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Daily Posts. Colorful Ideas & Inspirations.

Our team of writers brings you daily trend coverage, new products, inspiration, information and fun ideas. With an archive of more than 2,089 articles, you're sure to find something you love. Or if you have a great idea, let us know!

Awesome tools for exploring color palettes


In the never-ending seek for inspiration, new ideas that will blow our minds away, we've stumbled across these interesting tools that could offer you various ways of bringing something fresh in your design work. Whether you lack innovation or just want to play around with colors, these handy tools will take you on a trip trough time, space and internet to give you what you want.

 

 

1. time travel by color

Is your current design project asking to be a little more retro? Needs some funk and crispy taste of the past of mankind? We present you a platform called Color Leap, unique gallery of chosen artwork from over 4000 years of our past.

How is this online tool useful for you? The website stores over 180 palettes of artworks from all around the world. For every time period, you can find a selection of paintings or designs, check their palettes and copy their hex-codes right into your project. For every moment in time, you can also see additional palettes which relate to this epoch.

Whether you are looking for a vintage, 60's style design, or diving all the way back in the ancient civilizations, this unique timeline can provide you with fresh ideas and suggest palettes you might have not considered before.

 

 

2. the grass is always greener

...or what code should I use to present nature this time? Tired of having to try out all kinds of RGB shades every single time you get a new project? What if there was a tool which can just select the most suitable color for the terms your design relates to...?

Turns out, there is. The description found on their website is "Google, but for colors". And they basically are. Picular is a tool which uses Google Search and the result of Picular search is a selection of the most used shades which relate to your searched term.

What this app does is selects the prominent colors from top 20 images which Google Search locates under the search term. So, next time you are feeling playful, try out some interesting abstract terms, let the avangard inspire you, discover the color of loneliness, jungle and confidence, based on images of people from all around the world.

We hope you liked our new suggestions, and that these tools can help you unlock creativity, get inspired and overcome the routine in your work flow.

Have you tried Color Leap or Picular yet? Share your impressions and experience in the comment section bellow.

 

Author: Nina Petrov

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How to price your work as a freelancer


We all start being freelancers thinking it's going to make our lives easier - we would put an end to underpaid work, we can manage our own time and best of all - do only the projects we love. If you are reading this, then you know that it's not all that perfect.

Sure, we get to choose the clients and learn something with every new project, but there is still a certain uncertainty when pricing our work, how do we do it right? There is a lot to consider, for sure. Of course that you wouldn't want to charge as much for the projects you really enjoyed and supported, for those you are doing for a friend and delivering work for a non-profit or charity.

Things to consider when pricing your work are the details of the project - what is required from you to do? Also, you would want to adapt the price to the scale of the company that is hiring you, as well as the number of revisions you will do.

First thing you need to do right is your project proposal. When writing your project proposal you want to make sure you are scheduling the deadline you can meet, offer all the details of what content you will provide and do not undercharge your work! For the amount of working hours, you need to charge adequately; otherwise you are risking a failure of the project you cannot dedicate to.

When pricing your work for a client, bear in mind that you are not offering just your time, but also all the experience and skills - a lifetime of learning and dedication to your clients needs. If a client suggests that you are too expensive, you need to be confident about the uniqueness of your offer - know what it is that will make the client happy, that you can offer and no one else on the market can? Why are you the obvious choice if someone wants to invest in their brand and the future of the company? Feel free to use all the work you ever did to prove your worth - content clients, good reviews, portfolio of chosen projects you are proud of and a clear vision of how will the work you do help this clients business for years to come.

Often, when you look for advice of how to price your work, you come across many equations of how other freelancers figured it out for themselves. In simple terms, though, this comes down on how to break even by doing what you do. This mind frame can help you choose projects according to your realistic needs, be paid well enough to live the lifestyle you want and invest in your future.

 

 

Make a clear calculation of your monthly expenses (rent, food, bills, etc), have a number of how much do you have to make per month in order to survive. Many freelancers rush into underpaid projects which take them too much time, without thinking of how they will cover their life expenses at the end of the month.

Second important number to this equation is the amount of hours you can/want to work per day. Decide for yourself what is the perfect amount of work every day - whether you will work four hours before and four after lunch; whether you will or will not work on weekends - make a clear schedule for your perfect daily balance.

I met designers who work best at night. Their whole wage was centered on how many nights a project will take them, and thus their lives adapted to their working mode. Everyone has their own rhythm, which is why 9 to 5 working hours are not your first choice. Best part of being a freelancer is being able to adapt your work style to your biorhythm.

 

 

When you have the numbers stating how much you spend per month and how many hours you will work per month, you can make a calculation of how much money you need to make per hour. Use this number as a referral, as a minimum of all minimums you should charge per hour. With this in mind, you need to take care of your monthly savings, think of things such as health insurance, retirement savings and other grown-up to-do's.

In addition to this number, you should be realistic oh how much you are worth and what is the optimum of how much you want to be paid in ideal circumstances. This will help you work for more expensive projects and save money for a holiday, renovating the apartment, joining the gym and other activities and joys which differentiate your life from surviving.

A friendly advice for your yearly budget is to consider how much you want to invest in improving your skills and better equipment for your work. Remember - the best job is the one where you get to learn every day and grow both on personal and professional level.

 

About the author:

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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Top 5 software to prototype amazing UI/UX


When communicating with clients, quality representation of our idea is very important. Client wants to see what your vision is, to have a clear picture of how it meets the demands of the market, and how it interacts with the users.

When choosing the right software to develop your prototype, you should consider which characteristics and features are essential to your work, which software can you easily adapt to and what fits your design process best.

A factor in choosing the right software is also your team, or better say if you are working within a team, as you would then require a software which you can share between yourselves. You would also need a program compatible with other design tools you already use, to avoid having to download loads of side programs for UI design.

Let's take a look at five best tools on the market in 2018:

 

Sketch

 

For those of you who are already used to Photoshop or Illustrator, Sketch is something you would easily adapt to. It is based on vectors, which ease the whole process of design, it is very intuitive and the simplicity of it helps you develop an interface super quickly.

One of its most popular features is nested symbols - the ability to add very simply pre-designed buttons, bubbles, widgets and even some more complex mechanisms. Great feature you can find useful is the ability to export your design into code, which enables easy implementation into, for example, web design.

 

 

Sketch is only available for Mac, comes with a free trial, and its full version can be purchased for $99.

 

InVision

 

A tool which integrates with Sketch, InVision is dominating the UI/UX market without any doubt. The greatest benefit coming from this amazing software is it's support to team work - within the program itself you can coordinate your project, manage tasks, follow the development and keep notes for the rest of your team.

 

 

This program is compatible with many other useful tools for project management, such as Trello, Slack and Dropbox. InVision will make your offer to the client way more impressive with the ability to offer guided tours, bringing them a presentation that will blow their minds away. Among companies which had their UI/UX prototypes developed using this tool are Twitter, LinkedIn and Uber, which gives us an excellent review of this software.

It is compatible for Mac and Windows users, it is free for one project, and price varies from $15 to $99 per month, depending on your needs.

 

Balsamiq

 

Balsamiq offers one of the easiest ways to create a mockup, dropping the elements on the board and moving them around. Everyone can master in using this amazing program. It is very useful for rough sketching of prototypes for fast delivery of your idea to the client.

 

 

It comes with a big library of elements (icons, images), enabling you to do a simple wireframe. This is not the program you would use to develop a complex prototype for an app, it is rather intended for static wireframes and for relatively new designers in the world of prototyping.

Available for Mac and Windows, comes with a 30-days free trial and the cost of the license is $89.

 

Origami

 

Developed by Facebook, this software offers you a possibility to easily design and test your idea. It allows you to import your designs from Photoshop and Sketch, where you can adapt them and make them animated and interactive.

Origami also enables you to export the elements of your prototype, send them to engineers and come step closer to your product. It is recommended when you are working with a contemporary interface and developing a modern and innovative idea.

By using an app Origami Live, you can explore your work directly on your devices in real time.

This program is also reserved for Mac users, while it is absolutely free to use.

 

Webflow

 

Webflow seems to have dominated the market as the most functional software for building the websites ever. The idea behind this incredible tool is for a designer to be able to construct a website without having to write the code.

Webflow operates similar to Photoshop, although it offers you the possibility to edit the code as well. It is great for web animation, interactive design and responsive web designs, and it also integrates Google Fonts. The final product of your work can be exported in HTML, CSS or JavaScript, but some might recommend getting the hosting with Webflow, as it is one of the fastest technologies on the market.

It is compatible with Windows and Mac, free for two projects, and from $16 to $35 per month for more projects.

 

 

If none of these top 5 programs work for you, some of our honorable mentions you can try are Framer, Adobe XD, Justinmind, Fluid UI, Axure, Principle, Atomic and Proto.io.

Explore these options for unlimited creativity in prototyping your design!

 

About the author:

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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How to shop for the dress which fits your body shape


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Being a woman has extraordinary benefits, although it often comes with an eternal dilemma of whether this is the right look for me, what colour make up matches my eyes, am I too fat for this dress and does my ass look big in this. In the world of design, we dedicate special attention to the shape of things, so why not make your own body a subject of interest and inspiration?

 

Fashion design is a well full of incredible insights about visual components of our lives, the world where clothing comes with its own philosophy. The key to save time on shopping and spend more time enjoying a spa treatment or working without pressure is to acknowledge and embrace all of your body curves.

 

Look at yourself in the mirror, explore the lines of your body and let the sexiness of it overwhelm you with confidence, creativity and inspiration. Discover more about your body type by asking yourself the following questions:

 

  1. Are my shoulders or bust broader than my overall body?

 

If so, then the suitable dress for you would be the one matching an inverted triangle body shape, where your upper body is broader than the lower part of the body.

 

The key for creating a balanced, hourglass body shape, is to wear an off-shoulder or v-neck dresses style, to draw attention to the hip section of the body.

 

Perfect choice for your would be A-line, Asymmetrical, Empire or carefully places details to the lower part of the dress, which helps the visual balance of your body curves.

 

  1. Are my hips or waistline broader than my bust?

 

If this is the case with you, then we are looking for a triangle or pear body shape styles, and dresses which fit this body type. To achieve the same hourglass figure, the attention should be brought from your hips to your upper busts area.

 

The suggested dress styles for you would be scoop neck, cold-shoulder or off-the-shoulder styles. It is also recommended that with these dresses you pick the neckline accessories, or that the dress had designed details on the upper part, to drag the attention up from your hips.

 

  1. Are my body curves distinctive, proportionately distributed?

 

If not, then your body doesn't have a clearly defined waistline, and your body type is either an oval apple or a straight banana body shape. The perfect dress you should wear creates the illusion of a defined waistline and achieves the hourglass effect.

 

Dresses you should pick are designed with belted or fitted waist, preferably A-line dress or Sheath dress.

 

Ready for your best online shopping experience ever?

 

Now that you know more about your body type, it's time to find that perfect dress! When shopping online, we have to pay special attention to the size chart. You should bare in mind that different brands and different stores have their own specific fitting size chart, which you should study carefully instead of shopping carelessly.

 

When shopping online, shop with a reputable online fashion boutique, such as Le Contour, place where you can find stunning dresses by emerging fashion designers. They offer a variety of clothing you can wear for both formal and non-formal occasions, dresses with a soul and of innovative designs.

 

Shop for the dresses you will love, the dresses that suit you, the dresses you will wear and not exhibit in your closet. Wear the dresses that describe you, highlight your personality, turn heads when you walk down the street.

 

Shop with Le Contour - fashion boutique with free worldwide delivery from Singapore. Discover more about them a reputable online fashion boutique, on Facebook or Instagram.

 

 

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Choose THIS Color of Website Button for Maximum Sales


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Can the colors that you use on your website actually help to make or break its success? It seems far-fetched, but there is research to support the claim.

 

Color and Perception

 

In fact, psychologists have spent years studying how color affects human perception. They theorize that certain colors may make you feel hungry, excited, sad, curious or happy. Now, experienced website builders are taking note of these findings and using them to their advantage.

 

Color Sets the Mood

 

The reality is that colors affect how people feel. The eyes perceive a color, and this is communicated to the hypothalamus in the brain. This communication results in a variety of signals being sent to the pituitary gland, through the endocrine system and straight to the glands in the thyroid. The thyroid, of course, is responsible for releasing hormones into the human body. Those hormones can be powerful, influencing mood and behavior.

 

Color Influences Buying Decisions

 

People who study color psychology estimate that when people assess a product, color is the number-one, overriding factor in their consideration. Many consumers make a split-second, albeit perhaps subconscious, decision regarding whether or not they are going to buy something based almost solely on the color.

 

Color Use Drives Website Conversion

 

Whether webmasters realize it or not, color psychology also is at work on their websites. The colors that they choose for the main elements on the pages and the buttons that visitors use to make purchases really do make a difference. Choose the right color, and your conversions may skyrocket. Go with the wrong color, and you may find yourself dealing with a dismal conversion rate.

 

Color and Distinctive Branding Go Together

 

Big organizations put a great deal of time, money and effort into branding. This includes the company name and a distinctive logo, but these aren't the only considerations. Of primary importance is the color in which the logo and brand name are presented.

 

 

Accordingly, it makes sense to put some serious thought into the colors that you use on your website. The backgrounds, borders, hero graphics, popups and buttons all need to present a coordinated color strategy. Even more important than coordination is choosing colors that will have website visitors clicking on the "buy" button.

 

Colors Need to Match the Business

 

When it comes to using colors on websites, it feels a bit like the stars have to be in alignment. The colors have to be right for your brand and be appealing to your target audience.

 

We can see a great example of this use of colors with most VPN services. The organization is fairly conservative, and so is its clientele. Splashy oranges, yellows and greens are probably not the way to go. Instead, tones of white, black, silver and navy blue are preferable. These colors are classic and pleasing to the eye. Moreover, they may be suggestive of trustworthiness and reliability, characteristics that most people would value when it comes to protecting their personal data from cyber criminals.

 

Alternatively, consider the case of a party planning business. Fun and vibrant events are their specialties. They do everything from birthday gatherings for six-year-olds to retirement parties for business executives. This may call for some brighter, more energizing colors. Red, yellow and orange wouldn't be out of place. Plus, you might see some pinks and purples, depending upon the event. Whatever specific colors are chosen, they should evoke feelings of fun and excitement.

 

Gender Matters

 

It also may be profitable to consider the gender of your typical customer. Research suggests that women gravitate toward blue, purple and green while they are repelled by orange, brown and gray. Men are different. Like women, they prefer blue and green, but black is a favorite too. Most of them dislike brown, orange and purple. The upshot is that if your business is primarily geared toward either women or men, then you should take these gender-based likes and dislikes into consideration when creating a color scheme for your website.

 

Colors for Call to Action Buttons

 

Many website gurus swear by using green on call to action buttons. Typically associated with all things natural and environmentally friendly, it seems that green also is an effective hue when it is used on website elements like "buy," "add to cart" and "submit" buttons. It is especially effective when it is the only green element on the page. Researchers say that this is because of something called the "isolation effect." When the conversion step on your website is the only green element, users can't help but be drawn to it.

 

Other colors also perform well when it comes to increasing conversions. Orange is a particular favorite of web designers as you can tell by this typical product recommendation layout. Note the recommended purchase choices are accompanied in each instance by a big orange button. Red and yellow convert well in this environment also.

 

Darker colors tend to exhibit low conversion rates. Either people don't see them or the dark colors are actually de-motivational. Overall, orange is not a favorite color of either men or women. Red can be the color of danger, and yellow is often used as a warning. If these colors are generally distasteful, why do they perform so well from a website conversion standpoint?

 

 

The answer may be that these oft-reviled colors can’t help but draw attention. Someone perusing a website can't keep their eyes from migrating toward those call to action buttons in colors like red, orange and yellow. This is why you may want to choose an overall color scheme for your website, but then use call to action buttons in contrasting colors like green, red, yellow or orange.

 

Final Thought

 

Of course, white space also can be a wonderful thing on a website. Don't neglect or banish this restful shade from your pages. It's what lets your visitors feel like they can relax and breathe while browsing. Plus, it will make the other colors that you choose pop off the page.

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7 Questions To Ask Yourself Before You Choose Your Final Design


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Whether you are creating a wedding stationery, a billboard ad, or a portfolio website, the one step that designers should almost always need to perfect is their choice of final design. After all, this is what clients pay you for and what will make your business more valuable in the eyes of your customers.

 

But before you can come up with the best final design for any kind of project, a certain level of introspection is required. As a lead designer of a project, you need to develop the necessary skills that will allow you to effectively choose a final design that matches the client’s brief.

 

And to help you with that, we have compiled the top 7 questions that any graphic artist should ask themselves before deciding on a final design. Read each question carefully and make sure to answer them as honestly as you can.

 

What is the design theme?

One of the first things to consider when creating any kind of project is its theme or motif.  At the beginning stage of the design creation process, following a theme will help direct creators on the right path for that specific design.

 

But this is not where the importance of a project’s design theme ends. As the lead designer, you still need to make sure that your final design sticks to the original theme you have decided with at the beginning.

 

To illustrate, if you are creating a billboard design for a mid-range activewear clothing brand, the final billboard design should adhere to the active lifestyle and market demographic that the brand caters. Of course, your clients will still have to approve a specific design or not. What is important is that you (as the lead designer) would have already narrowed down the design choices so that your clients will no longer feel overwhelmed on what final design to choose and use for their respective projects.

 

Is it too trendy?

Before choosing a final design, the next question to ask yourself is whether or not a design is too trendy. There can be a few instances where trendy designs can work out well for brands. But if having a project design that can be used for multiple instances throughout the years is your goal, you may have to evaluate if a certain design is trendy or not.

 

As with any kind of design project, designers are given a project brief or a description of what the client wants to have or achieve for a specific project. And most often, clients will prefer a design that will withstand the test of time and something that can be incorporated well into other marketing and informational corporate publications. As the lead designer, you need to determine and choose a final design that will match the client’s desires and, at the same time, not be too stylish that everyone else in the industry is doing it.

 

Can the design be easily understood?

Most graphic design projects are meant to entice and make another person think by just looking at it. This is the reason why most clients demand the creation of simple yet impactful design suggestions.

 

It is then your job as the graphic designer to translate the client’s objective into something that can be easily understood by the public. In short, you are the storyteller. And you need to choose a final design that will best tell the brand’s story to your audience.

 

For instance, if you are tasked with the creation of a company logo of a family-owned restaurant, you need to choose a final design that will imbibe the spirit of a family cooperation, easy meals, and fun times all in one tiny logo. Achieving the perfect logo design that perfectly fits the bill can be difficult. However, if you begin with the company’s storyits beginnings and how it continues to provide hearty meals for familiesyou will have a story to tell and you can begin developing design mockups that match that narrative.

 

To determine if your design can easily be understood or not before submitting it your client for review, you may take inspiration from real-world examples of projects found on graphic design inspiration blogs Behance, Dribbble, Template.net, Canva, and colourlovers.com.

 

Are all included graphic design elements licensed and legally obtained?

In most cases, graphic design projects will involve the use of different kinds of graphic design elements. From flat icons to logo designs to certain typeface families, designers will need to, one way or another, source these key design elements from different people or sites.

 

This is why, if you are now on the penultimate stage of the design process, you would most likely need to make sure that all the graphic design elements incorporated in any of your final designs are all sourced legally.

 

For instance, this means that you need to ask yourself and verify if a certain font style was bought and downloaded legally. As the lead designer, you also need to recheck if these design components can be used for commercial purposes. One main reason for asking yourself these questions is to make sure that you (and your client) will not be sued for intellectual copyright infringement in the future.

 

Ask yourself this question before you choose a final design and you will save yourself (and your client) any potential legal headache in the future. And even if you do not get sued in the future, the negative publicity associated with using someone else’s design or a derivative thereof without their written permission may break your own and your client’s credibility.

 

How does the design measure up against its competitors?

One of the main purposes of creating impactful design is for marketing. Brands and businesses frequently need to come up with a creative and enticing way to present their services and their products to any potential client in order to continue their market leads or to break into a specific market.

 

And using creative designs on various advertising and marketing materials is one way to get the attention of their targeted audience base. This is the reason why, as the design head, you need to ask yourself if a certain design can measure hold up well against its competitors in the same industry or not. Your answer to this question will greatly help you determine how a client will react to being presented with a specific design mock-up or suggestion.

 

By keeping this question at the forefront of your mind before you choose a final design, you will already have gauged how your design can be compared with and measure up against the designs of other services or products in the market. Clients will certainly appreciate it when you have already taken out the competition comparison task out of their hands and they will only be left with a design that can do wonders for their own businesses.

 

Is the design too expensive or difficult to reproduce?

As we have mentioned earlier, creative designs can be used in and incorporated into different end products and for various purposes. For example, a company letterhead design may be used in official company letters or memos while the design itself can be used as the official seal or logo design.

 

However, in some cases, some graphic design projects may call for complicated configurations or the use of non-traditional art mediums. To illustrate, if you are tasked with the creation of a luxury fashion house’ corporate branding designs and you opted to incorporate 3D elements as the design base, the entire project can be costly to reproduce and make it work for different design mediums due to its complexity. Of course, high-end fashion houses can certainly pay for this kind of project. But this may not be the case for other businesses.

 

This is one reason why graphic designers and artists need to ask themselves if any of their design suggestions is cost-effective or easy to reproduce or not. It is the job of the designer to create designs that will fit the client’s budget. You need to choose a final design that can be used on different presentation mediums without affecting the design end quality.

 

Does the design bring you joy?

This last question may not sound too pragmatic but it is a good way to assess whether or not a specific design is worthy of being the final design for any kind of creative project. Before you decide on what final design to use and/or present to your client for approval, you first need to ask yourself and your team (if applicable) if a certain design suggestion brings you joy or not.

 

It’s a simple yet important question. As the creator, you first need to be satisfied and be happy with a certain design yourself before you can wholeheartedly suggest its use to a client. It also matters that you are comfortable with how a final design will be used by your client. You need to ask yourself if a design brings you joy because it is only after honestly answering this question can you facilitate the use of your design to bring joy to other people’s lives.

 

Are You Now Ready to Choose Your Final Design?

 

Graphic design plays an important role in business and in daily life. As a graphic designer, just like any person who has a passion for creative arts, you need to carefully balance creating for yourself and for an audience. With the use of the seven questions that we have listed above, we hope that you can more accurately choose the best final designs for whatever project you may be working on.

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How to Create a Distinctive Trademark for Your Business


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A trademark represents the distinctive sign through which a business presents itself on any given market and this is why is very important to convey the message of the brand to its customers. It can be said that the trademark is the most relevant asset of a business, as it will distinguish the company’s products or services from the ones of the competition.

A sign becomes a trademark once the company that owns it registers it on the market in which it will operate; more exactly, when it is available for commercial use. In order to create a distinctive trademark, there are several tips that could help increasing the visibility of the brand.

 

One of the main aspects to consider when registering a trademark in any given jurisdiction, such as Japan, Italy or Ireland, is to create a logo that respects the requirements of the local legislation (for example, certain words can’t be registered – such as offensive words). At the same time, it is necessary to avoid descriptive words – represented by words that offer a description of the product or service, due to the fact that these words do not refer specifically to the company’s products/services, as they may also be used by competitors.

In Ireland, the legislation states that the local authorities can’t register trademarks that are identical or even similar with other trademarks that have already been registered in this country. At the same time, it is necessary to decide on the colors of the trademark, as the sign chosen will be registered only for the respective colors and the company will not be entitled to promote its products or services by using other colors than the ones already chosen.

In other countries, such as Estonia, certain types of trademarks can’t be protected under the local legislation if they lack a distinctive character; for example, if the logo is created only from letters that do not have a stylized form, it can’t be registered with the local authorities.

 

As a general rule, words that do not truly exist (invented words, a logo created from the association of two different words) in the vocabulary of a country tend to have the highest visibility rate, as they are new for the consumer market and they offer a competitive advantage through their novelty.   

Another way to increase the power of a trademark is by creating a catchy slogan to be associated with the company’s products. The combination of words and numbers can also represent a good idea for establishing a trademark and it advisable not to use three letter acronym logos, especially when the investors do not dispose of a large capital to be infused in marketing and advertising purposes.

In the situation in which the trademark is composed of several words, it is highly recommended to make the first word as memorable as possible – for example, by using foreign words, words describing animals, plants or fruits.  

 

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Innovations in design inspired by Tinder


One of the most famous dating app in the world, Tinder, has found a way to match over 20 million people per year. The app developers constructed and improved the design of this app to try and recreate the real-life experience on your mobile phone. Their aim was to make it as simple as possible, following user experience progress and implementing only the features users would love.

But in this article, it is not our topic to discuss Tinder; instead, we would like to take a look at what had Tinder inspired in the world of design and how has it contributed to playfulness and creativity of designers and other app developers.

Last week we shared with you some useful tools for typography online. One of the interesting apps that's left unmentioned is Font Flame - Tinder for font matching. By using this app, you are looking at different font combinations and you are using the swipe concept to generate which combinations you loved and which ones you will avoid using. It is still an early prototype, yet it solves one common problem for designers, and these "matches" between fonts are inspired by the Tinder app.

While talking about the swipe concept, let's see some ideas on Dribble from designers all over the world, and see what are their ideas inspired by this swiping for yes/no concept. In 2016, these ideas were extremely trending. For example, Berkay came up with an app that helps you choose the right product you want, based on your preferences :


https://bit.ly/2OCyu9X

 

Alex van Zijl brainstormed and shared his ideas about Movie Swiper, or how to use the swiping concept to choose the right movie for you

 


https://bit.ly/2Nua5Xy

 

Madalin also shared on Dribble an idea about how cool he thinks it would be to develop a Tinder for social events, such as Conferences. He added really nice design and used the networking concept of such social events to develop an actual web through which you are exploring your colleagues. He would also allow more details in the profile, as well as tags of interests to make the search more efficient.

 

https://bit.ly/2xBKUaW

 

The concept of Tinder, as well as speed dating, is often used as a warm-up on Congresses, Conferences, and Training all over the globe. Not to mention the Late Late Live Tinder and similar spin-offs this app has brought to the media.

We hope we inspired you to think about using an old style for a new idea, create a new original concept and kick-start your product. For the end, we would like to also mention nasserui and his new experiment on how he would change the style of Tinder (it also comes with some special effects every time you swipe left or right)

 

https://bit.ly/2NYDo3R

 

Some of these ideas might come really handy, don't you think?

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

 

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The Different Colors in Your Logo Design and What They Stand for


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Choosing a color scheme is one of the most important decisions in the logo design process. Not only do the right colors play an important role in a logo’s aesthetic appeal, they also communicate meaning. Below, we’ll take a look at what the various colors in a logo stand for in order to help you choose a color scheme that will communicate the right message about your brand. Here are the different colors in logo designs and what they mean.

Red

Red is a vibrant and energetic color that is associated with passion, excitement, and anger. It’s a powerful color that can elicit strong emotions in the people who view it. If you want an exuberant and edgy logo that creates a strong emotional response then red is a good color to include.

Orange

Like red, orange is an energetic and vibrant color. However, it isn’t quite as mature and serious and is a little more playful and casual than red. Children often prefer the color orange, making it a good choice for children’s products. Orange is also an appetizing color, making it a popular choice for food and beverage companies as well.

Green

As the color most associated with the natural world, green is a calming color that conveys the idea that your brand is natural and eco-friendly. Since green is the color of cash, it’s also associated with wealth and is thus often used in logos for financial institutions.

Blue

Blue is the most common color in logo design, and over half of all logos incorporate some shade of blue into their color scheme. Blue is the color of intelligence, trustworthiness, and maturity. It’s often associated with technology and is therefore an especially popular choice for tech company logos. However, blue can be successfully used in just about any logo design.

White

White is the color of cleanliness and purity, which makes it a popular choice for pharmaceutical companies, cleaning supply companies, and many more. In most cases, though, white is better used as an accent color rather than the primary color in your logo since too much white will be seen as sterile and bland. This is especially true since most logos displayed online will be displayed against a white background.

Brown

Brown is an earthy and masculine color. Like green, brown is associated with nature as well, though it is most often more associated with the rough and rugged side of nature than the calming and peaceful side. If you are selling equipment, sporting goods, or other products geared towards outdoorsy customers then brown is a good color to include in your logo.

Black

Black is a modern, powerful, and luxurious color. It’s also a very formal color, though, so if you are going for a fun, casual brand image then black is best avoided. If prestige, luxury, and class are the connotations that you’re aiming for, though, then black is an excellent color to incorporate into your logo design.

Pink

The color of femininity, pink is a fun, playful, and lighthearted color that is a good choice if your brand is targeted almost entirely toward female customers. However, the color pink will repel many male customers, so it’s not a great choice if you are attempting to sell your products or services to both sexes.

Yellow

Yellow is one the brightest and most cheerful of all the colors. It is often associated with childhood and therefore is often used to promote children’s products and brands. If you use yellow in your logo, be sure to stick with the brighter shades as dull or brownish yellow is associated with sickness.

Grey

Grey is a neutral middle ground between white and black. It’s a serious and mature color that is often associated with industry and manufacturing. Grey by itself can also be a very unexciting color, though, so unless neutral and unexciting is what you’re going for it’s better to include other colors in your logo as well.

Purple

Purple has long been seen as the color of royalty, dating back to the times when purple dye was the most expensive of all dyes. Today, purple is still associated with royalty and luxury. It’s a slightly feminine color, but certainly not so much that it excludes male customers in the same way that pink is prone to.

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The Ws And Hs Of Color In Logo Design


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The Ws And Hs Of Color In Logo Design

 

We can’t help but admire the beauty and excellence of a well-designed logo. It’s true. Step out into the market and search for a product. You’re probably going to end up choosing the one that has a nice logo, the one that describes what you feel, and understands what you want.

A logo design is a part of the brand building process, which either adds to the business success or downgrades it. It comprises several components, each of which highlight the prospects the business is able to reach via an identity. Though each logo design element may reserve its importance, what the color does for the logo design is what the logo design does for the business.

We humans are visual beings and depend on colors to guide the course of our life. When it comes to brands and businesses, colors impart a distinct visual identity to them, without losing their respective aura.

Want to learn why and how the colors work their way through a logo design? Consider this article your North Star because it’s going to elaborate on every questionable W and H regarding colors in logo design and shed light on the deep details that are easily missed out.

The article will first walk you through the whys and whats, after which we’ll be dealing with the hows of the logo design color scenario.

So, let’s begin.

The Ws

 

W # 1: What Does The Color Psychology Say About Colors In Logos?

 

Almost everyone knows that there is some psychology behind colors but not everyone knows that there is a latticework of numerous emotions and behaviors guided by the colors alone. Each color is limitless in its expression and can elicit responses varying from person to person. For instance, red is known for its passionate qualities, but the same red (when representing blood) can nauseate many.

Moreover, picking colors for your business’s logo isn’t as easy as a nursery rhyme. Our mind is a highly specialized machine that makes intricate color combinations with various factors, such as culture, context, and various instructions and shapes our perception with respect to our surroundings. Moreover, we tend to associate different feelings and emotions with colors over time.

Anyhow, color psychology today is neglected to a greater extent and is generalized to simplistic concepts. For instance, red is passionate, green is soothing, and blue is calming etc.

When we use colors in a logo, we need to be aware of how the human mind works with colors and the respective context. We must bear in mind what makes a logo a good logo and how color psychology comes into play when cementing a solid foundation for your business’s logo design. Let’s take a brief look at what messages color convey with their meanings.

 

  • Red: Ever wonder why the ‘DO NOT TOUCH’ button is always red? Because it triggers abrupt responses as well as feelings of excitement, passion, hunger, loudness, and anger. It also represents youth, modernity, and playfulness.
  • Orange: Like the fruit itself, it is an energetic color and gives off a springy vibe. It is also known as the color for invigoration and sets one apart from the crowd. The reason for its energy is the powerful blend of red and yellow – both the primary colors.
  • Yellow: Think sun, think yellow. It contains all the optimism, positivity, and the warmth that invites creative and imaginative thinking. It also is used as an indicator of prompt action without any edgy or aggressive intension.
  • Green: What do a farmer and a marketer have in common? They both think green. Green is a versatile color option that packs a fresh, nature punch. Though being a secondary color, it combines the soothing and positive properties of the parent colors.
  • Blue: Blue belongs to the cold color category for a reason. The water, the clear skies, and the glaciers – they all resonate that soothing, calming, and composing feeling. Brands use blue to assure trust and liability along with spirituality and divinity.
  • Purple: Purple was used primarily to symbolize royalty, power, mysticism, and magic. In today’s era, it is used to convey wisdom, courage, confidence, and creativity.
  • Pink: From the beginning of the modern world, pink has remained its distinct gender-based identity, but the shades and tints say a lot more than that. From rusty shades to youthful rose gold tints, it’s got it all.
  • Brown: A serious earthy tone that defines masculinity and rigidity. It isn’t considered much as a part of the modern color culture, but using it the right way can make you stand apart from the crowd.
  • Black: The slick, the modern, the forever young – black never leaves the limelight. It also exhibits modernity and luxuriousness.
  • White: The extreme opposite of black and quite economical, the absence of color makes you look more neutral and can work for anything.
  • Gray: It’s the middle road between black and white and combines the properties of both to indicate a mature, classy, and serious tone.

W # 2: What Impact Do The Colors Have With Their Meanings?

 

As we discussed earlier, colors can deviate from the semantics they’re known for. Why do we associate an attribute or emotion with one color? Do colors mean what they mean or do we give them our own meanings?

Since the brain is a 24/7 running machine, it contains several nodes dedicated to each color. Yes. Every. Single. Color. No matter how many colors you’re exposed to, your brain has the ability to modify those nodes. It’s Iike a color sequence where you keep adding attributes to each color based on your growing exposure and experience with that color.

For instance, a red car on the road may remind you of the pain you experienced when you were hit by a red car in your childhood. It probably isn’t the same car, but the stimulus is the color red that triggers the memory of pain you once associated with it.

You could see it from a different perspective as well. When you’d see red around food, you’d probably remember your favorite fast food brand. Seeing a red logo triggers hunger, so there’s another experience.

W # 3: What Differentiates The Colors From One Another?

 

Color psychology revolves around everything related to color. It isn’t just a ‘blue is calm, yellow is happy, and red is passion’ thing; it’s much more than that. Apart from the main themes, the colors are associated with, the experience, culture, context, and background play a crucial role in setting the overall tone for the color perception.

Your past experience complied with the cultural usage of color and the context determine the overall meaning of a color. Despite those facts, many brands might exceed beyond the generally accepted notion of color perception and set a different color standard suited to the business values and objectives.

W # 4: Why Are We Affected By Colors?

 

You must’ve learned by now that the color perception keeps getting regulated time by time. So, why does that color perception affect us? How do the colors get ingrained into our minds and what impact do they have on our actions?

The color control runs in the subconscious of your mind, like a background app in your smartphone. When you come across a color, your mind produces two kinds of reactions: Arousal and evaluation.

The best case of arousal reaction can be explained easily with red when linked to romantic interests. A cascade of biological reactions inside the body takes place and as a consequence, we experience an adrenalin rush and an increased heart rate. The higher the arousal, the higher are the chances of getting hurt.

However, the other reaction is linked to the evaluation or likeness pattern of color choice. People are attracted to colors that are bright and warm in nature. For instance, if you’re hungry and are going to choose between two food brands – one using red and the other using multiple colors – your color node associated with hunger becomes activated and overrides your senses and lets you choose the one that has a stronger connection and perspective integrated within the internode connection in your brain.

Both these activation processes are at work in the subconscious of every individual exposed to colors. This part of psychology works well when brands are deciding colors of their logos.

W # 5: Why Do Color Combinations Matter For A Logo?

 

They say that a color can stir some emotions in your memory. But there’s another thing to it. Colors are more than what they seem and in the case of brands, a specific goal can be achieved using appropriate colors. As we’ve mentioned before, your subconscious is in a constant process of running the color code and acting as an action incentive section; the colors in logos work in the same manner.

But it is important to render the key traits of your business as well as the perception of your customers. Colors, with all their relevance, are used to define your brand personality. However, they should address your brand characteristics. Before you jump at the color scheme, ask yourself these questions:

  • What are the key traits of my brand?
  • Which colors best represent those traits?
  • Which actions can those traits and colors provoke in the customers’ minds?
  • Are the brand characteristics appropriate to my audience?
  • Are my traits and color palette aligned with my target audience’s perceptions?

Once you’ve figured out how’s everything keeps getting linked, you will likely pinpoint the right color scheme for your logo design.

The Hs

We’ve got past the color psychology and how the whole color psychology works. Now, let’s narrow our path to discovering how colors contribute in defining a logo and how your brand value gets a distinguished presence – just by color alone.

H # 1: How To Choose The Perfect Color Scheme For Your Logo?

 

Depending on the type of your business, there are several ways via which you can choose the color scheme. Just know that it is not a random color choice, but a deeply ingrained one. Each color has its own hue, value, and saturation. You must see past the visual representation and think about the how your color scheme is going to connect your customers with your product.

The process starts by going through the color wheel which has variations of primary and secondary colors. For your convenience, divide the color wheel into two halves. One half contains warm colors, while the other contains cool colors. The arrangement of colors in the color wheel gives you the idea of appropriateness and a balanced color scheme.

Based on your business’s objective, you can make the following combinations.

  • Monochromatic: As the term indicates, different values of the same hues are combined to give a more balanced feel. They have the same temperature and are able to grab the attention in a smooth way.

 

  • Analogous: Analogous color schemes are made using adjacent colors, such as red and orange and blue and green. To make one of the hues pop out, you can adjust the values of these colors.

 

  • Triadic: Tri means three and this type of color scheme uses three colors placed at equal intervals from each other. For instance, you can use red, yellow, and blue or green, orange, and purple. This type of combination has high saturation and intensity since they balance the temperature as well as the contrast.

 

  • Complementary: The colors in this scheme type are located opposite each other, such as blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and purple. These have high intensity and a high visual effect. What makes this combination the most used is the versatility that it adds to your logo design and works well with dominant colors and the evenly distributed ones.

 

  • Split Complementary: This combination contains three colors: a complementary combination with an adjacent color on either side. For instance, if you’re pairing green with red, you’ll be using green with red and red-orange.

As fun as it sounds, creating a color scheme for yoeur logo requires skills, knowledge, and time. A good color scheme controls the saturation and contrast in your logo design. You can create unique combinations by using neutrals and the classic B&W.

When deciding between colors, make sure you’re choosing the not-too-vibrant or not-too-subtle combination. When in doubt, check out what color schemes your successful competitors are using. Combine some inspiration, knowledge, and your imagination to devise the perfect scheme.

 

H # 2: How Many Colors Can You Choose?

 

Now that you’ve learned what each color means and the ways of combining them, how can you determine the number of colors you can choose for your logo design? Of course, the choices are unlimited, but since there is a semantic meaning behind each color, the number of colors have a meaning to them too.

The number of colors depends on your product. Is it something with a utility purpose or does it correspond to luxury? If it’s a causal product that displays lightheartedness and playfulness, you can choose more colors. On the other hand, if your product has a serious nature and is targeted at a particular audience, then the fewer colors, the better it is.

Another thing that determines the number of colors is the amount of content you use in your logo. If your logo is laden with several design elements and redundant text, the colors will lose their power. But if there is too little content and too much color, it’s still going to pose a problem for you. Your design will also become overwhelming if you’re putting in too much content as well as colors in your logo.

However, the key here is to choose the colors that represent the major attributes of your business and set its tone.

 

H # 3: How To Associate Your Brand Value With Your Logo Color?

 

As discussed above, the colors must align with your business objectives. They should bring out those elements and maintain a sense of congruency with the product. For instance, choosing deeper hues of black and purple when used in logos of a luxury brand will improve brand association with its products and motives.

In addition, marketers experiment with different approaches as to how colors can communicate several messages by activating the color nodes. They bring psychology to play with multiple factors, such as evolution, environment, gender, and social norms etc.

Pay attention to what your audience thinks about the colors in your logo and what evokes them to take the action. Noting the minute but deep details can help you associate your brand values with the colors in your logo.

 

H # 3: How Can You Get A Professional Logo?

 

If you’re a designer, then the above concepts might come easily to you. As for the brands in other domains, they either try their luck or hire experts to deliver a fully-furnished logo for their business. However, for brands that cannot afford expensive logo design, DesignMantic offers the ultimate solution; it offers a complete range of logo designs that help you pinpoint your brand’s goals.

Designing with DesignMantic doesn’t require you to acquire prior experience or knowledge of logo design as it allows you to choose your desired logo design from a plethora of options and have it customized. What’s more, you can even create your own logo using DesignMantic’s AI-driven logo maker tool.

With an advanced tool like that, you can achieve a hassle-free professional logo design in no time.

Bottom Line

 

Now that everything’s said and done, the colors will never cease to rein our world. With all that you’ve learned about how the color system hardwired into our minds, the color psychology is best at play when exhibiting the brand messages.

Colors are one of the main communication sources that drive our senses. They make us feel whatever we’re oriented towards, which makes the underlying psychology a form of an interesting art. We learn to deliver messages without using verbal cues and that is also how the successful brands employ special color codes to drive their audience. At the end, it is hoped that this article has covered most of the Ws and Hs of the color in logo design and has contributed to your knowledge.

Author Bio:

 

Meet Evan! He’s a Digital Marketing pro who’s been proactively engaged with the cyberspace since 2008, focusing on design services, user interface planning, and branding with a never-ending list. He now leads content marketing efforts at DesignMantic. Plus, Evan’s also a design aficionado since he loves DIY design projects.

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