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Apartment Therapy: Fall Colors Contest

Apartment Therapy: Fall Colors Contest


Our friends over at ApartmentTherapy.com are putting their third annual fall colors contest to see who has the most color loving home. Win Up To $2500 from a total of $7500 in prizes to be awarded! - Thanks to subsomatic for reminding us.

How colorful is your home?

Apartment Therapy: Fall Colors Contest

WHAT: Our Fall Colors Contest is a contest for all color lovers. We're looking for the boldest, most beautiful, most colorful home in the world.

WHY: Color is a powerful part of interior design, and the cheapest way to change a room, but few feel comfortable using it. To inspire confidence, we're going to share all of the best color homes, tips and sources, worldwide.

I've Got Color! - Fall Colors Contest 2007

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Birthstone Colors: October

Birthstone Colors: October


October's stones are both characterized by flexibility or change. The traditional and modern stone for October is the seemingly fickle Opal, and the alternative is the long, slender Tourmaline. Both the Opal and Tourmaline come in a variety of colors, Opal spanning the spectrum.

blue opal necklace   

The word opal comes from the Latin opalus, by Greek òpalliòs, and is from the same root as Sanskrit upálá[s] for "stone." Opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, yellow, green, shore, blue, magenta, brown, and black. Of these hues, red and black are the most rare, whereas white and green are the most common. Opal is the national stone of Australia, with some of the most precious existing there. Opals are iridescent, giving way to an even broader surface colour range.

opal necklace

The varieties of Opal are common (milk opal, milky bluish to greenish (which can sometimes be of gemstone quality), honey-yellow with a resinous lustre, brown, grey, or a colorless glass-clear opal sometimes called Muller's Glass), precious (characterized by tight speherical structure), Fire Opal (or Girasol, is a translucent to semi-opaque stone that is generally yellow to bright orange and sometimes nearly red and displays pleochroism at certain angles), Peruvian Opal (also called blue opal) is a semi-opaque to opaque blue-green stone found in Peru which is often cut to include the matrix in the more opaque stones. Peruvian Opal does not display pleochroism (an optical phenomenon in which stones appear to be different colors when observed at different angles).

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Original Colors: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Original Colors: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz


Though it has been depicted countless times on stage and screen, the marvelous land of Oz has an original and quite inventive color palette. The genuine colors of the yellow brick road, the field of poppies, the Cowardly Lion's mane, the flying monkeys, Toto, and the great Emerald City are preserved in the very first printing of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900). That edition of the book is preserved in the Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division, available for on-line viewing with extraordinarily high quality scans.

"The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was an innovative book not least because of the twenty four full colour plates and myriad monochromatic illustrations in which the colour changed according to the location in the story (Kansas = grey, Emerald City = green and so on). With the illustrative vignettes often encroaching on the text area, the type was cleverly printed over the top of the coloured images" (BiblioOdyssey).

Without further ado, here are the official colors of this beloved classic.

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Yellow Brick Road
Cowardly Lion Mane
yellowbrickroad.jpg

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Poppies in Oz
poppies.jpg

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Emerald Wizard
Emerald City Green
wizard.jpg

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Tin Woodman Blue Flying Monkey Face
monkey.jpg

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Toto Too toto.jpg

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Kansas Cyclone cyclone.jpg

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Craig ConleyAbout the Guest Author, Craig Conley
Website: http://www.OneLetterWords.com
Craig is an independent scholar and author of dozens of strange and unusual books, including a unicorn field guide and a dictionary of magic words. He also loves color: Prof. Oddfellow

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Sony Bravia Multiplies Like Colorful Rabbits

Sony Bravia Multiplies Like Colorful Rabbits


I'm sure most color lovers have seen the memorable Sony Bravia Advert where paint cannons were used to brilliantly color an apartment complex. Well, now they're back with a new commercial using a combination of stop motion, radiant colors, and claymation.

Going to the site begins with tag lines about the effects colors in our lives, one of which is the use of red, orange, and yellow to entices appetite and how the use of pink in bubble gum when it was first invented -- which later became the standard -- was only pink because it was the only color the creator of bubble gum had.

sony bravia play-doh bunnies

Joining up with Hasbro, the company that owns and distributes Play-Doh, this new commercial with the slogan 'Colour Like No Other' for their LCD line hops to life in New York City.

Playing with Play-Doh

play-doh 50th anniversary colour pack   

Play-Doh was invented by Noah and Joseph McVicker in 1956 and awarded U.S. Patent 3,167,440 in 1965. One of many common products invented by accident, it was meant as a wallpaper cleaner. It was marketed by toy manufacturer Rainbow Crafts, and first sold at the Woodward & Lothrop department store in Washington, D.C. Seen here is its 50th Anniversary Collection, showcasing fifty of the colors available today.

Play-Doh is available in several different colors from day-glo to primary and sizes, and has a distinctive smell and texture. Over 900 million pounds have been sold so far. The product is now owned by American toy giant Hasbro.

strip of play-doh colours
Play With Color Flexible Fun

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Diamonds in the Rouge

Diamonds in the Rouge


Though widely perceived as colorless, diamonds are infrequently achromatic and can occur in every hue of the rainbow. In fact, color is one of the four standards for judging the beauty and worth of a diamond (the others being carat, cut, and clarity). When it comes to diamond color, there are two seemingly contradictory principles: less is more, and more is more. The fewer impurities and flaws, the more transparent the diamond and the higher the value. Yet rare colors such as blue, green, pink, orange, and black are highly desirable and even museum-worthy. A faint straw yellow will detract from a diamond's value, while a deep yellow is prized.

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"White" diamonds are classified according to their degree of transparency. Most white diamonds actually contain yellow or brown tints. The Gemological Institute of America developed a scale of diamond color saturation, ranging from D (colorless) to Z (noticeable light yellow or brown). Diamond color is determined by comparing a gem to a master set. Special folded cards are also used to evaluate color. Dara Horn poetically describes how diamond color is influenced by context. Three diamonds that look identically transparent against deep black velvet reveal their differences when placed in the crease of white paper: "The first sat tarnished on the paper, throbbing a bruised and tawny color; the second glowed a dim yellow like a dying gas lamp in an old painting. The last one, exposed and revealed, blazed burning white."

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img by swamibu

When exotic hues are abundant, their intensity and consistency elevate the value. Red diamonds, for example, are the most highly sought after, reaping up to one million dollars per carat. The brilliant red color is a result of minute flaws in the gem's atomic structure. By some accounts, the waiting period for a single red diamond to hit the market is over fifteen years. Green diamonds range from half to three-quarters the price of red diamonds. Bombardment from high-energy gamma radiation gives them their special hue.

The diamond spectrum is divided into four rays:
1. yellow passing into wine into cinnamon brown into black,
2. pale green passing into yellowish-green,
3. bluish gray passing into Prussian blue, and
4. pink passing into rose red
(The Eclectic Magazine, Jan. - April 1853).

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img by jurvetson

 

Some Diamond Color Palette Inspiration:

Diamond Anatomy True Diamond

My Brightest Diamond Crazy Diamond

DIAMOND GRY DIAMOND DUST

Diamond Dust diamond white

blood diamond diamond

SNOW DIAMOND DIAMOND DUST 2

 
 

Heather McIntyreAbout the Guest Author, Craig Conley
Website: http://www.OneLetterWords.com
Craig is an independent scholar and author of dozens of strange and unusual books, including a unicorn field guide and a dictionary of magic words. He also loves color: Prof. Oddfellow

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Landmark Colors:  The Himalayas

Landmark Colors: The Himalayas


The Himalayas are a mountain range in Asia, separating the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau. The greater span of the range includes the Himalaya proper, the Karakoram, the Hindu Kush, and a host of minor ranges, which spells a transition from lush forests to ice and snow. The mountain range is home to the world's tallest peaks with over one-hundred exceeding 7,200 metres (including Mt. Everest).

Of colour, the rich browns of the mountains, their snow-capped tops that resemble white clouds, lush greens of the lowland forests, stretches of blue sky, and the teals found in the rushing, life-giving rivers are just waiting to be discovered. Although it's not the same as being there -- to see these wonderful earth tones -- let's take a journey through pictures to the largest mountain range on planet Earth.

rock and snow mountain

The Himalayas stretch across the six nations of Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Their peaks and valleys hold the sources of three of major river systems in the world, being the Indus basin, the Ganga-Brahmaputra basin and the Yangtze basin. This teal-green supply of silt-rich water allows for so much to grow around it, as it passes its wealth down the spider-web rivers to even more fertile lands, allowing for the greens of plant-life to flourish.

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Pink for October to Support Breast Cancer Awareness

Pink for October to Support Breast Cancer Awareness


October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and along with Pink for October we're encouraging creative people to turn their websites pink for the month. The aim is to raise awareness of breast cancer and support those organizations making a difference to find a cure and support those living with breast cancer.

Psychologically, pink has been judged the 'sweetest' color
- Vargas 1986:144

To celebrate this event I'm going to take a look at the colour pink and consider the cultural and psychological meaning associated with it. I will also be taking a look at some effective uses of pink for websites and a selection of pink based colour palettes to provide a bit of inspiration if you are turning your site pink for October.

When Did it Become Pink for a Girl.

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Pink in many cultures has come to mean girl. It's been attached to the logic that says 'pink for a girl and blue for a boy'. The exact historical occurrence of this seems to point to after World War II. These 2 quotes shed some light on the history of the link between pink standing for a girl.

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Colors of the Top 20 Magazine Covers

Colors of the Top 20 Magazine Covers


I've always been fascinated with the cover font color choices magazine editors make. We've begun to index those choices in our Magazine Color Trends section, but we thought we would look at some of the most iconic covers in history. In 2005, the 40 greatest magazine covers of the last 40 years were unveiled at the 2005 American Magazine Conference (AMC) in Puerto Rico, by the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) and AMC. Looking at the top 20 has shed some light on some of the most interesting color choices in the industry. Starting with number twenty, we'll take a trip back through the world of publication color.

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blue magazine diver   

#20 Blue (October 1997)
A man diving appears on the premiere October 1997 issue of Blue. Art Director David Carson, known for his innovative typography and photography designed the cover. Editor Amy Schrier launched the first adventure lifestyle magazine, covering outdoor recreation, action sport and adventure travel for men and women. The magazine also explored the diverse cultures of the world and took a look at their political, economic and social concerns.

diver

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Landmark Colors:  Portmeirion, Wales

Landmark Colors: Portmeirion, Wales


What happens when an eccentric architect has the soul of a painter? He drafts a technicolour blueprint and creates elaborate canvasses out of brick and mortar. Portmeirion, the celebrated Italianate village on the west coast of Wales, and famous location of the 60’s cult television series “The Prisoner,” was built by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis as a retirement project.

If Rainbows Were Architecture

The fairy-tale hamlet he created (30 years before Disneyland) is like a three-dimensional picture postcard exhibiting an unparalleled array of colours. Portmeirion is often cited as an example of “picturesque architecture.” Picturesque simply means that something is proper to be pictured. In the picture that is Portmeirion, foreground and background are the real ground of a rainbow we can walk through.

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Colors to Bring Back Hope

Colors to Bring Back Hope


Two years after the ruin of Hurricane Katrina, homes are coming back around. Even with reconstruction and lots of volunteer aid, something seemed missing among the new walls. The residents have seen nothing but the grey of collapsed homes and the brown of the flood waters and mud. For a city recognized for its abundance of life, the dreariness seemed unshakable.

That is -- until they brought in colour.

colorful front porch of a New Orleans home

aftermath   front porch
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