Classic Colors: Atari Game Manuals

Classic Colors: Atari Game Manuals


I came across a lovely little 'Atari Game Manuals' flickr set from Joe Kral the other day and thought it would be a perfect addition to the wonderful collection of nostalgia inducing color palettes.

While technology may have limited the color palettes of some of the first, and most popular, video games, their colors are no less influential on modern game design and culture as a whole, and an important part to any design is its packaging. The game manual art on many Atari games may have been a bit exaggerated and deceiving leaving the gamer wishing the game looked more like the picture on the box, but are nonetheless full of classic color palettes.

atari-13.jpg    BOXING
Another sports title from Activision, Boxing presents a top-down view of a boxing arena, pitting you one-on-one against another boxer. You have two minutes to either score 100 points and win the fight or finish with the highest score at the end of the round. Your goal is to target your opponent's nose with either a left or right jab, and a successful hit causes your opponent's face to reel back. You can choose to fight against a computer opponent for a single player game or against a friend for a two player bout. This is old school boxing with no white towel and no referee, so keep your guard up and your wits about you and never give up!

 

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atari-8.jpg    GALAXIAN
Galaxian expanded on the formula pioneered by Space Invaders. As in the earlier game, Galaxian featured a horde of attacking aliens that exchanged shots with the player. In contrast to Space Invaders, however, Galaxian added an element of drama by having the aliens periodically make kamikaze-like dives at the player's ship.

The gameplay was relatively simple. Swarm after swarm of alien armies attacked the player's ship that moved left and right at the bottom of the screen. The ship could only fire sparingly by default, but rearmed instantly when an enemy was hit.

 

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Nudibranchs, The Most Colorful Creatures in the World

Nudibranchs, The Most Colorful Creatures in the World


Part of the mollusk phylum, Nudibranchs are the shell-less relatives of the snail and are known for their garish colors. These tiny sea creatures are usually only 2cm - 6cm in length and can be found worldwide. They are able to thrive in any depth of salt water from the deepest darkest ocean floors to warm shallow water.

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There are over 3,000 known species of nudibranchs, and scientist estimate that only half have been discovered so far. The creatures soft-body and short life span of 1 year make it possible for many of them to live undetected and vanish from the earth without a trace.

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Photo by wildsingapore
Ceratosoma

Nudibranchs are blind, and the animal relies on smell, taste and feel to navigate their surroundings to find coral, sponges, eggs, small fish, and other nudibranchs to eat.

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Magnetic Movie: The Colors of Magnetic Fields

Magnetic Movie: The Colors of Magnetic Fields


Commissioned by Animate Projects in association with Arts Council England, Magnetic Movie was created by artists Ruth Jarmen and Joe Gerhardt, also known as, Semiconductor.

The film follows Scientists from NASA's Space Sciences Laboratory excitedly describing their discoveries while the animation of Jarmne and Gerhardt bring to life their descriptions with visualizations of the magnetic life all around us. One scientist describes a field as a 'hairy ball' with ingrown hairs that turn back towards the source creating loops. Another scientist describes another field as 'dancing dots' that collide canceling out or merging with each other.

The secret lives of invisible magnetic fields are revealed as chaotic ever-changing geometries . All action takes place around NASA's Space Sciences Laboratories, UC Berkeley, to recordings of space scientists describing their discoveries . Actual VLF audio recordings control the evolution of the fields as they delve into our inaudible surroundings, revealing recurrent ‘whistlers' produced by fleeting electrons . Are we observing a series of scientific experiments, the universe in flux, or a documentary of a fictional world?

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Feather Colors Affect Bird Physiology

Feather Colors Affect Bird Physiology


Some interesting research has emerged regarding the effects of feather colors on a bird's internal physiology. So, we're taking a look at what they found, mixed in with a little bird palette inspiration.

It has always been thought that the bird made the color, but now scientist have found that the color of a bird's feathers can have a dramatic impact on a bird's physiology.

"The traditional view is that internal processes of birds determine their external features -- in other words, physiology forms the feathers," said Kevin McGraw, an assistant professor at ASU's School of Life Sciences. "But our results indicate that a perceived change in the color of an animal can directly affect its internal physiological state. A barn swallow's hormonal profile is influenced by its outward appearance."

2518459796_61bc008f19.jpg    Lilac-breasted Rolle
The Lilac-breasted Roller, Coracias caudataus, is a member of the roller family of birds. It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, frogs, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level.

 

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"In the animal world, sexual signals by males -- from the antlers of elk to the gaudy tail feathers of peacocks -- have evolved to convey honest, accurate information about the animal, McGraw said. Evolutionary biologists believe the top males in a population can afford the physiological costs of expressing the most exaggerated forms of sexual signals, like a conspicuous dark feather color that is either biochemically costly to produce or makes those individuals more susceptible to predators, he said."

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Kimono: A Japanese Tradition Of Color

Kimono: A Japanese Tradition Of Color


When tourists visit Japan, one of the moments that they are usually hoping to capture in a photograph is a geisha in her full kimono. Although most people associate kimono with these beautiful cultural icons, the garment is in fact the national costume of Japan and worn in various incarnations by most of its residents. The origin of the word kimono actually comes from Ki (wearing) and Mono (thing), directly translating to "thing to wear". The T-shaped garment has an illustrious past, dating all the way back to the fifth century.

The earliest kimonos were actually directly influenced by traditional clothing of China. The garment actually has another name, "ganfuka", which translates directly to "clothes of Wu". It wasn't until the 8th century that kimono truly came into style, however, and the overlapping collar because a predominant part of the fashion.

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Photo by roger jones

During Japan's Heian period (794-1192), kimono became increasingly stylized and elaborate, sometimes incorporating as many as ten layers of robes in varying colors beneath the top layer. Women also grew their hair to incredible lengths which complemented the long lines of the robes, resulting in one of the most striking and memorable presentations of the kimono over the years.

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Genetically Modified Color: GloFish

Genetically Modified Color: GloFish


I guess there weren't enough colors in the ocean.

When scientist first started working to genetically modify Zebra fish, it was in the hopes that a small mutation would allow the fish to identify certain pollutants in waterways wherever they were introduced.

In 1999, Dr. Zhiyuan Gong and his colleagues at the National University of Singapore extracted the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from a jellyfish that naturally produced bright green bioluminescence. They inserted the gene into the zebrafish genome, causing the fish to glow brightly under both natural white light and ultraviolet light. Their goal was to develop a fish that could detect pollution by selectively fluorescing in the presence of environmental toxins. The development of the always fluorescing fish was the first step in this process. Shortly thereafter, his team developed a line of red fluorescent zebra fish by adding a gene from a sea coral, and yellow fluorescent zebra fish, by adding a variant of the jellyfish gene. Later, a team of Taiwanese researchers at the National University of Taiwan, headed by Professor Huai-Jen Tsai (蔡懷禎), succeeded in creating a medaka (rice fish) with a fluorescent green color.

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The fish were first introduced into the U.S. market in 2003 after FDA approval:

Because tropical aquarium fish are not used for food purposes, they pose no threat to the food supply. There is no evidence that these genetically engineered zebra danio fish pose any more threat to the environment than their unmodified counterparts which have long been widely sold in the United States. In the absence of a clear risk to the public health, the FDA finds no reason to regulate these particular fish.
- FDA

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Colorful ‘Kids’ Toys

Colorful ‘Kids’ Toys


These toys might not all be color themed, though some definitely are, here are few of the more 'colorful' toys you can pick up for your little COLOURlover.

AMK Modular Sound Toy

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'AMK' is a modular sound toy for preschooler children. In the interaction with the comptuer, single sounds and entire sets can be transferres to sounds blocks called 'klangbausteine'. The children can independently play and combine the sounds through plugging these blocks. Only one sounds per block and age-based limited posibilities of sound modification afford a plain game and offers the children an orientation within the own system.

Color Wheel Puzzle

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Curious kids will marvel at the ways colors combine on our wooden color wheel. Includes 17 colored-wood puzzle pieces and a wood tray.

Easy-to-manipulate blocks provide endless possibilities for the creation of designs and patterns inside or outside of the wooden tray!

Great way to introduce child to the basic principles of both math and architecture, while encouraging both individual and group play.

Designed to teach basic color theory principals, and stimulate children's thought process of cause and effect by showing the result of color combinations.

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Classic Colors: Japanese Hand-Colored Photos

Classic Colors: Japanese Hand-Colored Photos


I came across this wonderfully interesting Flickr set the other day. A selection of 49 hand-colored photos of Meiji-era MAIKO and GEISHA in swimsuit fashions of the time. The photos are from a collection of 150 from the Flickr user Okinawa Soba. Obviously, it was the colors that first grabbed my attention, but the discovery led me to look a little more into the history of hand-colored photos.

The popularity of hand-colored photos peaked in the late 1800's and early 1900's but fell from their standing due to the development of color film. They were especially popular in Japan.

Hand-Coloring

Hand-colouring refers to any of a number of methods of manually adding colour to a black-and-white photograph or other image to heighten its realism. Typically, water-colours, oils and other paints or dyes are applied to the image surface using brushes, fingers, cotton swabs or airbrushes. Some photographic genres, particularly landscapes and portraits, have been more often hand-coloured than others, and hand-coloured photographs have been popular enough that some firms specialised in producing them.

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Photo from Okinawa Soba

Until the middle of the 20th century, nearly all photography was monochrome – essentially black-and-white, as exemplified by the gelatin silver print. Some photographic processes inherently produced images with an overall colour as, for example, the blue of cyanotypes, and photographic processes were altered by various techniques to produce variations in tone

Swiss painter and printmaker Johann Baptist Isenring used a mixture of gum arabic and pigments to make the first coloured daguerreotype in 1840 or 1841. The coloured powder was fixed on the delicate surface of the daguerreotype by the application of heat. Variations of this technique were patented in England by Richard Beard in 1842 and in France by Étienne Lecchi in 1842 and Léotard de Leuze in 1845. Later, hand-colouring was used with successive photographic innovations, from albumen and gelatin silver prints to lantern slides and transparency photography.

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Color Inspiration: Kites

Color Inspiration: Kites


Kites have always been a source of inspiration. Some of the greatest scientist and inventors used kites in many of their most famous experiments: Benjamin Franklin's Leyden jar experiments, and the Wright brothers' first attempts at maned flight, both involved kites. Today, kites are still a source of inspiration, and for color lovers, they are flying color palettes.

The kite was popularized about 2,800 years ago in China, where an abundant supply of superior materials were available; silk, for the sail and flying line, and bamboo, for the structure. However, it is believed that the first kite was invented by Chinese philosophers Mozi and Lu Ban in 5th century AD.

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Photo by bloxrot

Benjamin Franklin began using kites in 1752, and his experiments set the base for the next 150 years of meteorological study. Most famously were his experiments to figure out if the atmosphere worked similarly to a Leyden jar in the presence of an electrical charge.

"It's amazing that Franklin was not killed during this experiment, as others who tried to reproduce it were. Many people trying the experiment according to Franklin instructions were knocked on their butts. Even Franklin admits that he had killed many a turkey in his trials and had himself been knocked unconscious by a charge from one of his Leyden jars. He eventually learned to ground his wires." - Kite History

"...I found that by lying on my back and holding the stick in my hands. I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side. I began to cross the pond with my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue and with the greatest pleasure imaginable." - Benjamin Franklin

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Fish On! : Selecting The Best Lure Colors

Fish On! : Selecting The Best Lure Colors


One of the more colorful things that sometimes gets overlooked by many of us city folk, who only see nature and bodies of water when there is a popular video on YouTube of someone crashing their personal watercraft, are the carefully crafted colors of fishing lures. Special care is taken in the color selection by lure makers, as it is a very important part in catching the right fish in the right conditions.

Most fish, except for some of those in the deepest of darkest of oceans, where there is no light at all, can see colors, some even have four to five different cones making their ability to see color even greater than our own. While there is some, but not much, evidence that fish have a particular tendency towards red, there is more to selecting the right color of lure than just picking the one with the palette you like best. So, if you ever get a chance leave you computer behind and head out to the lake, we've put together a guide to help you make the right color choice when selecting a lure.

 

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Photo by eaglemac

 

In order to select the best lure color palette there are a few things that need to be considered, such as: Water depth and clarity, season, and the time of day.

Here is a wonderful article, with great graphics that I really wanted to steal for this post, that you should check out for more information: Exploding The Myths With Some Truths About Lure Color, by Greg Vinall.

Water Depth

 

The consensus is that on sunny days brighter colors are the best option, and on cloudy days, darker more natural colors should be used. This is because the various light wavelengths are absorbed at different rates in water, longer wavelengths, like reds, are absorbed easily where as shorter ones, like violet, are absorbed much more slowly and can penetrate into deeper water. So, the farther down your lure goes the fewer and fewer colors will be seen by the fish.

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