Lucky Numbers, Objects, and Colors

Lucky Numbers, Objects, and Colors


"Luck is probability taken personally," say most mathematicians, scientists and skeptics, but to some, luck is what gets them by and can be brought on by anything. If asked what their favourite or lucky number is, most people will choose between three, seven, and thirteen, and this is of interest because all of those are prime numbers, and anyone can tell you that prime numbers have one undeniable quality in common. They don't let anyone come between them and their man, number one.

All jokes aside, whole cultures have embraced luck, and sources of luck, in many different forms. The number three shows up in good things all over the place, from the Trinity to Pagan rituals and prayers. Seven has even surfaced commonly in lottery games, and a few of my friends think today will be lucky since it's the seventh day of the seventh month of the year two-thousand-seven. Thirteen is perceived as unlucky by the masses, but embraced by the outcasts as their saving grace. Generally characterised by better-than-good fortune, luck can seemingly be brought on by prayer, voodoo, hoodoo, sacrifices, or spells. Wishing someone luck before an event has become more of a motion than a statement, coming as a reaction, like 'thank you' or 'I'm sorry.' It can also be carried in objects.

But aren't there lucky colours?

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For the Record: Adobe Kuler vs COLOURlovers

For the Record: Adobe Kuler vs COLOURlovers


I get emails, instant messages and love notes pretty often asking if I've seen Adobe Kuler and if I'm upset about it... So here is my opinion on the matter.

Back in Nov. of last year Adobe Labs launched Kuler: A 5 color palette creation tool, built around rating, tagging, commenting and sharing the palettes. Craftzine gushed, "Not only can you create your own palettes, you can get inspired by the popular color combinations already uploaded by other users. Genius!"

I take the last word in that sentence with pride. The idea is genius... I should know, I created it 2 years earlier when I built COLOURlovers.

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Magnets Change Liquid’s Color

Magnets Change Liquid’s Color


The world is full of wonder. Jellyfish and other sea creatures can change colour at will or in reaction to stimuli. Chameleons blend into surroundings. Moths in Liverpool have evolved to disguise themselves to a spattering of pollutants on the sides of white buildings.

Magnets can change the colour of a liquid. At least that's what scientists have lately discovered with nanotechnology.

It's a Small World, After All

'Nanotechnology is full of surprises and new applications are discovered every day. One of the most unusual is the recent experiment of a team of scientists who were able to make a magnet change the color of a liquid, turning it from coffee-brown to orange, then green and finally dark blue. ... The liquid is actually a solution of iron oxide in water and this is the first time anyone has proven such a strange effect of magnetism.'

The iron-oxide solution could be employed in new displays, improving quality and colour range, and in rewritable electronic paper, which is already available.

To learn more, read the article at Softpedia.

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