Color Inspiration:  New Seven Wonders of the World

Color Inspiration: New Seven Wonders of the World


Out with the old and in with the new... After one-hundred-million votes from two-hundred countries, we have a new list of the world's Seven Wonders. All of the new wonders share a common old world feel with from very warm-colored stones with which they were constructed. These inspirational colors stand out against the sky and earth that surround them.

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The Great Wall of China 

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China was built, rebuilt, and maintained between the 5th century BC and the 16th century to protect the northern borders of the Chinese Empire. It linked existing fortifications into a united defense system to better keep invading Mongol tribes out of China. It is the largest man-made monument ever to have been built and it is disputed that it is the only one visible from space. Many thousands of people must have given their lives to build this colossal construction.

Great Wall of China

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Petra Treasury 

Petra, Jordan

On the edge of the Arabian Desert, Petra was the glittering capital of the Nabataean empire of King Aretas IV (9 B.C. to 40 A.D.). Masters of water technology, the Nabataeans provided their city with great tunnel constructions and water chambers. A theater, modelled on Greek-Roman prototypes, had space for an audience of 4,000. Today, the Palace Tombs of Petra, with the 42-meter-high Hellenistic temple facade on the El-Deir Monastery, are impressive examples of Middle Eastern culture.

Petra Treasury

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Christ, the Redeemer 

Christ, the Redeemer

This statue of Jesus stands some 38 meters tall, atop the Corcovado mountain overlooking Rio de Janeiro. Designed by Brazilian Heitor da Silva Costa and created by French sculptor Paul Landowski, it is one of the world’s best-known monuments. The statue took five years to construct and was inaugurated on October 12, 1931. It has become a symbol of the city and of the warmth of the Brazilian people, who receive visitors with open arms.

Christ the Redeemer

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Machu Picchu 

Machu Picchu

In the 15th century, the Incan Emperor Pachacútec built a city in the clouds on the mountain known as Machu Picchu ("old mountain"). This extraordinary settlement lies halfway up the Andes Plateau, deep in the Amazon jungle and above the Urubamba River. It was probably abandoned by the Incas because of a smallpox outbreak and, after the Spanish defeated the Incan Empire, the city remained 'lost' for over three centuries. It was rediscovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911.

Machu Picchu

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Chichén Itzá 

Chichén Itzá

Chichén Itzá, the most famous Mayan temple city, served as the political and economic center of the Mayan civilization. Its various structures - the pyramid of Kukulkan, the Temple of Chac Mool, the Hall of the Thousand Pillars, and the Playing Field of the Prisoners – can still be seen today and are demonstrative of an extraordinary commitment to architectural space and composition. The pyramid itself was the last, and arguably the greatest, of all Mayan temples.

Chichén Itzá

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Colosseum 

The Roman Colosseum

This great amphitheater in the centre of Rome was built to give favors to successful legionnaires and to celebrate the glory of the Roman Empire. Its design concept still stands to this very day, and virtually every modern sports stadium some 2,000 years later still bears the irresistible imprint of the Colosseum's original design. Today, through films and history books, we are even more aware of the cruel fights and games that took place in this arena, all for the joy of the spectators.

Roman Colosseum

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Taj Mahal 

Taj Mahal

This immense mausoleum was built on the orders of Shah Jahan, the fifth Muslim Mogul emperor, to honor the memory of his beloved late wife. Built out of white marble and standing in formally laid-out walled gardens, the Taj Mahal is regarded as the most perfect jewel of Muslim art in India. The emperor was consequently jailed and, it is said, could then only see the Taj Mahal out of his small cell window.

Taj Mahal

 
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Five Other Finalist Wonders

There were 13 other finalists that didn't quite make the New 7 Wonders list... but they're still pretty wonderful and we chose 5 of them for some more color palette inspiration.

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Statues of Easter Island, Chile 

Statues of Easter Island

Moai are stone statues on Rapa Nui / Easter Island, Chile. The statues are all monolithic, that is, carved in one piece. The largest moai erected, "Paro", was almost 10 metres (33 feet) high and weighed 75 tonnes (74 Imperial tonnes, 83 American tonnes). One unfinished sculpture has been found that would have been 21 metres (69 ft) tall and would have weighed about 270 tons. Almost all follow a particular style with a disproportionately large head.

Easter Island Statue

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The Eiffel Tower 

Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower is an iron tower built on the Champ de Mars beside the River Seine in Paris, France. It is the tallest structure in Paris and one of the most recognized monuments in the world. Named after its designer, engineer Gustave Eiffel, 6,719,200 people visited the tower in 2006 and more than 200,000,000 since its construction. Including the 24 metres (79 ft) antenna, the structure is 324 metres (1,063 ft) high since 2000, which is equivalent to about 81 levels in a conventional building.

Eiffel Tower

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Statue of Liberty 

Statue of Liberty

Liberty Enlightening the World, known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty, is a large statue that was presented to the United States by France in 1886, standing at Liberty Island, New York in the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all visitors, immigrants, and returning Americans. The copper-clad statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, commemorates the centennial of the United States and is a gesture of friendship from France to America.

Statue of Liberty

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Stonehenge 

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 13 kilometres (8 miles) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous prehistoric sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large standing stones. Archaeologists believe the standing stones were erected around 2200 BC and the surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC.

Stonehenge

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Pyramids of Giza 

Pyramids of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is believed to have been built as a tomb for Fourth dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu and constructed over a 20 year period concluding around 2560 BC. .

Pyramids of Giza

 
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The New 7 Wonders campaign was organized by New7Wonders Foundation. Here are all the New 7 Wonders and Finalists.


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9 Comments
Showing 1 - 9 of 9 Comments
Here's one that I made. It might not have been on either the finalist list or the final results, but New York City -- particularly Manhattan and Brooklyn -- is my wonder of the world.

Manhattan Skyline

I'd be curious to see what places other lovers wonder about, and consider to be beautiful and marvelous.
How are the pyramids not still a 7 wonder.
It is AMAZING that they were able to build such a large structure during that time period. The statue of Christ is quite impressive, but does not hold such wonder as the pyramids. If the statue was built in during the period of early A.C. then I wouldn't protest as much.
First Pluto, now the pyramids.
Funny that you should mention that, trademarkrain -- I remember seeing an article in an Egyptian newspaper stating that the new list was a conspiracy against Egypt.

I sort of laughed to myself, but, yeah -- I think the pyramids should be on the list, too. To me, it seemed like the list was just like, "Okay. We need new ones."

What's also of interest to me -- though I think it should be in the running, as it is -- is that Petra was voted for from Jordan by twice its population. Voting wasn't restricted, and could be done multiple times. But, this is the list that was released.
Team
It was actually pretty interesting putting this post together because I asked myself the same question. The pyramids are the only remaining Old World Wonder still standing today from when the magical 7 were first listed in 200 B.C.

What is also interesting about this new 7 Wonders campaign is that a lot of people aren't happy with it because it required having internet access to participate... so wired cities and people were able to sway what the choices were. There are also some people upset about the money that was spent in Brazil by some private individuals to publicize the campaign and to possibly get more votes for their local wonders.

With so many wondrous places in the world... how you can narrow it down to 7 anyway? I guess "The 215 Wonders of the World" just doesn't have the same ring to it...
Here's one that I made to commemorate the glory that is the California coast. Not human made, certainly, but human influenced. And for wonders, what can top Nature? After all, the artifact wonders of the world are partly what they are for their setting. Brasil's statue of Christ just wouldn't be as magnificent if it was in a plaza and framed by skyscrapers instead of the rich blue sky and screaming green of the hills. ;p My eight cents in the jar.

Pacific Coastline
"First Pluto, now the pyramids."
My thoughts exactly. :-/
Liberty Gift
http://www.malaysiasite.nl/images/Ron2.gif
Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur. The palette is based on my personal impression of high towers and the feeling of vertigo rather than on the actual buildings. But in some pictures they seem to capture the same tones.
Petronas

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