiment, relax, develop a creative lab of just letting their imagination grow and create stunning designs. He seeks this inspiration in nature, just as his film was created during his time off at Bali, and during this period they also built furniture for the studio, inspired by the wild nature as well as the culture and craft practices of Bali.

 

He claims that his sabbaticals are of high importance for his creative work, that taking time off unlocked the creative potential and enabled the time to meditate, read, explore, play and gather inspiration for the next eight years to follow. His book "Things I Have Learned in My Life So Far" is published and can be purchased online.

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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Transcending colors through cultures


Joshua Strydom is a Zimbabwean artist, photographer and print maker, whose work is engaging differences between cultures through visual vocabulary. While traveling, he is exploring cultures, variety of folklore and traditions, and trying to connect the opposites by mediating through art.

 

His work is strongly inspired by African cultures, while there is a narrative in his art pieces which speaks about history, mythology and cultural values. Patterns and colors in his prints are often dedicated to the geographic specifics of the culture he is inspired by.

 

His series of prints, "Dzizi", "Nzou", and "Duiker", is inspired by old Zimbabwean sayings, traditional words of wisdom passed on from generation to generation. The original idea for these prints was to use black, as he wanted to give power to these statements he was presenting, but because he did not want black to be connected to Africa as "the black continent", black was excluded from the color choice. The final choice of color ended up being a mix of purple, red and a little bit of black, which is a color associated with the color of the African soil.

 

 

"Dzizi" is telling us behind the scenes story about rebellion and speaking for oneself, while it also explains how it was once thought that owls have horns and they were traditionally considered to bring death. On the top of the picture there is a tree and a climber - this rapresentation is coming from a saying that the fruit on the ground belongs to everyone, but the fruit on the tree is for the one who can climb.

 

 

"Nzou" is showing as an image of an elephant. Elephant is a totem animal for some members of the tribe, which means that their ancestor's souls are in elephants, and so these members of the tribe are not allowed to eat elephants. Although the head of the tribe is allowed to enjoy the meat of the elephant, everyone else is not. In the second plan you can see the image of a leopard, illustrating what we can learn from nature in differences between hyenas and leopards - that the numbers can overpower the strength.

 

 

"Duiker" is the third print in this collection, also based on old African sayings, all inspired by nature and natural circumstances, especially animal life. Even though the chosen color truly agrees with the stories and meanings behind these art peaces, it is interesting how in reaching this shade, the primary choice had to be excluded from the options, to give space for creativity to bring the adequate solution.

 

Following series of art pieces is "Anansi ne rwaivhi", which is a story folded in a specific way, inspired by the chameleon and the sayings about the chameleon in Africa. Artist's vision for this piece was to not make it monochromatic, but to show the main characteristic of a chameleon, which is the ability to change colors.

 

The colors are changing and melting into one another, and variety of saturation and vibration of different colors is present. The images used for this print are images of nature, inspired by the grass, the soil, the chameleons transformations. There is a progression from the last page of the book to the beginning, where while colors interflow throughout the pages, the very first page of the book is merging all the colors and shades at once, presenting this astonishing ability of chameleons.

 

Joshua is a paper maker and a print maker, he makes paper out of elephant's feces and all of his work requires a lot of time and dedication. His work is mostly inspired by nature and cultures he crosses paths with. The process of eco printing for him starts by taking pictures of interesting occurrences in nature, and then keeping the original shapes from the picture, transferring these impressions and experience to the paper.

 

Other techniques he is working with are using etching press, silk printing, screen printing, lithography, and others. His recent work is a screen print inspired by a poem about personality of the wind. It is a collaboration with Milena Brkić, during an art residency in Serbia, organized by inspiring change.

 

From an interesting conversation with Joshua, we discovered how, in art world, some colors are present because some had to be excluded from the palette, while sometimes it is a case of having to include specific colors and trying to find a way for all of them to co-exist in an art piece, like in the "Anansi ne rwaivhi" book.

 

 

You can find more about Joshua's work on his webpage http://joshuastrydom.com and Instagram profile  @strydzo_dzos

All the photos are taken from Joshua's site.

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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Camille Walala: Colorful art inspired by African tribes


PRINT - DESIGN - INTERIORS... three keywords that best describe Camille's work and life.

 

 

 

Her work is easily recognizable and inspiring. The color combinations she uses are lively and playful and her unique style is influenced by the African tribes and the Memphis Movement from the 80’s. She personally describes it as TribalPop.

 

 

About Camille

A graduate in textile design from the University of Brighton, Camille Walala established her studio and brand in East London in 2009, and has since evolved from textile-based work to art direction, interior design and large-scale civic art and installation projects.

 

 

Drawing on influences including the Memphis Movement, the Ndebele tribe and Victor Vasarely, Walala has an irrepressible enthusiasm for playful, graphic patterns that invoke a smile. Her dedication to positivity, optimistic typography and bold use of pattern and colour have seen her transform urban landscapes across the world, and earned her clients ranging from Converse and Armani to Nintendo and Facebook.

 

 

Follow Camille's work: websiteInstagram

 

 

What do you think of Camille's art? Does it inspire you? Does it make you happy? Let us know in the comments.

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Alexander Khokhlov: Not an ordinary dog lover


Alexander Khokhlov is a photographer based in Moscow, Russia. He's a self-taught photographer that started his career in 2008 as an event and reportage photographer. Most of all he likes to recreate ideas of make-up transformations. He is well-known for his illusionary artworks such as "Weird Beauty" or "2D or not 2D series". Besides art, his great passion is dog photography! In a big project called "The Dog Show", his wife Veronica Ershova and him tried to show both the beauty of the breed and personality of a dog in order to explore the wonderful world of our four-legged friends.



They started the project in 2017 and since then dozens of dogs have taken part in it. Each of them is unique, and that is what they try to show in their photos. Alexander and Veronica are very proud that the series was awarded by the famous international competitions: PDN Faces 2017 (Animal Portraits, Winner), Moscow International Foto Awards 2018 (Photographers of the Year, Nature category), Prix De La Photographie Paris 2017 (Silver, Nature/Domestic Animals), Tokyo International Foto Awards 2018 (Bronze, Nature/Pets).



Alexander worked with brands like Four Seasons, Hilton Bankside, SVA Zürich, and Solid Gold Pet.



He was interviewed and featured in CNN, Town & Country, PDN Magazine, Scientific American MIND, Professional Photographer, Talk Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Mail, Wired, Life magazine, Phlearn.com and others.
Make sure to explore other project that Alexander worked on, including the one "Like human, like pet" which behind the scene you can see here.

Connect with Alexander on social media: Instagram

 

 

What inspires you about Alexander's art? The unique perspective he gives to the ordinary topics? The beautiful lighting that he uses? The whole world of imagination he manages to give life to? Let us know in the comments.

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Ben O'Brien: Who is Ben The Illustrator?


The first artist in our "Featured artist" series is Ben The Illustrator!

Ben started exploring the world of illustration more than ten years ago. If someone knows what it means to be earning a living as a self-employed artist/business owner, he's the one to ask!

 

 

He currently specializes in travel and indoors illustrations but his portfolio is full of various work - from editorial illustrations to package designs. The colors he uses in his art are vivid and joyful and make his work easily recognizable.

 

 

Originally focusing on animation, Ben has always been obsessed with creating colourful things.  His first work was making independent music videos, which grew into creative direction on children's TV and advertising before an epiphany lead him to discover that illustration was the path for him.  Since then he has illustrated ad campaigns for Smart Cars and Berri Fruit Juice in Australia, worked on editorials for The Guardian, The New York Times and Buzzfeed, and created illustrations for everything from shoes to coffee packaging, record sleeves to X-Box Games.

 

 

He illustrates places; from cafe interiors and work spaces to busy cities and national landmarks.  He is hugely inspired by travel, the culture of people going from one place to the next and the changing nature, architecture and lighting.  His key inspirations have always been colourful, Pop Art and Graffiti, food packaging, pop music videos, street wear, Mid Century textiles and furniture and futuristic architecture.

 

 

Ben did an interesting research this year about illustrators, who they are, what they do, and how much they really earn. The results might surprise you. For all interested to find out more, check out this infographic on his website.

Connect with Ben on social media: TwitterInstagram

What inspires you about Ben's art? The unique simplicity of his artwork that has the power to say more with less? Is it the beautiful color combinations he uses? Let us know in the comments.

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