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The Different Colors in Your Logo Design and What They Stand for


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Choosing a color scheme is one of the most important decisions in the logo design process. Not only do the right colors play an important role in a logo’s aesthetic appeal, they also communicate meaning. Below, we’ll take a look at what the various colors in a logo stand for in order to help you choose a color scheme that will communicate the right message about your brand. Here are the different colors in logo designs and what they mean.

Red

Red is a vibrant and energetic color that is associated with passion, excitement, and anger. It’s a powerful color that can elicit strong emotions in the people who view it. If you want an exuberant and edgy logo that creates a strong emotional response then red is a good color to include.

Orange

Like red, orange is an energetic and vibrant color. However, it isn’t quite as mature and serious and is a little more playful and casual than red. Children often prefer the color orange, making it a good choice for children’s products. Orange is also an appetizing color, making it a popular choice for food and beverage companies as well.

Green

As the color most associated with the natural world, green is a calming color that conveys the idea that your brand is natural and eco-friendly. Since green is the color of cash, it’s also associated with wealth and is thus often used in logos for financial institutions.

Blue

Blue is the most common color in logo design, and over half of all logos incorporate some shade of blue into their color scheme. Blue is the color of intelligence, trustworthiness, and maturity. It’s often associated with technology and is therefore an especially popular choice for tech company logos. However, blue can be successfully used in just about any logo design.

White

White is the color of cleanliness and purity, which makes it a popular choice for pharmaceutical companies, cleaning supply companies, and many more. In most cases, though, white is better used as an accent color rather than the primary color in your logo since too much white will be seen as sterile and bland. This is especially true since most logos displayed online will be displayed against a white background.

Brown

Brown is an earthy and masculine color. Like green, brown is associated with nature as well, though it is most often more associated with the rough and rugged side of nature than the calming and peaceful side. If you are selling equipment, sporting goods, or other products geared towards outdoorsy customers then brown is a good color to include in your logo.

Black

Black is a modern, powerful, and luxurious color. It’s also a very formal color, though, so if you are going for a fun, casual brand image then black is best avoided. If prestige, luxury, and class are the connotations that you’re aiming for, though, then black is an excellent color to incorporate into your logo design.

Pink

The color of femininity, pink is a fun, playful, and lighthearted color that is a good choice if your brand is targeted almost entirely toward female customers. However, the color pink will repel many male customers, so it’s not a great choice if you are attempting to sell your products or services to both sexes.

Yellow

Yellow is one the brightest and most cheerful of all the colors. It is often associated with childhood and therefore is often used to promote children’s products and brands. If you use yellow in your logo, be sure to stick with the brighter shades as dull or brownish yellow is associated with sickness.

Grey

Grey is a neutral middle ground between white and black. It’s a serious and mature color that is often associated with industry and manufacturing. Grey by itself can also be a very unexciting color, though, so unless neutral and unexciting is what you’re going for it’s better to include other colors in your logo as well.

Purple

Purple has long been seen as the color of royalty, dating back to the times when purple dye was the most expensive of all dyes. Today, purple is still associated with royalty and luxury. It’s a slightly feminine color, but certainly not so much that it excludes male customers in the same way that pink is prone to.

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The Ws And Hs Of Color In Logo Design


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The Ws And Hs Of Color In Logo Design

 

We can’t help but admire the beauty and excellence of a well-designed logo. It’s true. Step out into the market and search for a product. You’re probably going to end up choosing the one that has a nice logo, the one that describes what you feel, and understands what you want.

A logo design is a part of the brand building process, which either adds to the business success or downgrades it. It comprises several components, each of which highlight the prospects the business is able to reach via an identity. Though each logo design element may reserve its importance, what the color does for the logo design is what the logo design does for the business.

We humans are visual beings and depend on colors to guide the course of our life. When it comes to brands and businesses, colors impart a distinct visual identity to them, without losing their respective aura.

Want to learn why and how the colors work their way through a logo design? Consider this article your North Star because it’s going to elaborate on every questionable W and H regarding colors in logo design and shed light on the deep details that are easily missed out.

The article will first walk you through the whys and whats, after which we’ll be dealing with the hows of the logo design color scenario.

So, let’s begin.

The Ws

 

W # 1: What Does The Color Psychology Say About Colors In Logos?

 

Almost everyone knows that there is some psychology behind colors but not everyone knows that there is a latticework of numerous emotions and behaviors guided by the colors alone. Each color is limitless in its expression and can elicit responses varying from person to person. For instance, red is known for its passionate qualities, but the same red (when representing blood) can nauseate many.

Moreover, picking colors for your business’s logo isn’t as easy as a nursery rhyme. Our mind is a highly specialized machine that makes intricate color combinations with various factors, such as culture, context, and various instructions and shapes our perception with respect to our surroundings. Moreover, we tend to associate different feelings and emotions with colors over time.

Anyhow, color psychology today is neglected to a greater extent and is generalized to simplistic concepts. For instance, red is passionate, green is soothing, and blue is calming etc.

When we use colors in a logo, we need to be aware of how the human mind works with colors and the respective context. We must bear in mind what makes a logo a good logo and how color psychology comes into play when cementing a solid foundation for your business’s logo design. Let’s take a brief look at what messages color convey with their meanings.

 

  • Red: Ever wonder why the ‘DO NOT TOUCH’ button is always red? Because it triggers abrupt responses as well as feelings of excitement, passion, hunger, loudness, and anger. It also represents youth, modernity, and playfulness.
  • Orange: Like the fruit itself, it is an energetic color and gives off a springy vibe. It is also known as the color for invigoration and sets one apart from the crowd. The reason for its energy is the powerful blend of red and yellow – both the primary colors.
  • Yellow: Think sun, think yellow. It contains all the optimism, positivity, and the warmth that invites creative and imaginative thinking. It also is used as an indicator of prompt action without any edgy or aggressive intension.
  • Green: What do a farmer and a marketer have in common? They both think green. Green is a versatile color option that packs a fresh, nature punch. Though being a secondary color, it combines the soothing and positive properties of the parent colors.
  • Blue: Blue belongs to the cold color category for a reason. The water, the clear skies, and the glaciers – they all resonate that soothing, calming, and composing feeling. Brands use blue to assure trust and liability along with spirituality and divinity.
  • Purple: Purple was used primarily to symbolize royalty, power, mysticism, and magic. In today’s era, it is used to convey wisdom, courage, confidence, and creativity.
  • Pink: From the beginning of the modern world, pink has remained its distinct gender-based identity, but the shades and tints say a lot more than that. From rusty shades to youthful rose gold tints, it’s got it all.
  • Brown: A serious earthy tone that defines masculinity and rigidity. It isn’t considered much as a part of the modern color culture, but using it the right way can make you stand apart from the crowd.
  • Black: The slick, the modern, the forever young – black never leaves the limelight. It also exhibits modernity and luxuriousness.
  • White: The extreme opposite of black and quite economical, the absence of color makes you look more neutral and can work for anything.
  • Gray: It’s the middle road between black and white and combines the properties of both to indicate a mature, classy, and serious tone.

W # 2: What Impact Do The Colors Have With Their Meanings?

 

As we discussed earlier, colors can deviate from the semantics they’re known for. Why do we associate an attribute or emotion with one color? Do colors mean what they mean or do we give them our own meanings?

Since the brain is a 24/7 running machine, it contains several nodes dedicated to each color. Yes. Every. Single. Color. No matter how many colors you’re exposed to, your brain has the ability to modify those nodes. It’s Iike a color sequence where you keep adding attributes to each color based on your growing exposure and experience with that color.

For instance, a red car on the road may remind you of the pain you experienced when you were hit by a red car in your childhood. It probably isn’t the same car, but the stimulus is the color red that triggers the memory of pain you once associated with it.

You could see it from a different perspective as well. When you’d see red around food, you’d probably remember your favorite fast food brand. Seeing a red logo triggers hunger, so there’s another experience.

W # 3: What Differentiates The Colors From One Another?

 

Color psychology revolves around everything related to color. It isn’t just a ‘blue is calm, yellow is happy, and red is passion’ thing; it’s much more than that. Apart from the main themes, the colors are associated with, the experience, culture, context, and background play a crucial role in setting the overall tone for the color perception.

Your past experience complied with the cultural usage of color and the context determine the overall meaning of a color. Despite those facts, many brands might exceed beyond the generally accepted notion of color perception and set a different color standard suited to the business values and objectives.

W # 4: Why Are We Affected By Colors?

 

You must’ve learned by now that the color perception keeps getting regulated time by time. So, why does that color perception affect us? How do the colors get ingrained into our minds and what impact do they have on our actions?

The color control runs in the subconscious of your mind, like a background app in your smartphone. When you come across a color, your mind produces two kinds of reactions: Arousal and evaluation.

The best case of arousal reaction can be explained easily with red when linked to romantic interests. A cascade of biological reactions inside the body takes place and as a consequence, we experience an adrenalin rush and an increased heart rate. The higher the arousal, the higher are the chances of getting hurt.

However, the other reaction is linked to the evaluation or likeness pattern of color choice. People are attracted to colors that are bright and warm in nature. For instance, if you’re hungry and are going to choose between two food brands – one using red and the other using multiple colors – your color node associated with hunger becomes activated and overrides your senses and lets you choose the one that has a stronger connection and perspective integrated within the internode connection in your brain.

Both these activation processes are at work in the subconscious of every individual exposed to colors. This part of psychology works well when brands are deciding colors of their logos.

W # 5: Why Do Color Combinations Matter For A Logo?

 

They say that a color can stir some emotions in your memory. But there’s another thing to it. Colors are more than what they seem and in the case of brands, a specific goal can be achieved using appropriate colors. As we’ve mentioned before, your subconscious is in a constant process of running the color code and acting as an action incentive section; the colors in logos work in the same manner.

But it is important to render the key traits of your business as well as the perception of your customers. Colors, with all their relevance, are used to define your brand personality. However, they should address your brand characteristics. Before you jump at the color scheme, ask yourself these questions:

  • What are the key traits of my brand?
  • Which colors best represent those traits?
  • Which actions can those traits and colors provoke in the customers’ minds?
  • Are the brand characteristics appropriate to my audience?
  • Are my traits and color palette aligned with my target audience’s perceptions?

Once you’ve figured out how’s everything keeps getting linked, you will likely pinpoint the right color scheme for your logo design.

The Hs

We’ve got past the color psychology and how the whole color psychology works. Now, let’s narrow our path to discovering how colors contribute in defining a logo and how your brand value gets a distinguished presence – just by color alone.

H # 1: How To Choose The Perfect Color Scheme For Your Logo?

 

Depending on the type of your business, there are several ways via which you can choose the color scheme. Just know that it is not a random color choice, but a deeply ingrained one. Each color has its own hue, value, and saturation. You must see past the visual representation and think about the how your color scheme is going to connect your customers with your product.

The process starts by going through the color wheel which has variations of primary and secondary colors. For your convenience, divide the color wheel into two halves. One half contains warm colors, while the other contains cool colors. The arrangement of colors in the color wheel gives you the idea of appropriateness and a balanced color scheme.

Based on your business’s objective, you can make the following combinations.

  • Monochromatic: As the term indicates, different values of the same hues are combined to give a more balanced feel. They have the same temperature and are able to grab the attention in a smooth way.

 

  • Analogous: Analogous color schemes are made using adjacent colors, such as red and orange and blue and green. To make one of the hues pop out, you can adjust the values of these colors.

 

  • Triadic: Tri means three and this type of color scheme uses three colors placed at equal intervals from each other. For instance, you can use red, yellow, and blue or green, orange, and purple. This type of combination has high saturation and intensity since they balance the temperature as well as the contrast.

 

  • Complementary: The colors in this scheme type are located opposite each other, such as blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and purple. These have high intensity and a high visual effect. What makes this combination the most used is the versatility that it adds to your logo design and works well with dominant colors and the evenly distributed ones.

 

  • Split Complementary: This combination contains three colors: a complementary combination with an adjacent color on either side. For instance, if you’re pairing green with red, you’ll be using green with red and red-orange.

As fun as it sounds, creating a color scheme for yoeur logo requires skills, knowledge, and time. A good color scheme controls the saturation and contrast in your logo design. You can create unique combinations by using neutrals and the classic B&W.

When deciding between colors, make sure you’re choosing the not-too-vibrant or not-too-subtle combination. When in doubt, check out what color schemes your successful competitors are using. Combine some inspiration, knowledge, and your imagination to devise the perfect scheme.

 

H # 2: How Many Colors Can You Choose?

 

Now that you’ve learned what each color means and the ways of combining them, how can you determine the number of colors you can choose for your logo design? Of course, the choices are unlimited, but since there is a semantic meaning behind each color, the number of colors have a meaning to them too.

The number of colors depends on your product. Is it something with a utility purpose or does it correspond to luxury? If it’s a causal product that displays lightheartedness and playfulness, you can choose more colors. On the other hand, if your product has a serious nature and is targeted at a particular audience, then the fewer colors, the better it is.

Another thing that determines the number of colors is the amount of content you use in your logo. If your logo is laden with several design elements and redundant text, the colors will lose their power. But if there is too little content and too much color, it’s still going to pose a problem for you. Your design will also become overwhelming if you’re putting in too much content as well as colors in your logo.

However, the key here is to choose the colors that represent the major attributes of your business and set its tone.

 

H # 3: How To Associate Your Brand Value With Your Logo Color?

 

As discussed above, the colors must align with your business objectives. They should bring out those elements and maintain a sense of congruency with the product. For instance, choosing deeper hues of black and purple when used in logos of a luxury brand will improve brand association with its products and motives.

In addition, marketers experiment with different approaches as to how colors can communicate several messages by activating the color nodes. They bring psychology to play with multiple factors, such as evolution, environment, gender, and social norms etc.

Pay attention to what your audience thinks about the colors in your logo and what evokes them to take the action. Noting the minute but deep details can help you associate your brand values with the colors in your logo.

 

H # 3: How Can You Get A Professional Logo?

 

If you’re a designer, then the above concepts might come easily to you. As for the brands in other domains, they either try their luck or hire experts to deliver a fully-furnished logo for their business. However, for brands that cannot afford expensive logo design, DesignMantic offers the ultimate solution; it offers a complete range of logo designs that help you pinpoint your brand’s goals.

Designing with DesignMantic doesn’t require you to acquire prior experience or knowledge of logo design as it allows you to choose your desired logo design from a plethora of options and have it customized. What’s more, you can even create your own logo using DesignMantic’s AI-driven logo maker tool.

With an advanced tool like that, you can achieve a hassle-free professional logo design in no time.

Bottom Line

 

Now that everything’s said and done, the colors will never cease to rein our world. With all that you’ve learned about how the color system hardwired into our minds, the color psychology is best at play when exhibiting the brand messages.

Colors are one of the main communication sources that drive our senses. They make us feel whatever we’re oriented towards, which makes the underlying psychology a form of an interesting art. We learn to deliver messages without using verbal cues and that is also how the successful brands employ special color codes to drive their audience. At the end, it is hoped that this article has covered most of the Ws and Hs of the color in logo design and has contributed to your knowledge.

Author Bio:

 

Meet Evan! He’s a Digital Marketing pro who’s been proactively engaged with the cyberspace since 2008, focusing on design services, user interface planning, and branding with a never-ending list. He now leads content marketing efforts at DesignMantic. Plus, Evan’s also a design aficionado since he loves DIY design projects.

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How to choose the colors for your company logo


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Do you know how to choose the colors for your company logo? Creativity is key during this process and so is the manner in which the clients will perceive the color and the logo and its entirety. Choosing the company logos’ color will require some thought and a clear understanding of the brand identity along with the message you want to convey about the company. The brand color scheme is one of the most important decisions when creating the overall identity and aesthetic. This guide can help you understand how colors are generally perceived and can help as a starting point for selecting a defining color scheme.

 

The color emotion guide

 

Colors have a strong influence on our emotions and behaviors and marketers, as well as brands, will often put this color psychology to good use. Researchers have long been studying the effects of colors on our feelings and on how we perceive the things around us and undoubtedly some of these are very well known. Selecting a company color should be a decision that takes place when investors work on their trademark. For example, entrepreneurs in Asia can work with their designer to find a suitable color, while creating a distinctive trademark for their company in Singapore.

 

What company owners should know is that they can use the color psychology to choose the most suitable color scheme for their brand logo. The list below is a brief guide of the emotions generally attributed to each of the main colors.

 

Red: passion, power.

Orange: energy, warmth.

Yellow: optimism, sunshine.

Green: soothing, nature.

Blue: trust, peace.

Purple: royalty, creativity.

Pink: femininity, tranquility.

Brown: serious, robust.

Black: sophisticated, prestigious.

White: clean, noble.

Grey: mature, accessible.

 

Naturally, entrepreneurs can choose a single color or a combination thereof. Foreign investors who choose to open a company in another country can perform a research before choosing their brand color. For example, an experienced team of Cypriot company formation agents can help entrepreneurs start their business in this EU country that offers a very advantageous tax regime.

 

Issues to consider

 

The logo color can fit in a common color scheme for the industry. For example, green is naturally a very common choice for gardening businesses. However, the color selection process should be based on a thorough research to find the company’s true voice, regardless of the ones of the competitor’s.

 

When creating a distinctive trademark in Hong Kong, for example, entrepreneurs who are trying to open a company in the financial industry – one of the most developed ones in this jurisdiction – can stray from the commonly used colors in this business sector, like blue (which symbolizes trust) and create a bold and new logo.

 

The company’s tone and the message it means to send out to the world are all important factors when creating the brand logo. These, together with the chosen color scheme, should come together harmoniously to reveal the brand identity.

 

 

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Derek Hood - Visual Artist Launches New Collection


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Derek Hood is a top UK based artist known for his vast collection of unique pieces of artwork. Derek has always been thrilled with drawing and painting, and therefore it was not surprising when he enrolled at University to study Fine c. The university is one of the best when it comes to honing the skills of students in matters of visual artistry. This move helped kickstart Derek’s journey in mastering fine arts as he gained broad exposure during his time at the university where he had the chance to interact with some of the best minds in the field as well as to visit several exhibitions which he drew inspiration from. He was also actively involved in student activities such as leading various exhibitions which prepared him to step into greatness.

 

Since his graduation from the university in 2007, Derek has embarked on creating various types of visual artistry. He started off by focusing on drawing, a field in which he found himself to be a natural. Derek has a knack for creating an image off the top of his head. All he needs are his tools, and he uses a wide array of them such as wax pencils, graphite pencils, ink, and pen. He is also well versed in various drawing techniques using graphite pencil sketches, for example, blending, scribbling and cross-hatching.

 

After practicing on drawing for a while, Derek decided to shift his focus to painting. This decision was informed by a trip to the Sistine Chapel where he laid eyes on various painting techniques that sparked not only his curiosity but also his interest. His style of painting is unique and speaks volumes about his personality and style. Derek prefers to use bright colors which stand out. He applies various blends of primary colors which he mixes deliberately to come up with his paintings. He draws his inspiration from the period he tries to portray or from a culture. He also looks up to the works of some of the greats in the industry for inspiration such as Urs Fischer, Katina Bock, and Kapwani Kiwanga.

 

Derek is also interested in various other forms of art which he also learned at the university. These art forms include:


  • Cubism
  • Expressionism
  • Impressionism
  • Illuminated manuscript
  • Dadaism
  • Mosaics
  • Surrealism
  • Photography

 

His latest undertaking has been in the field of sculpture. Derek has always known he had a thing for sculpturing and he is now focusing his time on honing his skills and creating amazing pieces of sculpture. Derek has his mind set on becoming one of the greatest artists in the UK. After completing his studies, he is now focused on creating a fantastic gallery that would stand out for decades to come and which will showcase his unique skills and secure a place for him among the greatest UK artists of all time.

 

Derek has been already well onto his way of making his dream come true. His works have already been featured in several of the top street galleries and art exhibitions in the country.

 

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Transcending colors through cultures


Joshua Strydom is a Zimbabwean artist, photographer and print maker, whose work is engaging differences between cultures through visual vocabulary. While traveling, he is exploring cultures, variety of folklore and traditions, and trying to connect the opposites by mediating through art.

 

His work is strongly inspired by African cultures, while there is a narrative in his art pieces which speaks about history, mythology and cultural values. Patterns and colors in his prints are often dedicated to the geographic specifics of the culture he is inspired by.

 

His series of prints, "Dzizi", "Nzou", and "Duiker", is inspired by old Zimbabwean sayings, traditional words of wisdom passed on from generation to generation. The original idea for these prints was to use black, as he wanted to give power to these statements he was presenting, but because he did not want black to be connected to Africa as "the black continent", black was excluded from the color choice. The final choice of color ended up being a mix of purple, red and a little bit of black, which is a color associated with the color of the African soil.

 

 

"Dzizi" is telling us behind the scenes story about rebellion and speaking for oneself, while it also explains how it was once thought that owls have horns and they were traditionally considered to bring death. On the top of the picture there is a tree and a climber - this rapresentation is coming from a saying that the fruit on the ground belongs to everyone, but the fruit on the tree is for the one who can climb.

 

 

"Nzou" is showing as an image of an elephant. Elephant is a totem animal for some members of the tribe, which means that their ancestor's souls are in elephants, and so these members of the tribe are not allowed to eat elephants. Although the head of the tribe is allowed to enjoy the meat of the elephant, everyone else is not. In the second plan you can see the image of a leopard, illustrating what we can learn from nature in differences between hyenas and leopards - that the numbers can overpower the strength.

 

 

"Duiker" is the third print in this collection, also based on old African sayings, all inspired by nature and natural circumstances, especially animal life. Even though the chosen color truly agrees with the stories and meanings behind these art peaces, it is interesting how in reaching this shade, the primary choice had to be excluded from the options, to give space for creativity to bring the adequate solution.

 

Following series of art pieces is "Anansi ne rwaivhi", which is a story folded in a specific way, inspired by the chameleon and the sayings about the chameleon in Africa. Artist's vision for this piece was to not make it monochromatic, but to show the main characteristic of a chameleon, which is the ability to change colors.

 

The colors are changing and melting into one another, and variety of saturation and vibration of different colors is present. The images used for this print are images of nature, inspired by the grass, the soil, the chameleons transformations. There is a progression from the last page of the book to the beginning, where while colors interflow throughout the pages, the very first page of the book is merging all the colors and shades at once, presenting this astonishing ability of chameleons.

 

Joshua is a paper maker and a print maker, he makes paper out of elephant's feces and all of his work requires a lot of time and dedication. His work is mostly inspired by nature and cultures he crosses paths with. The process of eco printing for him starts by taking pictures of interesting occurrences in nature, and then keeping the original shapes from the picture, transferring these impressions and experience to the paper.

 

Other techniques he is working with are using etching press, silk printing, screen printing, lithography, and others. His recent work is a screen print inspired by a poem about personality of the wind. It is a collaboration with Milena Brkić, during an art residency in Serbia, organized by inspiring change.

 

From an interesting conversation with Joshua, we discovered how, in art world, some colors are present because some had to be excluded from the palette, while sometimes it is a case of having to include specific colors and trying to find a way for all of them to co-exist in an art piece, like in the "Anansi ne rwaivhi" book.

 

 

You can find more about Joshua's work on his webpage http://joshuastrydom.com and Instagram profile  @strydzo_dzos

All the photos are taken from Joshua's site.

 

About the author

Nina Petrov is an activist, poet, performer and mathematician. She communicates with the world mostly through words, movement and equations, but sometimes also by speaking very loudly. The only truth she could say about herself is that she keeps changing every day, never stops learning and interacting with her surroundings.

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How Strategic Use of Color in Web Design Can Increase Conversions


 

Anyone can put up a website for any reason, but most webmasters do it to get conversions. Getting visitors to sign up for a newsletter, fill out a contact form, and buy products or services their site is offering is what gets webmasters going, and web design plays a crucial role in acquiring those conversions.

A website’s design is an essential factor in getting visitors to check it out. Ease of navigation, mobile responsiveness, and the way the call-to-action button looks are just some of the many elements that can either attract or turn off users.

The same goes for color and how web designers use it in their work. Colors are a powerful tool in web design because they make quite an impact on human attitudes and emotions.

With strategic color use, web designers can make a website project an air of reliability. Creating a sense of urgency or making people feel passionate about something is also possible if the web designer uses specific colors in a particular way. Whatever reaction or emotion a website's design elicits from visitors, you can bet that the colors the designer used have something to do with it.

Industrial psychology has a sub-field called color psychology, which revolves around analyzing the emotional and behavioral effects that colors and color combinations produce. With an understanding of color psychology, a good web designer can use certain colors and the human emotions associated with them to trigger specific reactions from visitors. More often than not, the right use of these colors in web design can lead to conversions.

To be able to use color strategically, a web designer must know which values and emotions are commonly associated with what colors. Here’s a guide on some basic colors that you can refer to when designing a website.

Red

Are you working on a page for a clearance sale which will last for a limited time only? Use red to make visitors feel like they have to rush immediately to the store or miss out on the opportunity. When used in marketing materials that scream about huge discounts, red can create a sense of urgency.

Blue

In the business world, the use of blue is common since it projects security, stability, reliability, trust, and intelligence, among other things. Blue is also cool to the eyes, which is probably why many people associate it with calmness and serenity.

Black

Black is elegant, sleek, and glamorous, which is probably why ad campaigns for high-end products use it frequently. Black is great for projecting power and authority as well.

White

The healthcare industry uses white heavily because it symbolizes hygiene and cleanliness. White also represents innocence, purity, and virtue.

Yellow

If you want to draw visitors in by projecting cheerfulness and warmth, then you should use the color yellow in your design. Go a little easy on the color though, because a color as sunny as yellow can get a bit overwhelming.

Green

Websites dedicated to environmental causes typically use green. Green is also popular among businesses that would like to convey decisiveness to potential customers.

There are many colors out there with emotional associations determined by color psychology. Study them, use them strategically, and help improve your conversion rates.

About The Author

Anthony Tisara is the Outreach Manager at My Biz Niche, the go-to Phoenix-based digital marketing agency specializing in effective SEO and stunning web design solutions built to capture your target audience and generate more leads. He enjoys traveling with his family and organizing weekly trivia events with his friends.

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16 Branding Ideas for Your Online and Offline Locations


 

Figuring out how to brand your business so it’s easily recognizable to consumers is challenging. Not only do you need consistency across both online and offline locations, but within the messaging itself.

You compete against millions of businesses. With more than 30 million businesses represented on Facebook, for example, you need a plan to stand out from all the noise the typical consumer is inundated with, or you’ll likely be overlooked.

Fortunately, there are a number of ways you can integrate both online and offline marketing to create a voice for your brand and reach your target audience.

1. Offer Custom Content

Don’t just churn out generic content or retweet other people’s content. If your goal is to drive people to your website, then you have to give them a reason to go there. Content is still king when it comes to offering something custom to your customers. Seventy-eight percent of people are more likely to trust a company offering custom content versus generic.

2. Make Your Logo Memorable

There are some brands whose logos are so recognizable you instantly know what company is tied to the ad or image. Think about some of the popular brands out there, such as McDonald’s or Walmart. You instantly thought of their logo, didn’t you? Your goal is to make your logo just as memorable. This is accomplished with color, specific typography and exposing the consumer to the logo over and over again.

 

Guitar Studio’s logo is memorable in that it incorporates what they do by adding musical instruments into the logo itself. The text is bold and simple, but the colors are black and red, which catches the eye over a white background.

3. Wrap Your Vehicle

Out-of-home advertising, such as wraps on vehicles, has a six to one return on investment (ROI). The overall look should match your brand identity. A professional can help you match colors and typography so your vehicle is as recognizable as your website or storefront.

4. Share Your Values

What do you value as a brand and as an individual? This should clearly tie into your company’s overall purpose. If you aren’t passionate about something, consumers will see that. However, you also have to communicate your purpose so they know what you’re striving toward.

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Life Is Good has a basic philosophy of spreading good vibes. You see this in everything they do, from the clothes they make to the message on their website to sharing photos of their customers and how they treat their employees. It’s an overreaching message for their brand that you’ll see over and over again. They also donate money toward helping improve the lives of children.

5. Sponsor Local Events

Sponsoring local events is a great way to get out in your community and start building relationships on a local level. As with other advertising opportunities, remain true to your brand image with the same logo, colors and message. Local events can include fundraising, little league and school events.

6. Offer Transparency

Consumers care that a brand means what it says and is open and honest. If a brand offers total transparency, around 94 percent of people say they will likely remain loyal to that brand. Make transparency part of your overall branding efforts both online and offline.

McDonald's deals with all sorts of rumors about their mega-brand, so they came up with a transparency campaign in Canada to answer any questions consumers might have and tagged it "Our food. Your questions."

7. Police Your Brand’s Usage

One of the worst things you can do is let other people represent your brand in a way that is unflattering to you. If you don’t stop these imposters, then you risk the general public thinking you endorsed whatever they said or did. Disney is notorious for protecting their name and trademark, and rightfully so. You should be as well.

8. Show Them You Care

People feel an emotional connection to brands they think care about them. Sixty-five percent of consumers say if a brand cares about them they are more likely to form a long-term relationship with that brand.

Harley Davidson is well known for their amazing customer service that goes on long after that initial purchase of a new motorcycle. Once you buy a motorcycle from them, you're considered part of their "Harley family." There is a Harley Owners Group (HOG) that you can join. This allows you to connect with other Harley owners and share tips and maintenance ideas.

9. Put Your Stamp on Everything

If you want people to become familiar with your brand name and logo, you need to put it everywhere. If you have a brick-and-mortar store, put your logo on the bags you place purchased items in, at the top of the sales receipt and all over your store. For online, add your logo to social media, your website, and any email you send out.

10. Give Out Freebies

Find brand ambassadors to help you spread the word about your brand and what you do. This means passing out things such as hats and T-shirts with your brand logo and message on it, but also developing an insider pool of people who will help you spread the word.

11. Start a Rewards System

Want to drive loyal customers to buy more often? Develop a rewards system for everything from referring new customers to purchases they make. Brands such as Starbucks do a good job of blending online and offline marketing by offering an app that rewards loyal customers. They also have a “frappy hour” they send out push notifications about.

12. Throw an Online Event

Facebook allows you to schedule events, create private groups and host a party online. Optionally, you could also install chat software on your site and host an online event on your own server. The key to throwing an online event is to get people in the door. You can do this with free prize drawings, a special guest speaker and mentioning the upcoming event on social media and to your private mailing list.

13. Host an In-Person Party

In real life, you can host a party for local media to get the buzz going about your brand. Invite any influencers in your area as well. For example, if Mary has always been your number one fan and regularly sends people into your store to try what you have to offer, invite Mary to your VIP party.

14. Walk the Neighborhood

Print out some door hangers or flyers about what you have to offer and invite the neighborhood to come see you at your place of business. Even if you’re on an extremely tight budget, printing these items doesn’t cost much. All it will take is a little of your time.

15. Give Speeches

Be a guest speaker both online and offline. This allows you to reach new people one or a few at a time and tell them about what you do. First, you must find a topic that people want to know about and that ties into your niche. Then, you develop some talks that teach others but also promote what you do and your business.

16. Trade Advertising

Seek out like-minded business owners who run businesses that are similar to yours but not direct competition. For example, a bakery might team up with a wedding planner. You then trade advertising in one another’s newsletters and refer people to one another.

Branding Ideas

These are just a few branding ideas applicable to both online and offline branding efforts. Keep your eyes and ears open for additional opportunities to get your brand message out there. The more people hear about you, the more likely they are to consider doing business with you.

 

 

 

 

Lexie is a graphic designer and typography enthusiast. She spends most of her time A/B testing websites and creating style guides. Check out her blog, Design Roast, and follow her on Twitter @lexieludesigner.

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The Emotional and Behavioral Effects of Color


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It is difficult to dispute the importance of color to branding-related endeavors. Color is evocative, creates an attraction between consumers and products and is capable of boosting recognition of a brand significantly.

 

The fact of the matter is that colors have the ability to produce feelings of happiness or sadness, sensations of thirst or even fatigue. Designers need to grasp the ways in which different colors can psychologically impact everyday people, including the audience a client intends to reach. It is worth reviewing the manner in which color guides our decisions, emotional reactions and moods.

 

Warmer Tones

 

Sitting adjacent to one another on the color wheel are hues of yellow, orange and red. These are known as warm colors, and they are known to bring about a feeling of energy, gladness and hopefulness. It is also necessary to note that orange and yellow may cause irritation to some people's eyes, and they can work to boost appetites.

 

Consider some of the more popular fast food establishments and their frequent use of red and yellow in packaging, logos and the like. What is the reason for this? The goal is to prompt feelings of hunger and an impulse to eat something immediately.

 

Stunning Reds

 

Dynamic and warm in nature, red routinely sparks the full emotional spectrum. Many think of it as a color of love and passion, but also of risk and rage. This is a color that can set heart rates racing and generate a sense of real excitement. If a design element needs to receive a significant amount of attention, such as an online security alert, it is wise to render it in red. Used as an accent, however, red should be applied moderately, since it has a tendency to feel overwhelming at times.

 

Oranges

 

This is a color grouping that generates happy, vital feelings in those who see it. It is an attention-grabbing hue, but it does not feel quite as powerful as red. Orange is forceful, but maintains balance and friendliness. For effective calls to action and invitations to subscribe to or purchase a product, orange can be an ideal choice.

 

Sunny Yellows

 

In terms of the warm color family, yellow might just be the tone with the most energy. It conjures thoughts of sun, laughter and light. Yellow accents are great for producing an optimistic vibe in viewers. Of course, yellow does reflect large amounts of light and may feel harsh or irritating at times. Thus, this color should be used in a measured way in order to draw attention just where it is needed.

 

Cooler Hues

 

Purple, green and blue comprise the cool color family. These tones generally produce feelings of calmness and serenity, though they can also be seen as somewhat sad. Many feel that purple is great for promoting creativity, given that it blends relaxing blue with fiery red. Clients needed to generate an aura of beauty, healthfulness or safety ought to think about using these types of colors.

 

Grassy Green

 

This color has long reflected feelings of wealth, health and regeneration. Green is pleasing to the eye and can help in the creation of balanced designs.

 

Beautiful Blues

 

Tranquility, spirituality and trust are all feelings elicited by the color blue. While darker blues are great for generating a professional look for corporate clients, when used to excess, the effect can be rather cold. Lighter tones of blue create an approachable and friendly vibe.

 

Powerful Purples

 

Long recognized as a color connected to royalty and wealth, purple tends to lend a soothing air. Therefore, it is a popular choice for cosmetic and personal care products. Deep purples are perfect when a sense of luxury is required.

 

Comfortable Neutrals

 

White, tan, black, gray and brown are essential colors for the backgrounds of great web design. White, black and gray are great for pairing with bright tones. When texture is part of the design scheme, brown or tan backdrops are key.

 

Designers must always remember that responses to color are very subjective and may differ substantially depending on the cultural background of the viewer. Because of this, designers must never fail to research their intended audience and make deliberate color choices based on their findings.

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Using Colors for Effect in Photography


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Every designer knows the art of using colors to elicit a desired emotion.  Whether it is to create a certain comfortable feel in a bedroom, setting the right tone for a web page, or creating a mood for shops or restaurants; choosing the right color palette is a critical design decision.  But did you know the same principals apply when creating a work of art?

 

Take photography as an example.  Manipulating elements within the image can produce a dramatic difference to the feeling of the shot.  Understanding the elements involved – and the techniques for manipulating them – can help the new artist achieve results that go beyond creating beautiful images and instead help make a deeper emotional connection with the viewer.

 

Color of Light

Photography is often referred to as painting with light.  And light has its own color.  Light falls on a sliding scale of warm (yellow and orange tones) – most often associated with sunshine or daylight, to cold (blue tones) -  created by man made florescent type lighting.

Light sources can even shift within the scale, like sunlight depending on the time of day.  The hour just sunrise or before sunset is called “The Golden Hour”the blu by photographers because the sunlight has a soft, warm, golden hue.  But the hour just before sunrise or after sunset is referred to as “The Blue Hour” because the angle of the sun to Earth is allowing only the blue spectrum light to appear.   Photographing the same subject just hours apart will produce dramatically different feels to an image.

 

Filter effects

Light can be manipulated through the use of filters.   In prehistoric times, photographers had to physically attach gels to the front of the camera lens.  Fortunately today the same effect can be achieved within your Smartphone or by using post processing software like Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop.  Use them to enhance the feeling you are looking for with an image, or to completely change the feel of it altogether.

 

Dominate Color

The most obvious place to identify a dominant color is in the main subject of the image.  A photograph of a field of lavender – or a green meadow – are pretty obvious examples as to their color palette.  Subtler can be the hues of a sunset, or uniforms of a marching band on the streets.  Controlling the dominant color sets the feeling for the piece – both the positive or the negative.

 

Red

Passionate, aggressive, important, warmth, anger, revenge, attention

Orange

Playful, energetic, cheap, enthusiasm, courage, creativity

 

Yellow

Happy, friendly, warning, joy, laziness

 

Green

Natural, stable, prosperous, tranquility, calm, money, jealousy, envy, hope

Blue

Serene, trustworthy, inviting, coldness, fear

 

Pink

Feminine, young, innocent

Purple

Luxurious, mysterious, romantic, royalty, foreboding

 

 

Brown

Earthy, sturdy, rustic

 

Black

Powerful, sophisticated, edgy, formal, evil, darkness

White

Clean, virtuous, healthy, cold

 

Grey

Neutral, formal, gloomy

 

Beige

Accentuates surrounding colors

 

 

 

Primary and secondary color

Combining colors will also have the effect of combing emotions.  A woman in a red dress against a black backdrop can show the darker, evil side of passion.   A green plant sprouting in a brown forest shows hope or renewal, while the same plant shot in a sun kissed meadow can show tranquility.

 

So the next time you are out shooting with your camera, stop a minute to think of the emotion you want to elicit from the viewer and apply your color palette well.

 

These colourful images were provided by Dreamstime.com.

 

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A special gift for the youngest Colorlovers


Upon your request and in collaboration with the illustrator Miruna Sfia, we prepared a little coloring book for our youngest Colourlovers. You can download a printable 8-page PDF and mix and match the colors as you please.

We can't wait to see what you come up with!

Check out the wonderful illustrations below.

These are just some of the examples!

For more, feel free to download the file here.

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@Art_of_Melissa That's a good idea! It will surely help to set you apart from the crowd! ^^
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