The Science of Scrub Colours


scrub suit

Have you ever known that the colour uniform you wear can make a difference to your day? Whether you’re a doctor in men’s scrubs or a nurse in a women’s scrub set, the colour of your scrubs possesses power! Empower yourself by choosing the right shade of scrubs to suit your needs.

 

Pink Scrubs

When I think pink, I think fuzzy and sweet; like cotton candy or soft, cozy bunny slippers. What comes to mind when you think of pink scrubs? Pink nursing scrubs denote friendliness, empathy, compassion and love. Pink scrubs give off calm, loving vibes.

Ciel Scrubs

We’re talking professional here. I mean, like seriously classic. That’s what ciel scrubs are all about. Nurses in ciel scrubs make a professional, yet approachable impression, and are often generous and loyal.

Red Scrubs

Okay, so not many nurses go for red scrubs, because, well, blood. But those who do are passionate people who possess a love of life, remarkable inner strength, and a go-getter mentality.

Black Scrubs

A nurse clad in black is a nurse you just don’t mess with. Not because she’s mean, per se, but perhaps because she can be a bit intimidating at times. She’s authoritative, efficient, and can take charge of any situation. She has the makings of a dignified and capable leader.

Orange Scrubs

Okay, so orange scrubs aren’t that common. We know that, and we’ll tell you why: Girls who’d choose orange scrubs usually don’t end up wearing scrubs at all. They’re curious, fun-loving party people who love drama and aren’t afraid of anything. Since they love happy, fun and easy jobs, and are often not as hardworking as others, they don’t usually opt for nursing as their career path in life.

Purple Scrubs

Purple scrub wearers are deep, dignified and more introverted. They are sometimes quite talented, with the ability to draw, paint, and play music. They have a reserved, dignified presence.

Green Scrubs

If your favorite colour is green, you are likely to lead an active public life. You are pretty intelligent and refreshingly kindhearted, and people feel calm and cared for around you.

 

Scrub colours don’t only provide clues to a nurse’s personality; they can also help nurses make the right impression, and can impact your behavior so that you’ll act more like a nurse who loves that colour. If you’d like to look the part of a calm and caring, intelligent nurse, go for green, and if you’re interested in letting your sweet, girly side shine through, think pink.

 

Choose the right colours and set the tone for a job well done!

 

 

 

 

Bio:
Paul Priceman is a passionate male nurse advocate both in his personal life and professionally with Murse World. Priceman works tirelessly works to promote male nurses in the US and worldwide. He is also involved in researching and writing about various different fascinating and intriguing healthcare related topics. In his spare time, he enjoys skiing in the winter, swimming in the summer and daydreaming all year round. 

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4 Comments
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Just fyi, the color of blue scrubs is called "ciel". Not "ceil".
A quick google search shows that many people seem unable to spell it properly, but this is a site about color and design, so maybe get the names of colors right on it.
Professionalism and all of that.

Also, thanks for this entirely pointless little piece of drivel.
Team
Hi YersiniaP! Thank you for your concern and help. I've updated the article. I suppose the word "ciel" comes from Spanish.

I actually liked a slightly different perspective on color and the discussion on how it's been used in a different niche. But then again, not all the articles will be everyone's cup of tea. Feel free to browse the other categories. Our blog is full of material. I'm sure you'll find something you like.
My main issue with the article is that I thought the title was very misleading.

"The Science of Scrub Colours" made me expect an article on the reasons why certain colors are used for scrubs, and others aren't.
You, know, the "science" behind it.

What I got instead was a cutesy fluffy piece full of pseudo-color psychology, that I would have expected to see in a shallow entertainment magazine, but not a site devoted to colors.
Maybe that's why I reacted in a not very nice way when I found the spelling error.

Anyway, thanks for your reply, and I am Aware that there's other (better?), entries in the blog! :)

editorCL wrote:
Hi YersiniaP! Thank you for your concern and help. I've updated the article. I suppose the word "ciel" comes from Spanish.

I actually liked a slightly different perspective on color and the discussion on how it's been used in a different niche. But then again, not all the articles will be everyone's cup of tea. Feel free to browse the other categories. Our blog is full of material. I'm sure you'll find something you like.
Team
Thank you for the feedback! I will have that in mind when approving future articles.

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