More Color Pattern Love with New Styles

More Color Pattern Love with New Styles


Since launching the pattern maker four months ago, more than 85,000 patterns have been colored and shared on the site. We've been adding more pattern styles as fast as we can and now have 69 different pattern styles for you coloring pleasure. Here are some of the recently added pattern styles and an update for browsing similar designs.

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imgPattern By: Pattern Head [www.patternhead.com]

chaseAroundTheDesk waiting paisley
love sari blue paisley
Rajapur the 80's

 

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imgPattern By: designfruit [www.designfruit.com]

fossil remains Kyoto
dream fixed dream escape
Teatime Clock Japanese Print

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Avoid Before Exams… Can a Color Make You Dumber?

Avoid Before Exams… Can a Color Make You Dumber?


Can particular colors affect a student's performance on exams? Color expert Mark D. Fairchild says yes. He cites recent research establishing an "aversion" response to the color red. "If people are exposed to red just before taking an exam they perform slightly less well than if they were exposed to a different color. The cause of this aversion response is not yet known; it could be learned or it could be something intrinsic that causes us to 'fear' red (just a little).

This has also been found in sporting events where athletes dressed in red tended to be more successful . . . perhaps because their opponents were viewing it and having an aversion response (rather than the red having an effect on the athlete wearing it)."

red_sports_colors.jpg

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The Cinematic Color Palette: Satoshi Kon’s Paprika

The Cinematic Color Palette: Satoshi Kon’s Paprika


As the first in an new series, I'd like to introduce you to The Cinematic Palette, a look at the use of color in film and how it acts as a secondary means of communication for the director to tell stories in an organic way. Since I am passionate about beautiful films, I have quite a few in mind for the future, but I'd also love to hear your feedback in the comments about your favorite colorful films and how they affected you.

This week's film of choice is Paprika, an animated film by Satoshi Kon, who is known best for his propensity for stories which stir the emotions while they blur dreams and reality. The effect is mesmerizing and often unforgettable, and while many of his films leave you feeling as if you are awash in a sea of vivid color, Paprika ranks highest when it comes to its carnival of beautiful hues.

paprika-frogs.jpg

Paprika begins in the unspecified future, in which an invention called the DC Mini has revolutionized the psychotherapy industry by allowing the user to view people's dreams. The head of the team, Doctor Atsuko Chiba, is using the device illegally to help patients outside the facility she works in, appearing in their dreams as "Paprika", a young female who embodies her dream alter-ego. At the start of the film, we are shown a reoccuring dream which belongs to Detective Konakawa Toshimi, who figures prominently into the story as the film goes on. One immediately considers the ramifications of such a device when the three prototypes of the DC Mini are stolen, leaving its tremendous power open to manipulation from less than reliable sources.

h_3_ill_841870_paprika-bis.jpg

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Color In Nature: Stapeliads

Color In Nature: Stapeliads


From the harsh arid regions of South Africa and reaching to some areas of Southern Europe color inspiration can be found in the beauty of the Stapeliads. Resembling cacti, Stapeliads are most abundant in warm, dry climates. " Their stems are often angular, mostly four-angled in cross-section, but in some species there are six or more, with some species of Hoodia having more than thirty angles. In size they vary from less than 2.5 cm/1" in length to over 2 m/6" tall. The leaves are in most species reduced to rudiments, sometimes hardened and thorn-like, arranged on bumps or tubercles on the angles."

Below is a stunning set of images of Stapeliads taken by Martin Heigan, plus a few other random flowers as well.

The Many Kinds and Colors of Stapeliads

Orbea Speciosa

 

Photo by Martin Heigan

Orbea Speciosa
Tromotriche Longii

 

Photo by Martin Heigan

Tromotriche Longii
Cotyledon Orbiculata

 

Photo by Martin Heigan

Cotyledon Orbiculata
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All 120 Crayon Names, Color Codes and Fun Facts

All 120 Crayon Names, Color Codes and Fun Facts


For the last 100 years or so kids have been exploring and creating worlds of color with Crayons. For a lot of us, our life long love affairs with color began with these wax sticks and a blank sheet of paper. According to a Yale University study, the scent of Crayola crayons is among the 20 most recognizable to American adults. Coffee and peanut butter are 1 and 2. Here we go down crayon color memory lane with all 120 color names and hex codes, fun facts and photos.

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Crowded Crayon Colors
Photo by Sir Fish

Crayola crayons currently come in 120 colors including 23 reds, 20 greens, 19 blues, 16 purples, 14 oranges, 11 browns, 8 yellows, 2 grays, 2 coppers, 2 blacks, 1 white, 1 gold and 1 silver. Although Crayola crayons come in 120 different colors, the labels are only made in 18, which cover the full color spectrum. Nearly 3 billion crayons are made each year, an average of 12 million daily. That's enough to circle the globe 6 times with color!

120 Crayon Names and Color Codes

Aaron at ColorSchemer.com created a fun list of all 120 Crayon Colors with their hex codes and RGB values. "All of these colors are rough approximations from Crayola’s current list of 120 Crayon Colors. -CS"

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Predicting Tomorrow’s Colors, Today

Predicting Tomorrow’s Colors, Today


Is it possible to glimpse or foresee colors of the future? Will they be rosy, or golden, or perhaps drab? Predicting tomorrow's color trends is vitally important for the likes of fashion designers, cosmeticians, advertisers, furniture makers, dye manufacturers, and automobile companies. The problem, as the philosophical literature of India points out, is that the organ of sight "apprehends only the present color, neither past nor future colors" (Jadunath Sinha, Indian Psychology, 1986). Though we can't physically see future colors, through the corners of our eyes we might become aware of colors on the way out of vogue and spot the inklings of emerging fads. "Color forecasting," explains fashion expert Sue Jenkyn Jones, is a science for anticipating demands for color up to two years in advance of a retail sale season (Fashion Design, 2002). Color forecasters "collate information from all over the world on sales figures and changes in market interest in colors.

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They come together twice a year for conferences in Europe and the United States to summarize and define the broad industry trends." Jones notes that "the principal color advisory bodies are the British Textile Colour Group, the International Color Authority (ICA), the Color Association of the United States (CAUS) and the Color Marketing Group (CMG). In the process of analyzing data, the forecasters also observe and interpret the underlying social and cultural context and make projections for the future." Jones offers an example from the 1990s, when environmentally-conscious consumers showed concern about chemical dyes. "Color forecasters warned the dye companies to concentrate on more natural shades and formulations. This provoked a return to the use of softer-colored 'natural' dyes and to the prevalence of undyed and unbleached materials in fashion." Meanwhile, notes textile expert Helen Goworek, "coolhunters" actively seek out "global influences on future trends by identifying individuals and groups within subcultures who have developed innovative styles of clothing" (Careers in Fashion and Textiles, 2006). Their data and predictions filter down to fashion designers, which helps to explain the similar colours and styles in competing stores.

Spring Color Forecast from the Color Association of the United States

Women's

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Seeing Colors Through Rose-Tinted Glasses

Seeing Colors Through Rose-Tinted Glasses


Thine is the heritage of the world, thine the task of moulding destinies, thine the privilege of seeing all things through rose-coloured glasses.
—Charles W. Wood, The Argosy

"To see the world through rose-colored glasses" is an idiom referring to a positive outlook colored by naivety or sentimentality. As feminist commentator Pamela Varkony puts it, "Looking at the world through rose colored glasses makes for a pretty picture, but not an accurate one." To be sure, one famous drawback of rose-colored glasses is that not everything that appears red is objectively red. Hence, the lovelorn are cautioned against wearing them: "When we are in love, or when we want to be in love, we sometimes see the world through rose-colored glasses and don't spot the red flags" (Christine Hassler, 20 Something, 20 Everything, p. 224). Sightseers are also advised against wearing rose-colored glasses while on holiday: in Alaska, you'll miss seeing the Northern Lights; in Australia, Mount Uluru will be invisible; in Bermuda, you could sunburn and not know it; in Switzerland, the Matterhorn will appear bright pink. Rose-colored glasses are likely rarely abused at the Grand Canyon, where at close of day the sky turns purple, the sun glows orange, and the clouds blush pink.

Rose-Colored Glasses

Whimsy aside, although the exact origin of the idiom has been lost in the "rose-coloured mist" of time (Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit, 1856), we can speculate that it may reference the sanguine light of sunset, when the world is momentarily bathed in rosy radiance. That healthy glow is soon followed by twilight blindness and then impenetrable darkness—hence the air of suspicion. Ironically, though, private investigators and varmint hunters assure us that red lenses help the eyes adjust to low lighting and improve one's night vision. That's because red lenses filter out lower wavelengths and reveal a brighter panorama. So the poetic caution against rose-colored glasses would appear to be ill-conceived.

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img by Malingering.

Indeed, Dr. John Izzo suggests that figurative rose-colored glasses can be a practical tool enabling starry-eyed romantics to pinpoint their ideals and pursue them with focus. He explains: "Usually meant as an insult, [seeing the world through rose-colored glasses] is a way of saying that someone is a bit too innocent, that he or she sees the world with too much optimism. The intimation is straightforward: Wake up and smell the coffee. Some people see the world through other kinds of glasses—cynical glasses—and surely the lenses they choose color their experiences. When it comes to rediscovering wonder and innocence . . . few decisions are more critical than choosing your glasses" (Second Innocence: Rediscovering Joy and Wonder, p. 73). Dr. Izzo seems to be suggesting that in the absence of adopting some sort of rosy focal point, one is likely to see a world limited to depressing shades of grey. It's true that "the particular glasses we wear reflect how we analyze and interpret what we see" (John Peter Rothe, Undertaking Qualitative Research, p. 137), just as the microscopic lens unlocks a richness of detail. These glasses symbolize what Prof. Jerry Griswold calls "forcible shifts in perspective, techniques for seeing things differently." Prof. Griswold cites The Wizard of Oz, "in which Dorothy and her companions put on green glasses before entering Emerald City, and then marvel at how green everything looks. In Pollyanna, however, the equivalent image is, significantly, not rose-colored glasses, but the prism. When the girl hangs dozens of these in the windows of Mr. Pendleton's house, we see something more than her transformation of his gloomy room into a rainbow-spangled place. We see how she has changed him in her prismatic shifts of perspectives. It is her pointing to a spectrum of possibilities, her reminding him of his freedom to choose, which leads Mr. Pendleton to conclude that Pollyanna is 'the very prism of all'" (Audacious Kids, p. 235).

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Octarine: The Imaginary Color of Magic

Octarine: The Imaginary Color of Magic


"Octarine" is a color name coined by Terry Pratchett in his Discworld novels. Octarine is said to be the color of magic, as it is apparent in the crackling and shimmering of light. The word refers to the "eighth color," in a spectrum of black, blue, green, yellow, purple, orange, and red. Octarine has been likened to a fluorescent greenish-yellow purple, a combination impossible to perceive with normal human eyes. Imagine, if you can, the marriage of these two swatches:

smile_magic magic_eyes

Scholar of magic Pete Carroll says he imagines Octarine to be "a particular shade of electric pinkish-purple," a common color in optical illusions. Who can see octarine with the naked eye? Legend has it that only wizards and felines can. That's because an ordinary eye, equipped with rods and cones, would see greenish-yellow purple as gray, black, or nothing at all, while a wizard's eye is said to be equipped with octagons. Some people claim to catch glimpses of octarine in peacock feathers, lightning bolts, rainbows, lens flares, soap bubbles, bonfires, and gemstones.

OctarineThere can be no doubt that octarine is an imaginary color. But is it preposterous to think that normal human eyes might one day be able to perceive a fluorescent greenish-yellow purple? The folks at the Conscious Entities blog posed that very question: "There has to be an octarine, doesn't there? The mere conceivability of another color shows that the spectrum is not an absolute reality. It seems to me that, just as we can always encounter a completely new smell, there would always be scope for a new color, if our eyes were able to develop new responses the way our nose presumably can. But I don't even need to rely on conceivability. Some insects can see ultraviolet light, for example, and some snakes can see infrared. They must assign to those wavelengths colors which we can't see, mustn't they?"

OctarineTheir conclusion, however, is negatory: "Look at the way the spectrum forms a closed circle. If we extended it downwards below red, we should simply get another, lower, violet. Now I grant you that the 'lowerness' would have to be expressed in some way - possibly as 'warmth.' The colors of the visible spectrum are differentiated in terms of warmth, so perhaps the lower violet would appear distinctly warmer than the one we're used to (great scope for interior decorators...). I repeat, the spectrum is a reality. You can call it a mathematical reality if that helps, but it's real. If we saw color the way we hear pitch, all this would be obvious. But the fact that we can't see color harmonies or more than a single octave of colors means there's never been any scope for a genius to come along and produce a regularized interpretation of the spectrum, the way J.S.Bach did for the musical scale."

The COLOURlovers library shimmers with magical colors, though as of this writing there's no color named "octarine." Some magic colors include:

the_magic magic_teal

magic_lime Purple_Magic

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Michael Surtees: “New York City Color Study”

Michael Surtees: “New York City Color Study”


Most observations of sky color tend to focus on sunsets and sunrises when the most dynamic and vibrant colors can be seen, but what about the soft transitions and subtle changes of color from day to day? Michael Surtees's observational photo series “ New York City Color Study” focuses on just that, and in the process enlightens us to the dramatic in the mundane.

On January 16, 2008 Micheal started capturing pictures of the New York City sky though the window of his Manhattan apartment. What has come from this seemingly mundane observation is an amazing set of inspiring images and a reminder that everyday is a new color.

The series is on-going and he isn't planning on stopping anytime soon. The latest photo was taken April 17, 2008.


New York City Color Study

About "New York City Color Study"

For thirty six days now I’ve been taking an image of the sky from my apartment in Manhattan. It wasn’t until I started noticing that most mornings have a really unique colour to the sky that I thought there might be something to comparing the colour day to day. There isn’t any specific time for me to point my camera in the same direction though for the most part I’ve been taking the photograph somewhere between 7 and 9 am. As the sun starts rising earlier my time will probably adjust accordingly.


Uncropped View of New York City Colour Study

It’s a fairly uncomplicated process with the photos. Whether it’s sunny or cloudy doesn’t really matter because each day is unique. I always make sure that the crop of the sky is in a 4:3 aspect ratio with my Leica D-Lux 3. One of the cool yet unexpected things that happens when I upload the photos to flickr and place them in their set is that they create a square which is what the image above is. I always mark the date and time on the photo as extra information that I might want to use at a latter date.

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Color In Nature: Wood

Color In Nature: Wood


Sorting through the incredible number of wood varieties is a task of enormous proportions, and one we didn't even think of taking on. Lucky for us there are people who are doing just that.

Exotic Wood Pictures: Exotic Wood Displayed, described, and Identified is "a non-commercial site focusing on color-correct pictures of exotic and domestic woods." The site, which I found while performing the always necessary first step in any research, a Google search, is wonderful for exploring the amazing colors of the different varieties of wood. The highlighted statistics for the site read:

# different types of wood represented: 685
# unique pictures of those woods: 17,722

For any hard core wood fan out there this a great site to sort through hundreds of options for any upcoming wood related projects you might have on the table, or in the COLOURlovers case, this site can offer inspiration from the unique colors that make up each type.

Below we have assembled a few inspirational palettes with their corresponding types from some of the 685 wood varieties represented on the site. Plus, a few images of the incredible colors of petrified wood.

Wood Color Inspiration

  • Angico
  • Guearu
  • Bosse
  • Cinnamon
  • Caretto

  • Oak, Bog
  • Bishop Wood
  • Briar
  • Podo
  • Zircote

  • Cocuswood
  • Blackbean
  • Beech
  • Makai
  • Buckthorn

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