From "Jeff Job Hunter" to a well-known illustrator: interview with Jack Teagle


1. What was the thing or who was the person that helped your career the most? In what way?

Nobrow. They published one of my comics and it pushed me to jump into self-employment.
I worked on a comic for them called "Jeff Job Hunter" while I was unemployed, and it helped me to find freelance work.
I got a variety of work off of the back of projects I made with them.

 

 

2. We could say you're a famous artist now. Could you tell us about your struggles to get here? What were the challenges? What were the hardships?

As you start to make a name for yourself, a lot of people want your time and attention, but without paying for it.
It's learning when to step away and when you can tell someone is trying to string you along and waste your time.
There still are hardships, to keep consistent money coming in.
I'm too trusting of people. Especially with freelance, give someone an inch, and they'll take a mile.
You need to have contracts written out to protect yourself. Good communication with a client is very important. Some can be very difficult to get a straight answer out of!

3. Was it worth it? What would you have done differently?

Yes, it was definitely worth it. It's extremely rewarding to be creating things to your best ability every day and pleasing clients, as well as fans.
It feels good to make people happy.
I would have told myself to stop making comics a few years earlier when interest started to fade. I'd also tell myself not to do favours.
Don't treat clients like friends. You have to treat it like a business. When you start being friendly, people walk all over you.
Keeping all of that in mind, you can have a very happy, healthy career.

4. If you could give an advice to aspiring artists trying to make it, what would that be?

Don't work for free. There will always be work around the corner. You may think this is your big opportunity and you won't work again, but it's not true.
Your time is the most valuable thing you have, so be vigilant and plan how you want to build your career, and what you want to do. Basically, work smart, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by planning well.
Always focus. Don't try to think too much like an artist, but more like it's a regular job. Just focus on doing the best you can, and if there are imperfections, it doesn't matter, move on. As an illustrator, you want to make a living from this. You're not setting out to make masterpieces (unless of course, you want to create personal artwork in your own time).

To see more of Jack's work, please visit his website and his Behance profile.

What have you learned from Jack's experience COLOURlovers? Has it been useful? Is there something similar that you've experienced you'd like to share with the community?


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3 Comments
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Hmmm... Jack really drives home the point that your work is your mainstay, time is not free and clients are not friends. Sounds like he has been through it all!
Nice interview! Thank you!

Su
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suruha wrote:
Hmmm... Jack really drives home the point that your work is your mainstay, time is not free and clients are not friends. Sounds like he has been through it all!
Nice interview! Thank you!

Su

Thank you for the comment Su, you noticed this really well. I wish if we could all as artists remember this more often.

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