Color Inspiration: Red Minerals

Color Inspiration: Red Minerals


Currently, there are 4000 known minerals, with new discoveries being made year after year. Here are a few yellow minerals to inspire your next palette.

Color in Minerals

The absorption of light, and the apparent color, is determined by a mineral's atomic bonds which are made up of electrons that absorb certain wave lengths. The colors produced through absorption and emittance are usually produced by transition metals. Even trace amounts of these elements can have a drastic effect on color.

  • Cobalt produces the violet-red color in erythrite, (cobalt arsenic sulfide).
  • Chromium produces the color orange-red color of crocoite, (lead chromate).
  • Copper produces the azure blue color of azurite, (copper carbonate hydroxide).
  • Iron produces the red color of limonite, (hydrated iron oxide hydroxide).
  • Manganese produces the pink color of rhodochrosite, (manganese carbonate).
  • Nickel produces the green color of annabergite, (hydrated nickel arsenate).
  • Uranium produces the yellow color of zippeite, (hydrated potassium uranyl sulfate hydroxide).
  • Vanadium produces the red-orange color of vanadinite, (lead vanadate chloride).
chalcotrichite.jpg
© Tom Loomis / Dakota Matrix
   

Cuprite

 Color  Brown red, Purple red, Red, Black
  
 Location  Christmas mine, Gila Co., Arizona, USA
  
 Luster  Adamantine
  
 Streak  brownish red

 

img

kermesite.jpg
© Lou Perloff / Photo Atlas of Minerals
   

Kermesite

 Color  Violet red, Cherry red, Red.
  
 Location  Pezinok (Pernek), near Bratislava, Solvakia
  
 Luster  Adamantine
  
 Streak  brownish red

 

img

duranusite.jpg
© Thomas Witzke / Abraxas-Verlag
   

Duranusite

 Color  Gray-white with a brownish tint and brownish red internal reflections
  
 Location  Duranus, Alpes-Maritimes, France

 

img

414-04.jpg
© Jeff Weissman
   

Cuprotungstite

 Color  Brown red, Red
  
 Location  Apache Mine, Hidalgo County, New Mexico, USA
  
 Luster  Resinous
  
 Streak  yellow

 

img

crocoite.jpg
© Dave Barthelmy
   

Crocoite

 Color  Yellow, Orange, Red, Red orange
  
 Location  Adelaide Mine, Dundas, Tasmania
  
 Luster  Adamantine
  
 Streak  yellowish orange

 

img

sarabauite.jpg
© Richard Dale / Dale Minerals
   

Sarabauite

 Color  Carmine red, Red
  
 Location  Sarabau Mine, Sarawak Province, Borneo
  
 Luster  Resinous
  
 Streak  orange

 

img

metahewettite.jpg
© John Veevaert
   

Metahewettite

 Color  Red
  
 Location  Cactus Rat mine, Grand County, Utah
  
 Luster  Silky
  
 Streak  brownish red

 

img

spessartine.jpg
© Lou Perloff / Photo Atlas of Minerals
   

Spessartine

 Color  Red, Reddish orange, Yellowish brown, Reddish brown, Brown
  
 Location  Haramosh Mountains, Baltistan, Northern Areas, Pakastan
  
 Luster  Vitreous - Resinous
  
 Streak  white

 

img

ferrierite.jpg
© Lou Perloff / Photo Atlas of Minerals
   

Ferrierite-Na

 Color  Colorless, White, Pink, Orange, Red
  
 Location  Monte Lake, British Columbia, Canada
  
 Luster  Vitreous - Silky
  
 Streak  white

 

img

eudialyte.jpg
© John Veevaert
   

Eudialyte

 Color  White, Colorless, Red, Yellowish white, Reddish white
  
 Location  Mt. St. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada
  
 Luster  Vitreous - Silky
  
 Streak  white

 

img

amarantite.jpg
© Tom Loomis / Dakota Matrix
   

Amarantite

 Color  Brown red, Orange red, Pink, Red
  
 Location  Chuquicamata, Antofagasta, Chile
  
 Luster  Vitreous (Glassy)
  
 Streak  yellow

 

img

fluorapatite.jpg
© Dan Weinrich
   

Apatite

 Color  White, Yellow, Green, Red, Blue
  
 Location  Tip Top mine, Custer, Custer County, South Dakota, USA
  
 Luster  Vitreous (Glassy)
  
 Streak  white

 

img

nasonite.jpg
© Lou Perloff / Photo Atlas of Minerals
   

Hancockite

 Color  Brown, Brick red, Brownish red, Maroon
  
 Location  Franklin, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA
  
 Luster  Vitreous - Dull
  
 Streak  brownish white

 

img

barnesite.jpg
© Lou Perloff / Photo Atlas of Minerals
   

Barnesite

 Color  Brown red, Dark red
  
 Location  Cactus Rat claim, Thompson, Grand County, Utah, USA
  
 Luster  Adamantine
  
 Streak  brownish red

 

img

getchellite.jpg
© Thomas Witzke / Abraxas-Verlag
   

Barnesite

 Color  Blood red, Dark red, Purple red
  
 Location  Khaidarkan (Chaidarkan) Sb-Hg deposit, Kyrgyzstan
  
 Luster  Vitreous - Pearly
  
 Streak  orange red

 

img

A Mineral, Not a Rock

A mineral is a naturally occurring, inorganic solid with a definite chemical composition and a specific crystalline structure. A rock is an aggregate of one or more minerals. (A rock may also include organic remains and mineraloids.) Some rocks are predominantly composed of just one mineral. For example, limestone is a sedimentary rock composed almost entirely of the mineral calcite. Other rocks contain many minerals, and the specific minerals in a rock can vary widely. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are common, while others have been found in only one or two locations worldwide. The vast majority of the rocks of the Earth's crust consist of quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite and a few other minerals. Over half of the mineral species known are so rare that they have only been found in a handful of samples, and many are known from only one or two small grains.

Commercially valuable minerals and rocks are referred to as industrial minerals. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as ores (the rocks and minerals that remain, after the desired mineral has been separated from the ore, are referred to as tailings).
- Wikipedia: Minerals

Minerals are categorized by their chemical composition, atomic structure and physical properties. The physical properties being:

  • Color indicates the appearance of the mineral in reflected light or transmitted light for translucent minerals (i.e. what it looks like to the naked eye).
  • Streak refers to the color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on an unglazed porcelain streak plate. Note that this is not always the same color as the original mineral.
  • Lustre indicates the way a mineral's surface interacts with light and can range from dull to glassy (vitreous).
  • Other properties: crystal structure and habit, hardness, iridescence (play of colors due to surface or internal interference), cleavage, fracture, specific gravity, fluorescence (response to ultraviolet light), magnetism, radioactivity, tenacity (response to mechanical induced changes of shape or form), piezoelectricity and reactivity to dilute acids.

Sources: Mineral Gallery, Wikipedia: Minerals, Mineralogy Database


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5 Comments
Showing 1 - 5 of 5 Comments

Anrkist

If anyone lives in Houston, they have an impressive gem collection at the Museum of Natural Science. They have also added a "Vault" collection filled with jewels.

Pulp Fiction

Really pretty pictures...

heykelley

minerals inspire
hues of red grow forth from earth
and we all applaud

^_^

Deco24

Another Color Inspiration with minerals. I will be on the look out for more in the future.

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