COLOURlovers Creative Guide: Advanced Palette Making & Color Theory

COLOURlovers Creative Guide: Advanced Palette Making & Color Theory


The magic of palette design here on COLOURlovers has been a mystery to some for far too long. While many of you have figured it out beyond the Basic Palette Maker, some of you have taken a glance at COPASO or PHOTOCOPA and run for the hills. I promise, they aren't that difficult to master!

Share this Post Pin It

While both COPASO and PHOTOCOPA are excellent for more complex palette making, understanding the difference between the two and knowing when to use what, will definitely change the way you go about making palettes.

When I first saw these two palette making tools, I thought to myself, "gee, they seem a bit redundant. I can load an image in to both, I can pick colors from an image in both and I can do varied widths in both..... so what's the difference?!" Well I'll tell you, there is a whole lot of difference between the two!

compare_smallvisual_COPASO-PHOTOCOPA

I don't know about you, but I see many images floating around in the physical world as well as the digital world, that simply inspire me and I want to keep the reflection of those hues in the compartment of my brain where I keep inspiration.

If an image has, let's say, sparked inspiration to create a palette, but not in the literal sense, then hop right over to COPASO. Why? Because it's a total workspace to get your thoughts out and track the process. Altering and perfecting color variations and holding possibilities in the sidelines, is what COPASO does best. From multiple images, personal note-taking, a scratch-pad, in-site search ranges and a slew of color theory mixing tools you really cannot go wrong.

However, there are particular needs to create palettes in direct relationship with an image this is PHOTOCOPA's strong suite. For example, I have written a number of blog posts recently, that are primary examples of when to use PHOTOCOPA. My Avengers 2 blog post, refers to quite a variety of palettes related to the hero's. Not all the palettes I list, were created using PHOTOCOPA, but they probably should have been, keep that in mind.

Here is a perfect example: when I searched COLOURlovers for my post about the Game of Thrones and color palettes in reference to the shows characters, most of the palettes I saw don't visually match how I see the character in my memory.

But a lightbulb goes on when I look at this palette titled, "Sansa Stark" (by haute1couture). Why is this?

Sansa_Stark

example_PHOTOCOPA1

There is a reason, the word "PHOTO" is found in the name, PHOTOCOPA. If you're wanting to quite literally choose exact colors from an image or photo, you'll most certainly want to utilize the featured tools of PHOTOCOPA.

example_ImageonCLFurthermore, when you use PHOTOCOPA and load an image in to it yourself, your image is available to anyone else using PHOTOCOPA to create palettes from. You will see in the example (above screenshot) of Sansa Stark, two palettes were made from the member who loaded the image in (haute1couture), but another one was made by a different member (image source link to screenshot page).

You can see different palettes made with the images by clicking on the image on the Palette Profile Page, give it a try!

Without making you wait even longer, here is the video covering the differences between the two amazing web-apps as well as an in depth look at the specific features of each.

Watch this VIDEO: Advanced Palette Making on COLOURlovers using COPASO & PHOTOCOPA

Much of the video covers the specific tools in COPASO and their relation and usage to Color Theory. The length is considerably due to going in to much of the details of each COPASO and then PHOTOCOPA.

If you missed the previous Creative Guide Series, Basic Palette Making on COLOURlovers, you can find the starter video here

Header Palette Credit:
Faded_Ends★


Related Articles

16 Comments
Showing 1 - 16 of 16 Comments
Thank you, Molly! Nice job.....Sue
Team
:)
paintglass wrote:
Thank you, Molly! Nice job.....Sue
The fact that my palette was used for the header is amazing! ヽ(^◇^*)/
Team
haha :) glad you enjoyed that.
Cinnamon Apples wrote:
The fact that my palette was used for the header is amazing! ヽ(^◇^*)/
Thanks so much, Molly- I've fielded a lot of questions about how to use these tools over the years. I especially appreciate that you made such a great video; explaining to people how and where to set their widths has proven to be a real challenge.

It's really great to have such a great resource to point people towards. :)
Thanks for explaining the scratch box. I didn't know how to use it at all. I prefer PHOTOCOPA for picture-inspired palettes too, partially because it's easier for others to use the image for their palettes too if they want to.
Team
Wonderful! I'm glad to be of help! :)

Yes they both truly have value, it just depends on your initial purpose. I think if more people used the appropriate tools it would be more socially valuable, i.e. the photos being added.

Lovely Lakes wrote:
Thanks for explaining the scratch box. I didn't know how to use it at all. I prefer PHOTOCOPA for picture-inspired palettes too, partially because it's easier for others to use the image for their palettes too if they want to.
Team
awesome! Yes I know some of you have spend countless hours helping others. Your efforts are so appreciated.
:)

praxicalidocious wrote:
Thanks so much, Molly- I've fielded a lot of questions about how to use these tools over the years. I especially appreciate that you made such a great video; explaining to people how and where to set their widths has proven to be a real challenge.

It's really great to have such a great resource to point people towards. :)
Nice post Molly :)

A note on the tagging in the haute1couture example palette:

The entered tags:
Game of Thrones

are treated as 3 separate tags (separate, alphabetized with capitalized tags first):
Game, Thrones, of

If you click on any of the tags the search results are for that word alone. Click on "Game" and all the palettes with the tag "Game" will be found. These palettes may or may not apply to the Game of Thrones. If someone tagged their palette as Head Game, or Golf Game, these palettes would show up in the search.

A more effective method for tagging would be to enter another tag and separate with a comma:
Game of Thrones, Sansa Stark

The system then groups the words and would display "Game of Thrones" and "Sansa Stark" as two separate tags that would likely improve search results.
Another great video Molly! The one thing I always have to remember with using both Photocopa and Copaso is that the colours will look "lighter" against the black background while you're working and "darker" against the white background when you publish. You often don't get an accurate sense of what the finished palette will look like until you publish it, so it's good then to be able to go back and "tweak" it sometimes:)
Thanks for making these videos. It's always interesting to see another's take on a subject. I especially enjoyed the blending tool demo in Copaso, which I've never used before. I normally use Copaso for the IFRC challenges to find colors with the keyword option or looking for colors in a certain range. And I too, never really used the scratch box in either Copaso or Photocopa
Thank you for this video, Molly! I find that searching for photos on FLICKR, which is an option in PHOTOCOPA, is not available now. But I'm not sure if I am the only one who has this problem. Could you please tell me?
I can get it to work...always a " bad response" message! ):

scovanessa wrote:
Thank you for this video, Molly! I find that searching for photos on FLICKR, which is an option in PHOTOCOPA, is not available now. But I'm not sure if I am the only one who has this problem. Could you please tell me?
That's why? I noticed a difference but didn't notice the obvious! (: Thanks, Luna, Sue

Luna Rosa wrote:
Another great video Molly! The one thing I always have to remember with using both Photocopa and Copaso is that the colours will look "lighter" against the black background while you're working and "darker" against the white background when you publish. You often don't get an accurate sense of what the finished palette will look like until you publish it, so it's good then to be able to go back and "tweak" it sometimes:)
I miss you, Molly. You posted great content.

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Search The Blog

Subscribe & Share

Our Latest Tweets

Attention #colourlovers: "Birds were made in heaven" https://t.co/XqDuY7CnNX
about 22 hours ago
Tweet this ArticleFollow @COLOURlovers

Latest Blog Posts

//View More ›

Tags

Latest Colors

//View More ›

Latest Palettes

//View More ›

Latest Patterns

//View More ›