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Daily Posts. Colorful Ideas & Inspirations.

Our team of writers brings you daily trend coverage, new products, inspiration, information and fun ideas. With an archive of more than 1,957 articles, you're sure to find something you love. Or if you have a great idea, let us know!

Color Inspiration: Paul Thurlby's Alphabet Series

Color Inspiration: Paul Thurlby's Alphabet Series


The alphabet series from Buckinghamshire based, freelance illustrator Paul Thurlby. Each letter has a nice vintage color palette. And for those who might be interested, Paul mentions on his blog that prints from the series will soon be available for purchase.


Paul_Thurlby:_A

Paul_Thurlby:_B
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The Colors of Film The Blanks

The Colors of Film The Blanks


What started as a doctor prescribed creative exercise to help John Taylor relax and get back into the swing of things after an extended stressful period of time in his life, Film the Blanks, "an ongoing experiment in deconstructing and abstracting film posters," has gathered much attention. Admittedly, and thankfully, John acknowledged that the outpouring of support - 10,000 visitors in the first month and request to feature his work in magazines and in galleries - as one of the reasons for his recovery; "I've had more fun and motivation and rewarding feedback in the last month working alone in my armchair than I have had in the last ten years designing for other people at a desk."

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Vintage Color & Design: Mid-20th c. Euro Poster Art

Vintage Color & Design: Mid-20th c. Euro Poster Art


Worthy enough for his own post (stay tuned), Bob Staake, the renowned American illustrator, cartoonist, children's book author, and designer, makes a point to showcase the work of those who inspire him. One way he is doing this is by sharing links and images on his site of those illustrators and designers that have shaped his own sense of composition, color and style. It's quite clear from his work that he has great taste, and those who continue to inspire Bob Staake, along with a great number of other contemporary illustrators and designers include: A.M. Cassandre, Alex Steinweiss, J.P. Miller, Paul Rand, Paolo Garretto, Jean Carlu, Donald Brun, Herbert Leupin, Albert Borer, Mary Blair, Aurelius Battaglia, Herve Morvan, & James Flora.

Throughout my life I've been mesmerized by posters -- particularly those created by the Europeans of the mid-20th Century. These bold, graphic and inventive posters continue to captivate contemporary illustrators, and while many of us have liberally taken inspiration from iconic poster graphics, I'd like to think we build on the visual tradition built by the artists (many well-known, many anonymous) who worked from 1930-1960 in France, Italy, Germany, Great Britain, and virtually every country on the European continent. - Bob Staake

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The Colors Of The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz

The Colors Of The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz


The classic story and illustrations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz are a testament to the talent and imagination of both L. Frank Baum and W.W. Denslow. Their use of color helped shape the tale of Dorothy, the Tin Woodmen, Scarecrow and Cowardly Lion along with all the other characters in the land of Oz.

The regions have a color schema: blue for Munchkins, yellow for Winkies, red for Quadlings, green for the Emerald city, and (in works after the first) purple for the Gillikins, which region was also not named in the first book.(This contrasts with Kansas; Baum, describing it, used "gray" nine times in four paragraphs.)

Map of OZ

In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, this is merely the favorite color, used for clothing and other man-made objects, and having some influence on their choice of crops, but the basic colors of the world are natural colors. The effect is less consistent in later works. In The Marvelous Land of Oz, the book states that everything in the land of the Gillikins is purple, including the plants and mud, and a character can see that he is leaving when the grass turns from purple to green, but it also describes pumpkins as orange and corn as green in that land. Baum, indeed, never used the color schema consistently; in many books, he alluded to the colors to orient the characters and readers to their location, and then did not refer to it again. His most common technique was to depict the man-made articles and flowers as the color of the country, leaving leaves, grass, and fruit their natural colors.

Colors of Oz

Colors_of_Oz Kansas_Cyclone

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Vintage Color & Design: Israeli Postage Stamps

Vintage Color & Design: Israeli Postage Stamps


I was pretty taken back by the color and designs in this incredible collection of postage stamps from Israel (there are a few from Romania too). Thanks to Karen Horton for sharing this wonderful collection.


Israel_0.12

Israel_25

Israel_40

posta_romana
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Color & Design: Beatles Album Covers

Color & Design: Beatles Album Covers


This is a guest post written by London Based designer Roger Chasteauneuf of Fred Design. You can read the original post here.

So we all know that album covers and record sleeves often present some of the most creative design and illustration around. Recently I was reading in Grafik. about the Keane Under the Iron Sea album design with illustrations by Sanna Annuka and found the whole process fascinating. So I decided to write a post on album cover design.

But here's where I hit a stumbling block. What to choose as a showcase. There is some marvelous design out there and I would point viewers to agencies like non-format who specialise in this. However, for the purpose of this article I will focus on The Beatles album covers. They have a fascinating variation which spans across a long and changing time period.

Revolver


There is little doubt that the Beatles were progressive with their music, and their album covers certainly mirrored this. Here on revolver we see a original mix of illustration and print by illustrator Klaus Voorman, himself a guitarist of some note.

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Vintage Color & Design: Valentine's Day Cards

Vintage Color & Design: Valentine's Day Cards


While it can be a little nauseating searching through all the cutesy, cuddly, blush-colored cards, I did find some, thankfully, with surprising palettes of unexpected colors. There are even a few that don't use red at all. Thanks goes to riptheskull for sharing their collection of 1,722 Valentine's Day cards.

The Valentine dates back to the 1400's where handmade version were first exchanged in parts of Europe. As early as the 1800's valentines began to be mass produced and have since been grossly commercialized, but i'm sure it was all for love.


valentine_kids

valentine_girl

to_my_valentine

to_one_i_love
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Vintage Color & Design: Czech Film Poster

Vintage Color & Design: Czech Film Poster


I came across this wonderful art film poster shop and gallery located in Prague called Terry Posters. The selection below is from their ongoing 'best of' Czech film posters series all of which, plus many, many more, are available for purchase on their website. Click on the image for the link.

The selection of the best Czech film posters ever selected by its curator Pavel Rajčan. This Best Of selection is updated on regular basis and is based on more than 7000 posters from Terry Posters´ collection.

Lucky Dragon No.5
Lucky_Dragon_No.5

A Jolly Bad Fellow
A_Jolly_Bad_Fellow

The Brothers Karamazov
Brothers_Karamazov

Alibi
Alibi
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Vintage Color & Design: No. 1 Comic Books

Vintage Color & Design: No. 1 Comic Books


Here's some color inspiration by way of cover art from the No. 1 issues of classic comic books. Thanks to j_philipp for sharing this collection.


DetectiveComics_No.1

Batman_No.1

Action_Comics_No.1

Captain_America_No.1
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Vintage Color & Design: Bolt Labels

Vintage Color & Design: Bolt Labels


Bolt labels, also called tickets, were stuck to the ends of bolts of cloth. The labels acted as a sort of trademark or brand, identifying a particular producer or merchant’s wares in the market place. Each label was designed specifically for the market it was sent to. The label was supposed to catch the eye of the shopper. You can read more about the history of the bolt label over at Bolton Museum. Thanks goes to flickr user Trevira for sharing this collection.


rich_merchant

double_value

rainbow_print_cloth

the_ricksha_boy
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