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Our team of writers brings you daily trend coverage, new products, inspiration, information and fun ideas. With an archive of more than 2,272 articles, you're sure to find something you love. Or if you have a great idea, let us know!

Colorful Allusions vol. 9

Colorful Allusions vol. 9


Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.

img

imgPhoto by jsc*

We found [mushrooms] in all shades of brown, yellow, and red, from velvet darks up to the most vivid orange scarlet. But most wonderful of all were the deep purple ones. Purple has always been to me the mystery color, the magician's color. All the mushrooms looked very wise and as if they could weave spells and incantations, but the purple ones were the Merlins of the wood. —Una Hunt, Una Mary: The Inner Life of a Child, 1914.img

imgPhoto by zebble

Then Grandfather would begin to speak of the dreams that would visit him so often as time wore on. ... He'd been
tyle="font-size: 25px">dreaming
in blue, he'd say: the rain in his dream was the deepest blue, midnight blue, and it was this never- ending blue rain that made his hair and his beard grow even longer. —Orhan Pamuk, The Black Book, translated by Maureen Freely, 2006

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Best Color Compositions From Across The Web

Best Color Compositions From Across The Web


We thought we would take a look at some of the best designed color compositions from across the web. Organized by base color, we searched through the CSS galleries over at Design Meltdown and CSS drive to find some websites whose color palettes we think are great.

BLACK + WHITE

bwsite-2.jpg
rafaelzundt.com

bwsite-3.jpg
gleamix.jp

bwsite-4.jpg
imagineboris.com

bwsite.jpg
canvasmagazine.ne

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Color In Quotes

Color In Quotes


As many of you know, it feels almost counterintuitive to use words to describe color. With endless possibilities of different shades and tones, one can seemingly only speak of primary colors and hope that the reader is creating the correct mixture in their head. As difficult as it may be to describe a specific color, describing the importance, and personal impact, of color all together is somewhat more of a manageable task, and many words have been said by all types of people who share a love for color, and recognize the impact it has on all of us.

We thought we would catch up on some of the top colors, palettes and patterns currently ciruclating through the community, and share some words about color from a few famous figures.

Top Palettes

Hymn For My SoulGiant Goldfishw o r d l e s s .Part-Time Super Girl

Mere colour, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. - Oscar Wilde

White is not a mere absence of color; it is a shining and affirmative thing, as fierce as red, as definite as black. God paints in many colors; but He never paints so gorgeously, I had almost said so gaudily, as when He paints in white. - Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions. - Pablo Picasso

disappearing actu.make.me.happyp a r a l y z e d .revealing myself

Why do two colors, put one next to the other, sing? Can one really explain this? no. Just as one can never learn how to paint. - Pablo Picasso

Painting is something that takes place among the colors, and one has to leave them alone completely, so that they can settle the matter among themselves. Their intercourse: this is the whole of painting. Whoever meddles, arranges, injects his human deliberation, his wit, his advocacy, his intellectual agility in any way, is already disturbing and clouding their activity. - Rainer Maria Rilke

The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most. - John Ruskin

In 5...Samsaramy.fiveClementine

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The Color of Language: English Color Etymologies 4

The Color of Language: English Color Etymologies 4


This is the fourth post in a series on English Color Etymologies. Today we are looking at the colors that come from the names of places and foreign words.

English is a colorful language. Since its birth among the tribes of Europe, English has built its color vocabulary with the wealth of words it has inherited from Anglo-Saxon, Norman French, Latin, and Greek. Collected here are 172 colors that standard dictionaries (I used the American Heritage and the Random House) classify as specific color nouns (these do not, of course, include the standard ten – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, black, grey, white – or any Crayola inventions). This treasure of colors is broken down by etymological origin: is the color the name of a flower, an animal, or even a historical person? Some colors appear twice (when I felt two origins were sufficiently different). Others appear only once though they could certainly fit into several categories.

Ever wonder how a color got its name? Refer to the following and enjoy your new grasp on color!

PLACES


Photo by gadl

From Europe to Asia, place names have become color names. It is not surprising that Italy, birthplace of the Occidental Renaissance, contains many such places.

Pompeian_Red
From Pompeii, Italy (and the color found on the walls of its houses).
Venetian_Red
From Venice, Italy.
burgundy
From Burgundy, France (and the color of its wine).
sienna
From Sienna, Italy (short for: terra di sienna, ‘the color of the earth in Sienna’).
manila
From Manilla, Philippines (and the color of
manilla hemp used to make the paper).
champagne
From Champagne, France (and the color of its sparkling wine).
gamboge
From Cambodia (and the resin of trees specific
to southeast Asia).
Chartreuse
From Chartreuse, France (and the green liquor made by the monks living there).
Prussian_Blue
From Prussia. The dye was discovered by a
man living in what is now Berlin (and was
Königsberg, the Prussian capital, at the time).
azure
From Lajward, Turkestan (where a stone of similar color was mined).
lapis_lazuli
From Lajward, Turkestan, modern-day Afghanistan, (where the stone, lapis, was mined).
perse
From Persia.
indigo
From India.
Solferino
From Solferino, Italy (where a battle was fought in 1859, the same year the dye was discovered).
Tyrian_Purple
From Tyre, ancient Phoenicia, modern-day Lebanon.
magenta
From Magenta, Italy.
damson
From Damascus (where the plum tree grows).
mocha
From Mocha, Yemen (a port from which coffee was exported).
Jet_Black
From Gagas, Lycia, modern-day Turkey.
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Color Changing Products

Color Changing Products


Over the years we've all come across color changing products that may have been amazing or disappointing - especially disappointing if you tried to wash you hypercolor t-shirt using hot water only to find out that you have now permanently changed it to the lighter color, but since those trying days of the 80's and 90's, color changing products have continued to develop.

Now, many researchers have applied some of the science behind color changing for applications in public safety, like when water is hot, or streets are cold and covered in ice, and they have also developed some technologies that would allow us to change the color of our cars and clothing with the push of a button. Here is a look at some of the color changing products currently available or in development.

Car Paint


Photo from gizmodo

With a switch of a button your car could change color. Scientist have developed a material that uses an electrical charge to create different colors. The Coating has the ability to reproduce the full spectrum of colors, and it only takes about a second to change from one color to another.

The process starts out with a standard galvanized piece of automotive sheet metal steel. A special polymer is applied to the steel with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles embedded within it. The nanoscale crystalline particles of magnetite (iron oxide) are controlled using a low grade magnetic field which is used to effect the spacing of the colloidal crystals and thereby controlling their ability to reflect light and change color.

Note: Nissan is not actually releasing this product.

Faucets

A number of faucets have been designed to change from blue to red as the temperature of the water increases. They simply use some sort of temperature sensor and a LED light, but can be very helpful in warning of a potential burn situation.

Wall Paint

Eclipse wall paint from Alsacorp will get lighter when heat of some kind is applied. It is also available with extra effects called CrystalFX, SpectraFX or Funky Munkey.

Candles

At frst these candles seemed like they had been touched with 'the magic' until I read a little more and discovered that there is a LED light in the bottom, but the fact that it turns on when you light the wick, using an optical sensor, is impressive enough to include in the lineup.

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What’s Your Color? The Zodiacal Colors

What’s Your Color? The Zodiacal Colors


"In deciding upon a proper color, neither the zodiacal nor the planetary values should be considered separately but blended as an artist mixes paints upon his palette." - Manly P. Hall

There are many theories as to which color is associated with each segment of the zodiac. While there does seem to be some sort of consensus among experts, and non-experts alike, large discrepancies still exsist , even in the COLOURlovers library.

Today we are going to look at three theories. Two put together from historical references from Manly P. Hall and Finnish astrologer Juhani Nummela, and a newer theory proposed over at astrologyweekly.com. Plus, we'll see what people in the COLOURlovers community think their colors are.

Colors associated with the 360 degrees of zodiac

The visible part of spectre of electromagnetic waves is what we call light. More exactly, from the entire range of electromagnetic radiations, the human eye can only perceive those with the wavelength between 380 and 780 nanometers (nm). Below 380 nm, there is the ultraviolet radiation, beyond 780 nm there is the infrared range.

I think there is a correlation between the visible light of different wavelenghts and the zodiac: the visible spectre begins with red and ends with violet, this can be associated with the range of 360 degrees of the zodiac, from Aries to Pisces.

Since the light with a wavelenght of 780 nm is a red light, and the light with a wavelenght of 380 nm is a violet light, a correlation can be considered between the light of 780 nm and 0 degrees Aries and so on, ending with a correlation between the light of 380 nm and 29 degrees Pisces.
- astrologyweekly.com

Aries

Manly P. Hall: brilliant red
Juhani Nummela: red, carmine red
astrologyweekly.com: between 780nm #610000 - 747nm #A70000


Aries_redAriesariesAries_Red

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Color In Nature: Pheasants

Color In Nature: Pheasants


There are approximately 49 species of pheasants. Their habitats range from mountainous regions in the Himalayas to the grasslands of North America and bamboo forests of China.

The color palettes of pheasants range as drastically as their habitats. Many species possess colors you might only expect to see on birds in tropical regions with feathers of bright yellows and oranges that are complimented with deep rich maroons and blues. While other species possess simple soft transitions of beige and gray. Whatever the species, pheasants are a wonderful source of color inspiration found in nature.

Elliot's Pheasant

Photo by jowo
Elliot's Pheasant

  • Other Names: Bar-backed Pheasant, Chinese Barred-backed Pheasant, White-necked Long-tailed Pheasant
  • Range: Southeastern China
  • Habitat: Thick mixed forests to about 6,200 feet.

 

Himalayan Monal Pheasant

Photo by peterjbaer
Himalayan Monal

  • Other Names: Impeyan Pheasant, Impeyan Monal
  • Range: The Himalayas, from eastern Afghanistan to western China
  • Habitat: Mountainous regions; in summer, they are found in rocky, grass covered meadows and winters in coniferous and mixed forests.

 

Silver Pheasant

Photo by benimoto
Silver Pheasant

  • Other Names: N/A
  • Range: South-western China, eastern Burma, southern Vietnam, southwestern Cambodia, southeastern Thailand, northern Laos and the island of Hainan.
  • Habitat: Diverse, both grasslands and bamboo, evergreen and decidous forests.
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The Girl With The Multicolored Hair

The Girl With The Multicolored Hair


Text by Jeff at Omegaword, palettes from the COLOURlovers library

The last time I saw the girl with the multicolored hair, she was following sunbeams through the kitchen door and ran, laughing, out into the world to find another bright friend.

The last time I saw the girl with the multicolored hair, she flew above the treetops where the wind blows warm, and clouds were not allowed to interfere with such a perfect sky.

The last time I saw the girl with the multicolored hair, she sang to the sparrows and the green, green grass, and rain was always welcome, but only after noon.

rainbow hairHair
HairsprayHairdohairsprayHair Madness

Cover img by permanently scatterbrained.

Craig ConleyAbout the Guest Author, Craig Conley Website: http://www.OneLetterWords.comCraig is an independent scholar and author of dozens of strange and unusual books, including a unicorn field guide and a dictionary of magic words. He also loves color: Prof. Oddfellow
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The Color Of Language: English Color Etymologies 3

The Color Of Language: English Color Etymologies 3


This is the third post in a series on English Color Etymologies. Today we are looking at the colors that come from the names of fabrics, gems, minerals and metals.

English is a colorful language. Since its birth among the tribes of Europe, English has built its color vocabulary with the wealth of words it has inherited from Anglo-Saxon, Norman French, Latin, and Greek. Collected here are 172 colors that standard dictionaries (I used the American Heritage and the Random House) classify as specific color nouns (these do not, of course, include the standard ten – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, black, grey, white – or any Crayola inventions). This treasure of colors is broken down by etymological origin: is the color the name of a flower, an animal, or even a historical person? Some colors appear twice (when I felt two origins were sufficiently different). Others appear only once though they could certainly fit into several categories.

Ever wonder how a color got its name? Refer to the following and enjoy your new grasp on color!

FABRICS


Photo by snowriderguy

Various fabrics, often named for their city of origin, have become synonymous with specific colors.

Scarlet
From the Persian word for “rich cloth,” saquirlāt.
stammel
A coarse, woolen cloth for undergarments (no longer used).
beige
A soft fabric of undyed wool.
Loden
A durable, German fabric used for making coats.
kendal_green
A coarse, green fabric similar to tweed.
lincoln_green
A cloth formerly made in Lincoln, England.

GEMS, MINERALS, METALS


Photo by cayusa

The earth is a rich source of life, and color terminology.

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DIY Color: Dye It Yourself With Kool-Aid

DIY Color: Dye It Yourself With Kool-Aid


With the help of our friend Ana we're going to take you through some ways to use Kool-Aid as a colorful, affordable and environmentally safe dye.

Kool-Aid dyeing works best with animal fibers. Which means you can dye your hair but you might have trouble with your cotton t-shirts.

What You Will Need:

 

  • Kool-Aid, in as many colors as you can find (try looking in your kid's, or 'Nintendo loving' roommate's, drawers)
  • Microwave or stove
  • Containers to soak, bake and cool the yarn
  • A place to dry the yarn.

 

Getting Started

 

Let the yarn soak in a dish filled with lukewarm water and a squirt of dish soap for 30 minutes until soaked all the way through.

Remember: Cover your work surfaces to protect against staining by using plastic bags.

Combine 1/2 cup water to one packet of Kool-Aid and stir until smooth.

Use the proper tool for the job. The tennis racket cocktail stirrer served multiple uses. The stick-end was used to stir up the KoolAid dye mixtures and the racket-end was great for scooping the test mini-skeins out of the hot water.

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