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Daily Posts. Colorful Ideas & Inspirations.

Our team of writers brings you daily trend coverage, new products, inspiration, information and fun ideas. With an archive of more than 2,279 articles, you're sure to find something you love. Or if you have a great idea, let us know!

Life In Color: The Work Of Jasper Goodall

Life In Color: The Work Of Jasper Goodall


Jasper Goodall is the kind of artist whose work sticks with you: once you see it, you'll always recognize its iconic look afterwards. A friend did me a great service by introducing me to his work, and I found myself consistently fascinated with his bold use of color and pattern. Part homage to the classic rock posters of the sixties and part visions of modern life at its most chic, Goodall creates contemporary fantasy art -- of the sort you wouldn't be embarrassed to hang in your living room.

Jasper was born in England in 1973 and grew up under the tutelage of parents who encouraged his love of art and supported his pursuit of it. By age 14, he was sure that he wanted a career in the arts. After completing a Foundation year at Birmingham's Bournville college of art, he went on to get his BA in Illustration at the University of Brighton, graduating during the nineties and heading full steam towards what he dreamed of doing for a living - creating full time.

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While Jasper's rise to popular status may seem a blur to the casual onlooker, he certainly put in his time as a freelance illustrator in both commercial and editorial capacities. His work with once-popular print magazine The Face pushed his work into the public eye and created a buzz around his name. Since that time, he has gone on to work for many major companies, including MTV, Gucci, Nike, Adidas, Coca-Cola, BMW and more.

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Colorful Allusions vol. 13

Colorful Allusions vol. 13


Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour.  In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes.  Try to guess the exact hue of each.  Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words.  Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue.  Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.

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Photo by nuanc

There is a red carnation in that vase. A single flower as we sat here waiting, but now a seven- sided flower, many- petalled, red, puce, purple- shaded, stiff with silver- tinted leaves a whole flower to which every eye brings its own contribution.

—Virginia Woolf, The Waves, 1931.

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Photo by DylanT1

More and more as I grow older I see the beautiful dream of life expanding till it is much more important than gray life itself a dark, red dream the color of the cockatoo.

—Jack Kerouac, Journal, July 4, 1949; quoted by John Leland in Why Kerouac Matters, 2007.

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UFO Spotted Over Poland “We Come in Color”

UFO Spotted Over Poland “We Come in Color”


No contact with aliens was made, but I hope that if they do arrive... they do it with this much color. The UFO was an art project conceived by established New York artist Peter Coffin and created in collaboration with London-based Cinimod Studio. The colorful UFO made its appearance July 4th at the Gdansk Festival of Stars.

See More Photos and Read More Details at Dezeen Design Magazine

Color UFO Photo by Michal Szlaga

The overall UFO structure is 7 metres in diameter and manufactured of aluminum for lightness. 3000 bright and individually controllable Color Kinetics LED nodes have been arrayed across the structure and are controlled via a solid state computer. An on board 6 kw generator provides the system power, and the overall UFO can be remotely controlled via SMS messaging.

Color UFO Photo by Michal Szlaga

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Spectral Colors Of Brocken Bows And Glories

Spectral Colors Of Brocken Bows And Glories


Imagine hiking on a sunny mountain and witnessing an unforgettable phenomenon worthy of a Hollywood special effects team: as a bank of chilly fog rises from a couloir, your shadow grows to gigantic proportion (hundreds of feet high), surrounded by a prismatic halo.

Brocken Bow
Brocken Spectre

In olden times, the spectre was considered to be of supernatural origin and fearfully ominous in nature.  Today, the phenomenon is known as a "Brocken Bow," named after a mountain in Germany.  Like a small, circular rainbow, a foggy Brocken Bow tends to last from several seconds to fifteen minutes.  Bands of color surround the gigantic shadow at a distance of several feet.  The outermost band is red, and the others follow the order of the typical rainbow.  In some cases, a Brocken Bow is surrounded by a second bow, whose color order is reversed.  A similar phenomenon, known as a Glory, is distinguished by the fact that the bands of color touch the head of the shadow.  Glories typically sport seven bands of color and can last for hours at a time.  Sometimes Glories are surrounded by glowing white fog bows.

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Colorful Allusions vol. 12

Colorful Allusions vol. 12


Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour.  In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes.  Try to guess the exact hue of each.  Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words.  Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue.  Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.

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Photo by elvissa

Some folks say that once in a while you’ll find a coral snake in there, he glistening magic in his yellow and vermillion stripes, lying there near your foot like a thing bewitched, the fatal spell of his fangs in his wonderful color: cute thing, pretty little yellow and vermillion snake. Those rattlers in the swamps are of wonderful coloration: white, black, yellow, orange, red, blue, in great diamonds. Not like desert rattlers, dry, dusty in color, but moist in color, refulgent in color.

—Julian Lee Rayford, Cottonmouth, 1941.

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Photo by -Lori-

I sit on a purple bed, / Outside, the wall is red, / Thereby the apple hangs, / And the wasp, caught by the fangs, . . .
 
Gold wings across the sea! / Moonlight from tree to tree, / Sweet hair laid on my knee, / O, sweet knight, come to me!

—William Morris, "Golden Wings," 1858.

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Colorful Allusions vol. 11

Colorful Allusions vol. 11


Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant color.  In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes.  Try to guess the exact hue of each.  Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words.  Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue.  Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.

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Big gray [moths] with reddish markings, pale blue- green, yellow with lavender, and red and yellow."
 
"What do you mean by 'red and yellow?'" asked the Bird Woman so quickly that the girl almost jumped.
 
"Not exactly red," explained Elnora, with tremulous voice. "A re
t="this.style.color='#840300'" onClick="window.open('http://www.colourlovers.com/color/840300/','_blank','')" title="840300 / dark reddish">d
dish, yellowish brown, with canary- coloured spots and gray lines on their wings."

—Gene Stratton-Porter, A Girl of the Limberlost, 1909.

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img by vk-red

As by a fascination, every eye was now directed to the glaring greenish- grey eye of Simon.

—Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852.

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Classic Colors: Atari Game Manuals

Classic Colors: Atari Game Manuals


I came across a lovely little 'Atari Game Manuals' flickr set from Joe Kral the other day and thought it would be a perfect addition to the wonderful collection of nostalgia inducing color palettes.

While technology may have limited the color palettes of some of the first, and most popular, video games, their colors are no less influential on modern game design and culture as a whole, and an important part to any design is its packaging. The game manual art on many Atari games may have been a bit exaggerated and deceiving leaving the gamer wishing the game looked more like the picture on the box, but are nonetheless full of classic color palettes.

atari-13.jpg    BOXING
Another sports title from Activision, Boxing presents a top-down view of a boxing arena, pitting you one-on-one against another boxer. You have two minutes to either score 100 points and win the fight or finish with the highest score at the end of the round. Your goal is to target your opponent's nose with either a left or right jab, and a successful hit causes your opponent's face to reel back. You can choose to fight against a computer opponent for a single player game or against a friend for a two player bout. This is old school boxing with no white towel and no referee, so keep your guard up and your wits about you and never give up!

 

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atari-8.jpg    GALAXIAN
Galaxian expanded on the formula pioneered by Space Invaders. As in the earlier game, Galaxian featured a horde of attacking aliens that exchanged shots with the player. In contrast to Space Invaders, however, Galaxian added an element of drama by having the aliens periodically make kamikaze-like dives at the player's ship.

The gameplay was relatively simple. Swarm after swarm of alien armies attacked the player's ship that moved left and right at the bottom of the screen. The ship could only fire sparingly by default, but rearmed instantly when an enemy was hit.

 

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Colorful ‘Kids’ Toys

Colorful ‘Kids’ Toys


These toys might not all be color themed, though some definitely are, here are few of the more 'colorful' toys you can pick up for your little COLOURlover.

AMK Modular Sound Toy

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'AMK' is a modular sound toy for preschooler children. In the interaction with the comptuer, single sounds and entire sets can be transferres to sounds blocks called 'klangbausteine'. The children can independently play and combine the sounds through plugging these blocks. Only one sounds per block and age-based limited posibilities of sound modification afford a plain game and offers the children an orientation within the own system.

Color Wheel Puzzle

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Curious kids will marvel at the ways colors combine on our wooden color wheel. Includes 17 colored-wood puzzle pieces and a wood tray.

Easy-to-manipulate blocks provide endless possibilities for the creation of designs and patterns inside or outside of the wooden tray!

Great way to introduce child to the basic principles of both math and architecture, while encouraging both individual and group play.

Designed to teach basic color theory principals, and stimulate children's thought process of cause and effect by showing the result of color combinations.

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Classic Colors: Japanese Hand-Colored Photos

Classic Colors: Japanese Hand-Colored Photos


I came across this wonderfully interesting Flickr set the other day. A selection of 49 hand-colored photos of Meiji-era MAIKO and GEISHA in swimsuit fashions of the time. The photos are from a collection of 150 from the Flickr user Okinawa Soba. Obviously, it was the colors that first grabbed my attention, but the discovery led me to look a little more into the history of hand-colored photos.

The popularity of hand-colored photos peaked in the late 1800's and early 1900's but fell from their standing due to the development of color film. They were especially popular in Japan.

Hand-Coloring

Hand-colouring refers to any of a number of methods of manually adding colour to a black-and-white photograph or other image to heighten its realism. Typically, water-colours, oils and other paints or dyes are applied to the image surface using brushes, fingers, cotton swabs or airbrushes. Some photographic genres, particularly landscapes and portraits, have been more often hand-coloured than others, and hand-coloured photographs have been popular enough that some firms specialised in producing them.

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Photo from Okinawa Soba

Until the middle of the 20th century, nearly all photography was monochrome – essentially black-and-white, as exemplified by the gelatin silver print. Some photographic processes inherently produced images with an overall colour as, for example, the blue of cyanotypes, and photographic processes were altered by various techniques to produce variations in tone

Swiss painter and printmaker Johann Baptist Isenring used a mixture of gum arabic and pigments to make the first coloured daguerreotype in 1840 or 1841. The coloured powder was fixed on the delicate surface of the daguerreotype by the application of heat. Variations of this technique were patented in England by Richard Beard in 1842 and in France by Étienne Lecchi in 1842 and Léotard de Leuze in 1845. Later, hand-colouring was used with successive photographic innovations, from albumen and gelatin silver prints to lantern slides and transparency photography.

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Color Inspiration: Kites

Color Inspiration: Kites


Kites have always been a source of inspiration. Some of the greatest scientist and inventors used kites in many of their most famous experiments: Benjamin Franklin's Leyden jar experiments, and the Wright brothers' first attempts at maned flight, both involved kites. Today, kites are still a source of inspiration, and for color lovers, they are flying color palettes.

The kite was popularized about 2,800 years ago in China, where an abundant supply of superior materials were available; silk, for the sail and flying line, and bamboo, for the structure. However, it is believed that the first kite was invented by Chinese philosophers Mozi and Lu Ban in 5th century AD.

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Photo by bloxrot

Benjamin Franklin began using kites in 1752, and his experiments set the base for the next 150 years of meteorological study. Most famously were his experiments to figure out if the atmosphere worked similarly to a Leyden jar in the presence of an electrical charge.

"It's amazing that Franklin was not killed during this experiment, as others who tried to reproduce it were. Many people trying the experiment according to Franklin instructions were knocked on their butts. Even Franklin admits that he had killed many a turkey in his trials and had himself been knocked unconscious by a charge from one of his Leyden jars. He eventually learned to ground his wires." - Kite History

"...I found that by lying on my back and holding the stick in my hands. I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side. I began to cross the pond with my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue and with the greatest pleasure imaginable." - Benjamin Franklin

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