Pierre David: Naucier

Pierre David: Naucier


At the completion of French artist Pierre David's residency last May at the Modern Art Museum of Bahia in Brazil, he left behind a interesting and thoughtful exhibition celebrating color and the uniqueness of multiracial cultures. In Naucier, Pierre, commenting on racism, photographed 40 people, employees of the Musuem and art students from El Salvador, and displayed their images in classic color swatch fashion. Each individuals color was also formulated into a paint.

"Because I think that both France and Brazil are multiracial societies where skin color is an important social divide," explains Pierr (Google translation), "The local society is openly multiracial.  The genesis of these two countries is very different, but in both cases, the problem of racism exists across society.  Here, as in France, the skin color is an important social brand. Reducing the interest shown by an individual solely on the color put in an immediate way the issue of racism."

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The Colors Of Climate Change

The Colors Of Climate Change


Nature is our most precious color resource...

Today, blogs across the world unite in a common action for a common purpose: to start a conversation about climate change. Recognizing our responsibility to preserve the colors that inspire us, COLOURlovers joins Blog Action Day by sharing climate change inspired colors, palettes and patterns created by our community. You can add to the conversation by putting your climate change inspired colors in the comments.

Palettes

global_warming Global_Warming

global_warming global_warming

Global_Warming Global_Warming

global_warming global_warming

global_warming Global_Warming

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HTML Color Codes: An Exhibit On Digital Color

HTML Color Codes: An Exhibit On Digital Color


The HTML Color Codes exhibition features a selection of internet based artwork that address the topic of digital color. The central question that the exhibition poses is whether or not artists working with the internet are in fact limited to a “ready-made” color palette, a premise that many artists working with film, photography, and mass produced, standardized paint sets have assumed. The rationale for this question stems from theories of perception that argue that color is a not ready-made object found in a paint set or machine, but rather it is an experience that results from a complex process of light interacting with the retina and human nervous system.

The exhibition begins and ends along a polemic. On one extreme, color is viewed exclusively in terms of its “ready-made” code, indicated by the programming language that the artist has used. In order to use color on the internet, one must adopt the standardized hexadecimal system of color values. This system involves designating a six-digit code combined of letters and numbers (such as 0000cc for a deep blue), which is then interpreted by HTML for online visualization. HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is a programming language conventionally used for coding and structuring the elements on a web page. Software applications such as Macromedia Dreamweaver or Adobe Flash automate coding so that designers or artists can manipulate the space and plug in graphics without memorizing code. The first four artists featured in the exhibition (Chris Ashley, Michael Demers, Brian Piana, and Owen Plotkin) demonstrate the some of the possibilities for hexadecimal values in color-based, visual, internet art.

Look, See by Chris Ashley

Project

Look, See is on an ongoing series of HTML drawings that Ashley begun in 2000. The drawings are made using HTML tables in the WYSIWYG editor in Dreamweaver, a software application used to create websites. The WYSIWYG editor (What Your See Is What You Get) is a tool used for editing a web content that, unlike writing source code, allows for the direct manipulation of the colors and shapes that will appear online. The HTML table is a grid with a designated number of rows and columns. After making the selections for the table, Ashley assigns a hexadecimal value to each square in the grid, giving it its color and code. A new HTML drawing is made every day. The selections for this exhibition are the set of drawings from April 2009. All the images vary to some degree. However, a general aesthetic is at work throughout---solid and mostly opaque colored squares and rectangles that create a larger square shaped image. At the same time, the trick is that there is no image. It is solely code and its execution. If a user tries to click on the “image” to save it, she will find this impossible. Look, See plays with the intrinsic grid that structures most content on online (vector based images are the exception). While still retaining reference to this constraint, Ashley also manages to make each drawing visually elegant.

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Colors From Rothbury

Colors From Rothbury


For the second year in a row more than 30,000 people descended into the Rothbury Music Festival set against the scenic backdrop of Michigan's west coast and hidden amongst the forest on the land of Double JJ Ranch. Besides music, Rothbury invites a number of found object artists and runs a series of panel discussions with leading entrepreneurs and scientists. Together, they transform the grounds with natural mandalas and epic shrines, all made from found objects collected from the grounds and around Michigan, and create a thoughtful dialog about sustainability. Bringing these two sides to the festival together is the "passion based" organization Our Future Now, which sets to spread environmental and social awareness by combining art, science and community.

Art Installations

Emerald Installations is made up of Scott O'Keefe, Christopher Reitmaier and Nateure (a person), and, well, nature (actual nature) as well, since they only use found and donated objects, many of which are given by the trees and plants.

The group, lead by Scott, has been invited to Coachella, UofC Berkley, Joshua Tree Festival and other institutions and festivals to reshape the natural environment, inspiring attendees to take a moment and realize their surroundings and themselves, for that matter.

Emerald_Installation bottle_cap_shaman

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Color From The Venice Biennale

Color From The Venice Biennale


This is a guest post written by Howard Sullivan who together with Tom Phillipson make up the London based design agency Your Studio. You can see the original post on their blog.

“Underneath Day’s azure eyes, Ocean’s nursling, Venice lies, A peopled labyrinth of walls, Amphitrite’s destined halls.”

As the sun rose and the art-crowds flocked, the great palazzos threw open their doors this weekend marking the opening of Venice’s 53rd Biennale, curated by Daniel Burnbaum and open

Francis Upritchard’s ‘Yellow Dancer’ from ‘Save Yourself’, installation for the NZ Pavillion, Palazzo Mangilli-Valmarana, Venice Biennale, 2009



For the next four summer months. This showcase of the world’s best and most diverse art talent is the modern treasure within not only the amazing crumling palazzos but also at the ‘Arsenale’, a grand industrial L-shaped sequence of double-height brick warehouses and at ‘Giardini’- a large open park scattered with rambling pavilions and outbuildings.

We first encountered Francis Upritchard at Kate MacGarry’s Vyner Street Gallery for the show ‘Feierabend‘ with Martino Gamper and Karl Fritsch.  Save Yourself‘, Upritchard’s show representing New Zealand at the Biennale at Palazzo Mangilli-Valmarana is both entrancing and unmissable.

Francis Upritchard’s ‘Save Yourself’ for the NZ Pavillion, Palazzo Mangilli-Valmarana, Venice Biennale, 2009
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'Significant Color' At The Aram Gallery

'Significant Color' At The Aram Gallery


Significant Colour is an exhibition exploring the impact of colour and its richness as a subject matter for designers in different disciplines. This show continues the Aram Gallery’s interest in the ways designers think and work. Pieces on show include furniture, photography, textiles, jewelery art, sculpture, communication, lighting and architectural projects.

Participants in the exhibition are architects de Rijke Marsh Morgan and Sauerbruch Hutton, who both in their own right communicate a contemporary use of colour on the external facades of their buildings. Artist Sophie Smallhorn will be showing wall sculptures exploring three dimensional colour theories. Ori Gersht’s photographs reveal the beauty of found colour in our environments and designers El Ultimo Grito show their Guau lamp - scarlet disks of circular light floating and shimmering on the wall like a red moon. Cristian Zuzunaga who has recently collaborated with both Ligne Roset and Moroso, applies his ‘pixel’ textile designs to a uniquely commissioned window blind in the gallery. The jewellery artist Mah Rana challenges us with her conceptual jewellery art pieces. Ptolemy Mann is showing a new series of three dimensional, free-standing monolithic textile sculptures that vibrate with saturated threads. Olivier Droillard has made a poetic Mushroom console table inspired by a walk in the French Alps exploring the de-saturated colour nuances of nature. The graphic designer James Goggin playfully tests the boundaries of print on demand colour reproduction in bespoke publishing, with his project Dear Lulu. Finally, the essential inclusion is the colour theorist, Josef Albers, showing both his classic nest of tables for Vitra and his Homage to the Square lithographs.

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Holi: Life, Joy & Color

Holi: Life, Joy & Color


Though Holi is a month behind us now, here at COLOURlovers we never miss a chance to remind people and share the love of this Festival of Color that takes place each March to welcome in the spring throughout India and other locations with large Hindu populations.

ReefRaff

There are a few stories out there behind the festivals origins (read about those in this nice writeup about the festival by Colette) and you can get a different tale depending on who you talk to and which region you happen to be in, but it is clear what Holi really celebrates is the bright colors that are synonymous with life, joy and positive energy within the Indian community.

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Colorful Ideas For St Valentine’s Day

Colorful Ideas For St Valentine’s Day


This is a guest post written by speakin_colors to help us all come up with some colorful ideas to share with our loved one this Valentine's day.

Historically speaking, Valentine was a Roman priest martyred under the emperor Claudius. While in prison, Valentine fell in love with Julia, a blind young girl who was the daughter of his jailer. One day, due to the miracle of love, Julia recovered her eyesight. The day Valentine was executed, on February 14th 270, he sent a setter to her beloved which romantically read “From your Valentine”, a phrase which was going to be popularized in the course of time.

Romantic Ideas for Valentine’s Day

The surprise element is the key to revive passion and to spend an unforgettable day. Common traditional gifts are valentine cards, flowers and chocolate. Roses, for example, come in a wide range of colours but it must be remembered each different colour has a different meaning. Colour definitely sends a silent, yet extremely important message, from the sender to receiver. So, before selecting roses for someone the following chart (from The Gardener’s Network) should be consulted to make sure the right message is conveyed!

Photo by teachastrid

Meanings of Rose Colors

  • Red: Love, beauty, courage and respect
  • White: Purity and innocence, silence or secrecy, also reverence and humility
  • Pink: Appreciation,"Thank you", grace, perfect happiness, and admiration
  • Dark Pink: Appreciation, gratitude
  • Light Pink: Admiration, sympathy
  • Yellow: Joy, gladness, friendship, delight, the promise of a new beginning
  • Orange: Desire, and enthusiasm
  • Red & White: Given together, these signify unity.
  • Red Rosebud: A symbol of purity and loveliness
  • White Rosebud: Symbolic of girlhood
  • Thornless Rose: Signifies "Love at first sight".
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New Art From India & Pakistan

New Art From India & Pakistan


An exhibition that recently opened at Philips de Pury & Company takes a look at new works coming from India & Pakistan and sets out to give an overview of the current Art trends by answering the ambitious question "what is 'Indian' in 'Indian Art' and what cultural exchanges are implied in the asking?" With such an interesting context and impressive catalog of work, I thought this show would be a good sources for some color inspiration. Below you can find a selection of work from the show. More images are available at the exhibition page.

The Audience and the Eavesdropper


The Audience and the Eavesdropper will present a selection of works by each artist to convey the strength and breadth of each individual ouevre. Together, these works depict a nuanced, complex portrait of the themes and trends emerging under the banner of “Contemporary Indian Art”. This ambitious exhibition asks, what is “Indian” in “Indian Art” and what cultural exchanges are implied in the asking? These artists work in a variety of media including painting, sculpture, video, installation and design and draw from multiple cultural and artistic histories. The vast majority of the artwork has been created specifically for this show and Phillips de Pury & Company is proud to be the first to exhibit these works.

Hema Upadhyay

Institutional and museum attention for Indian contemporary art has initially fallen onto the shoulders of many commercial venues to promote and exhibit this new frontier in contemporary art. This exhibition enables the introduction and exhibition of a new, exciting and highly influential group of artists from South Asia, many of whom have never shown outside the region. An exhibition catalogue will accompany this highly anticipated show.

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The Chinese New Year & The Color Red

The Chinese New Year & The Color Red


As it is the first day of the Chinese lunar new year I thought we would take a look at a little history of the celebration and why the color red is so important. So, let us wish everyone a happy 'Chinese year' of 4707, 4706, or 4646. We hope much luck will come in this year of the Ox.

According to tales and legends, the beginning of Chinese New Year started with the fight against a mythical beast called the Nian or "Year" in Chinese. Nian would come on the first day of New Year to devour livestock, crops, and even villagers, especially children. To protect themselves, the villagers would put food in front of their doors at the beginning of every year and believed that after the Nian ate the food they prepared, it wouldn’t attack any more people. Once, people saw the Nian was scared away by a little child wearing red, they then understood that the Nian was afraid of the color red. Hence, every time when New Year was about to come, the villagers would hang red lanterns and spring scroll on windows and doors. People also used firecrackers to frighten the Nian and from then on, the Nian never came to the village again and was eventually converted by Hongjunlaozu, a Taoist in the old time, and became his mount.

Happy Nian; Photo by cactusbeetroot


New Year Practices

The Chinese New Year celebrations are marked by visits to kin, relatives and friends, a practice known as "new-year visits" (Chinese: 拜年; pinyin: bàinián). New clothes are usually worn to signify a new year. The colour red is liberally used in all decorations. Red packets are given to juniors and children by the married and elders.

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