The Fruits Books

If you have any eye for the radically strange side of fashion, you’ve surely already heard of the brightly colored trends from Tokyo’s Harajuku district (not to mention, we’ve posted about them in the past!). Of course, it was inevitable that someone would document such a memorable phenomenon, and while several books have come out on the topic, one in particular is a true standout.

Called Fruits, this series of books by Shoichi Aoki has captured the look of the kids that frequent Harajuku, but it’s also gone a step further to find out a bit more about them in the form of easily readable stats on the bottom of each page. For this reader, it’s even more interesting to find out tidbits of information about the kids that spend three hours dying their hair turquoise and making their own costumes than it is to see what they’re wearing. What kind of music do they listen to? Who are their fashion idols?

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[tobze]

The key to Fruits-inspired fashion is color, and a lot of it. The young men and women who embody the true spirit of the fashion movement purposely mismatch prints and colors and wear many layers of clothing. The inspiration of the look gave musicia Gwen Stefani the idea to create her own fashion line, Harajuku Lovers, which promotes a more wearable version of the look with thin tees, oversized tops and bright knits.

Check out a few more of the vivid styles of Harajuku’s proud residents below. You can also buy the books here.

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[Takadanobaba Kurazawa]

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[Rosino]

Harajuku_2Harajuku_Candy

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[Scion Cho]

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[antwerpenR]
Pop_Street_CultureNeon_Gothic

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[kirainet]

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[.mushi king]

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[jaybergensen]

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[Stefan]

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[base nroll]

[Header photo Via colodio]

Colette has written for a number of video game websites including Gamasutra, Kotaku, and Destructoid and co-hosted one hundred episodes of gaming podcast RetroforceGo! She also founded her own collectible toy culture blog in 2008, Tomopop.com, which has since served the needs of over 2 million plastic-obsessed readers.