A Little Thanksgiving Color Love + Inspiration

A Little Thanksgiving Color Love + Inspiration


Thanksgiving is celebrated in November in the U.S. and in October in Canada. Thanksgiving was celebrated in the U.S. on the last Thursday in November until in 1929 with urging from the National Retail Dry Goods Association, President Franklin Roosevelt extended the Christmas shopping season by one week and moved Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November. Here are some fun facts about the holiday and some color inspiration to help get you in the turkeyloving mood.

The modern day holiday is celebrated as an occasion to give thanks for the things we have and the people we share life with. Well, Thanksgiving at the COLOURlovers house was a little smaller last year and I want to take this moment to say that I am thankful to all 38,000 of you who have become members of our growing community. Have a wonderfully color loving holiday.

Scholastic has some great information about the History of the Thanksgiving Feast and how the history has evolved since the 1621 feast the Pilgrims shared with the Wampanoag to celebrate the colony's first successful harvest.

Tikka powder
img by ExperienceLA
Gobble Gobble

The black-feathered (and thin) Wild Turkeys are not same as the white-feathered (very overweight) ones that we serve at Thanksgiving and other holidays.

Tikka powder
img by Liz
Cooked Turkey

45 million Turkeys are eaten each Thanksgiving.

A 15lb. Turkey consists of 70% white meat and 30% dark meat.

Turkeys can drown if they look up when it is raining.

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Colorful Allusions vol. 3

Colorful Allusions vol. 3


Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.img

allusions3-1.jpgimg by sigusr0

Our autumn walks were delightful . . . and the trees took a colouring which in richness, brilliance, and variety, exceeded all description. I think it is the maple, or sugar- tree, that first sprinkles the forest with rich crimson; the beech follows, with all its harmony of golden tints, from pale yellow up to brightest orange. The dog- wood gives almost the purple colour of the mulberry; the chestnut softens all with its frequent mass of delicate brown, and the sturdy oak carries its deep green into the very lap of winter.—Frances Trollope (1780–1863), describing the woods of Ohio in Domestic Manners of the Americans, quoted in The Virago Book of Women Travellers, edited by Mary Morris with Larry O’Connor, 1994.img

allusions3-2.jpgimg by DScott28604

There is little that needs to be said about colour. Employ all the colours on your palette but if you should undertake to paint Berlin, be sure simply to use black and white, just a little ochre and ultramarine, and plenty of deep brown.”—Ludwig Meidner, Instructions for Painting Pictures of the Metropolis, 1914.img

allusions3-3.jpgimg by tcissell01

And the two men laughed in each other’s sea- green, land- gray eyes.—Carl Sandburg, The Complete Poems of Carl Sandburg, 1970.img

allusions3-4.jpgimg by 09traveler

With red and green I have tried to render the terrible passions of humanity. The room is blood red and mat yellow, a green billiard table in the middle, four lemon- yellow lamps with an orange and green glow. Everywhere it is a clash and contrast of the most disparate greens and reds. . . . For instance, the blood- red and the yellow- green of the billiard table contrast with the tiny bit of soft Louis XV green of the counter, on which there is a pink bouquet.—Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890), from a letter to his brother Theo; 8 September 1888. Reprinted in Art in Theory, 1815–1900, edited by Charles Harrison, 1998.img quote>Craig ConleyAbout the Guest Author, Craig ConleyWebsite: http://www.OneLetterWords.comCraig is an independent scholar and author of dozens of strange and unusual books, including a unicorn field guide and a dictionary of magic words. He also loves color: Prof. Oddfellow

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The Colorful Diwali Festival of Light

The Colorful Diwali Festival of Light


Diwali, the major Indian and Nepalese festive holiday, was celebrated just a week ago. With the vibrant colors from this wonderful cultural day still fresh in our minds, we'll take a look at its significance and traditions.

The holiday is celebrated by Hindus, Jains, and Sikhs the world over. Also known as the Festival of Light, it gets its name from the Sanskrit word deepavali, which translates literally to "rows of clay lamps". Though the stories and myths behind Diwali vary across regions, Diwali is everywhere a celebration of the victory of good over evil. It is generally celebrated in October or November, but exact dates vary across cultures and communities. In 2007, it was celebrated on November 9.

Tikka powder
img by acdme

Diwali festivities are spread over multiple days in some regions, during which celebrants explode fireworks, share sweets, and send greetings to friends and family. Women may have their hands decorated with henna designs. Homes are decorated with small lamps and colorful paper lanterns called diyas and kandils, important parts of Diwali decorations. In some parts of India, Hindus also create rangoli, intricate floor paintings made of colored tikka powder or sand. Rangoli designs are made up of an unbroken line, the idea being that there should be no gaps through which evil spirits can enter. Motifs are usually natural – animals, flowers, etc.— though they can also include geometric patterns.

Rangoli
img by teachICT
Diwali lanterns
img by Kaushal Karkhanis



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The Colors in Your Dreams: What Do They Mean?

The Colors in Your Dreams: What Do They Mean?


Are you on that deserted highway, being chased down by Sasquatch who is driving an orange VW bug again? Dream interpretation / analysis is what people use to help them figure out the meanings of their dreams. It is an old art, going back to the ancient societies of Egypt and Greece, where divine messages were thought to reach you through your dreams. Only people with special powers were able to decipher the hidden wisdom of these messages... Now days anybody can do it... but it doesn't hurt to think you have special powers.

In more recent years the study of our dreams was taken up by major Psychologists like Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. These two men had differing views and exactly what the symbols in our dreams meant, but both considered there to be great meaning to be extracted from this area of our subconscious mind. First we'll look at the meaning of colors in your dreams and then provide you with some basic dream symbolisms to help you unlock just what your subconscious is trying to tell you about the orange bug owning Sasquatch who keeps visiting you.

Color Symbolism in Basic Dream Interpretation

The below color associations in dream interpretation should be thought of as loose guides. First, think about what personal color associations you might have... ie, Blue can generally symbolizes truth and wisdom... but if your high school football team wore blue jerseys and the varsity jocks stuffed you in a locker every morning... you might have a different personal reaction to the color blue.

 Red

This is Red

Red can symbolize passion, courage, or your emotional relationships... but it can also be the color of danger. You will need to think about what your personal associations are with red and look at the context of the rest of your dream to find out if you're seeing love or danger. Often they go hand in hand.

Romance Danger by Design

 Orange

This is Orange

Orange symbolizes sociability and friendliness. This color could be showing you new interests or things that are warm and friedly towards you... or maybe your thoughtfulness towards a particular interest.

Blanket for my soul Tender feeling
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Mineral Colors from the Near Side of the Moon

Mineral Colors from the Near Side of the Moon


Eons of meteorite impacts on the lunar surface have left an amazing array of mineral deposits. Back in 1971, cartographers Don E. Wilhelms and John F. McCauley of the U.S. Geological Survey created a series of startlingly colorful lunar maps for NASA. The details below are from the Moon's near side. To see large and complete maps of the moon, see U.S. Geological Survey Website.

moon1.jpg

Endless Forest A Lunar Tan

great white Lunar Moss

Shimomo Crater Impact

Crater Green Lunar Chocolate

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Birthstone Colors: November

Birthstone Colors: November


November has two modern birthstones, Yellow Topaz and Citrine. Both stones come in a variety of warm colors... yellow, orange, red, brown. The name Topaz even comes from the Sanskrit word for fire. Perhaps these warm hues are inspired by the fiery colors foliage turns before they fall for the winter months, or maybe these stones are an inspiration of the last bits of warmth before the chills of December...

Yellow Topaz is also the accepted anniversary gemstone for the 4th, 19th or 23rd year of marriage. Historically the stone was believed to be a source of strength and healing. In the Middle Ages topaz was through to cure both mental and physical ailments... and back further in Roman and Greek times it was thought to increase strength, improve eyesight and even make the wearer invisible.

Yellow Topaz - November Birthstones

Topaz is found in a variety of colors including: brown, red, orange, pink, sherry, yellow as well as colorless and is most often located in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Russia, Australia, Africa, Mexico and Pakistan.

Yellow Topaz

 

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Colors of Religion:  Paganism

Colors of Religion: Paganism


Paganism is an umbrella term for a group of religions that venerate the Earth and Nature, and the ancient Pagan deities. These religions include Wicca, Druidry, Heathenry, Religio Romana, Animism, Shamanism, Eclectic Pagans and various other traditions. All of these traditions share an urge to celebrate life and to honour our connection with all other beings on the planet. Pagans often emphasise the cyclical nature of reality, and so enjoy the cycle of the seasons and the dance of Sun and Moon.

The Long Man of Wilmington, Autumn Equinox
img by OceanBlue-AU
Green is the colour everyone immediately associates with Paganism. It is the colour of nature, of trees, and all growing things. It is associated with the Green Man, a symbol of our connection to Nature, and a manifestation of the life-force. Many Pagans also like the colour purple for its spiritual connotations (it is associated with the crown chakra). Interestingly, purple and green were also the colours of the suffragette movement.

Full Moon Colors

 

The metals are traditionally associated with the heavenly bodies: gold for the Sun, silver for the Moon and the stars, mercury for Mercury, copper for Venus, iron for Mars, tin for Jupiter and lead for Saturn.
Green Man Full Moon

The white, red and and black colours of the Triple Goddess owe a lot to Robert Graves' seminal work The White Goddess. He derived it from the tendency of the Irish myths to declare those "otherworldly" colours in combination, such as the red-eared white cow that was Brigid's only food as an infant, the red, white and black oystercatcher that is called "Brigid's bird" or the red-eared white dogs that occur in so many stories as Otherworld animals.

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Colors of Global Cuisine: Thailand

Colors of Global Cuisine: Thailand


Thailand is a country rich in color, and its cuisine is no exception. With its exotic amalgam of flavors and styles, Thai food is popular in many Western countries. Though the cuisine actually consists of four distinct regional styles (Northern, Northeastern, Central, and Southern), Thai meals all share a a philosophy of balance among the five fundamental flavors – hot, sour, sweet, salty, and bitter. The result is a colorful dining experience.

Colors of Thai Dishes

Pad thai

img by OceanBlue-AU
   Pad Thai
Pad thai is perhaps one of the best-known Thai dishes. It is usually made with stir-fried rice noodles, eggs, fish sauce, sugar, and tamarind pulp combined with a variety of vegetables or meat. In Thailand, it is sold everywhere from the highest-end restaurants to the smallest street vendor.

img

Som tum

img by madhatrk
   Papaya Salad
Som tum is a crunchy, spicy salad made with grated green papaya, chopped tomatoes, whole beans, chilies, pounded garlic, fish sauce, sugar, peanuts, and lime juice. Variations can be found throughout the country made with salted black crab, dried shrimp, salted fish, or white eggplant.

img

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The Absolutely Scariest Colors Imaginable

The Absolutely Scariest Colors Imaginable


For most people, color is basic element of our daily lives that we use for comfort, inspiration, practicality, etc. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, phobias and irrational fears affect approximately 10% of adults. Some of those phobias relate to colors being the most terrifying thing imaginable... for those poor people, this color loving website would probably be hell-incarnate. Here are several color phobias and some of color associations with common and strange phobias.

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Chromatophobia - The fear of colors.

Chromatophobia - The fear of colors.
 
Chromatophobia is an abnormal and persistent fear of colors. Like most fears and phobias, the fear of color is created by the subconscious mind as a protective reaction. It was likely an emotionally traumatic event in ones past that was linked to colors in general or a specific color. Because the association of colors to that traumatic event is so strong, when subjected to colors later in life the unconscious mind brings up terrible feelings. The phobia affects people in different ways, with some experiencing the suffering all the time and others just to direct stimuli.

Specific Color Phobias:

 
Phodophobia
Fear of the Color Red
Fear of the Color Red
Chrysophobia
Fear of the Color Orange
Fear of the Color Orange
Xanthophobia
Fear of the Color Yellow
Fear of the Color Yellow
Chlorophobia
Fear of the Color Green
Fear of the Color Green
 
Cyanophobia
Fear of the Color Blue
Fear of the Color Blue
Porphyrophobia
Fear of the Color Purple
Fear of the Color Purple
Leukoophobia
Fear of the Color White
Fear of the Color White
Melanophobia
Fear of the Color Black
Fear of the Black

 

Common and Strange Phobia Color Association

 

Coulrophobia - The fear of clowns.

IT ClownHe Is Watching You

The fear of clowns is not uncommon among children, but is also sometimes found in teenagers and adults as well. One of the most well known and totally creepy clowns is Pennywise from Stephen King's 1990 film IT . It usually appears as Pennywise the Dancing Clown before taking the form of whatever its child victim most greatly fears.

 

Ablutophobia - The fear of washing or bathing.

Psycho Shower SceneBehind the Curtain

The horror classic Psycho probably helped create this phobia. The shower scene is commonly rated as one of the scariest moments in movie history.

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Find Color Synonyms with the HP Color Thesaurus

Find Color Synonyms with the HP Color Thesaurus


HP has been doing some very cool things around color lately. One thing I recently stumbled onto is their Color Thesaurus. You enter in a color name and it gives you 4 similar named colors and 4 opposite colors. I used the tool to create the basic color wheel info below, but dive in and find out what colors are similar to Rose, Grass, Aqua, Ivory, etc.

Red

This is Red

Synonyms
Rouge
Ruby Red
Cherry
Crimson Red

Orange

This is Orange

Synonyms
Tangerine
Orange Juice
Pumpkin Pie
Burnt Orange

Yellow

This is Yellow

Synonyms
Dirty Yellow
Canary
Greenish Yellow
Mustard Yellow

Green

This is Green

Synonyms
Kelly
Grass
Emerald
Algae

Blue

This is Blue

Synonyms
Dutch Blue
Ocean
Sky Blue
Azure

Violet

This is Blue

Synonyms
Purple
Grape
Plum
Aubergine

The HP On-Line Color Thesaurus

The results that are returned are a large color square with a rendering of the color if it was found. If the name was not found, for example “greeb” was entered, then the next nearest color name in terms of edit distance, in this case “green”, will be returned. So no you won’t have to remember how to spell fuchsia. In addition to the colored square are the corresponding RGB and hexidecimal values. Finally there is a note about how common the color name is. Below this are the color synonyms and antonyms. Each column has smaller color squares rendering the color names and the names with links so that you can easily click-through to these names. The results are based on analysis of 20,000+ color name database in English collected from a 20+ language ongoing online color naming experiment.

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